30

The birth of Jesus is also only mentioned at all in Matthew and Luke. Following the logic, since only half of the Gospels mention that means we should discard the theory that he was ever born at all. In 100% of the cases where a birth narrative is present, the miracle of God becoming man is mentioned. Indeed, in John, even where the birth narrative isn't ...


26

There are many reasons why Catholics practice Marian devotion. One reason, given by Catholic Pam Brink, is that “If I ignore Mary, I am being disrespectful to Jesus”. Catholic apologist David MacDonald makes the same argument in Why do Catholics pray to Mary?: Is it not disrespectful to someone not to honour his mother? Another reason David gives is that, ...


21

Credit to H3br3wHamm3r81 who actually found this link. According to Catholic Answers, it was because of God's salvation that she was able to be born sinless and remain sinless. Paraphrasing, God saved her pre-emptively, preventing (or perhaps keeping/preserving) her from sinning in the first place, something no human could do without God's protective ...


19

Theologically and historically the veneration of Mary is inseparably linked to an orthodox understanding of the Incarnation. The Council of Ephesus affirmed St. Cyril's defense of the earlier fathers' use of the term Mother of God -- in St. Cyril's account this is an important part of avoiding "the fallacy of speaking of two sons": The Word's becoming ...


18

The underlying assumption is that if something is true, it has to appear in all four Gospels. However, if it appeared in all four gospels, some would ask why doesn't it appear in every epistle as well. It's interesting that people attack the Bible for having four versions of the same story in the Gospels and other people attack the Bible for not having ...


18

Calvin did not like appealing to any tradition or authority other than Scripture. He asserts that the Bible teaches that all have sinned and that all continue to sin, and on that basis each facet of Mariology falls down like dominoes (except perpetual virginity, which he neither defends nor denies based on what he perceives as Scriptural silence). In ...


17

The heresy is known as Collyridianism, after the Greek for the "little cakes" which were offered. Collyridianism was an obscure Early Christian heretical movement whose adherents apparently worshipped the Virgin Mary, mother of Jesus, as a goddess. The main source of information about them comes from their strongest opponent, Epiphanius of Salamis, who ...


16

Born-again protestant Christians are not "against" Mary of Nazareth. Every one of them accepts Mary as the Mother of Jesus, and while few would use the phrase, they have no issue with the concept of Mary as the Mother of God. That said, all but a few protestants, including nearly all who would self-identify as "born-again" reject most of the teachings about ...


16

Sub Tuum Praesidium The earliest known, extant petition prayer to Mary the Θεοτόκος (Theotokos), or Dei Genetrix (the Greek and Latin, respectively, for 'God-bearer' or 'Birthgiver-of-God') is found in an Egyptian papyrus from the 3rd century (commonly dated to around A.D. 250-280 but as late as 300—I could not find a dating later than the 4th century) and ...


15

The Bible does emphatically state that Jesus was without sin. For we do not have a high priest who is unable to sympathize with our weaknesses, but one who in every respect has been tempted as we are, yet without sin. Hebrews 4:15 ESV Since Jesus was never reported to have been married in the Bible, a sexual relationship would have been a sin. ...


15

The essence of original sin consists in the deprivation of sanctifying grace, and its stain is a corrupt nature. Mary was preserved from these defects by God's grace; from the first instant of her existence she was in the state of sanctifying grace and was free from the corrupt nature that original sin brings. Mary therefore says: Luke 1:47 and my ...


14

Short answer There is no usage of the title "Mother of God" in the Bible. The title was used for Mary as early as AD 250-280 and was made official church teaching at the Council of Ephesus in 431. Advocates wanted to use that title, as opposed to the alternative "Mother of Christ", to affirm the doctrine of Incarnation (that Jesus Christ is the second ...


13

One of the defining tenets of Protestant Christianity is sola scriptura--that the Scriptures are the fundamental basis for all doctrine. This is in contrast to extra-biblical teachings. The idea is that if it were important enough for us to know, God would have told us in the Scriptures themselves and not have us rely on extra-biblical teachings. ...


12

One answer that has been suggested is the Infancy Gospel of James (AKA The Protoevangelium of James). This document dates to roughly the middle of the second century and focuses largely on the person of Mary from her birth to the birth of Jesus. As the central character, Mary's honor and purity are defended in great detail. Mary's virginity is repeatedly ...


12

The Catholic Church has a uniquely developed perspective on this question. It is a dogma of the Catholic faith that Mary was immaculately conceived -- or in the words of Pope Pius IX: We declare, pronounce, and define that the doctrine which holds that the most Blessed Virgin Mary, in the first instance of her conception, by a singular grace and ...


12

She was probably between 13 and 14 years old according to the Catholic Encyclopedia in the section entitled "Mary's pregnancy becomes known to Joseph": From the age at which Hebrew maidens became marriageable, it is possible that Mary gave birth to her Son when she was about thirteen or fourteen years of age. No historical document tells us how old she ...


12

At its most basic level, Protestants believe Mary merely to be the earthly mother of Jesus - not the eternal mother of "God." To imply that she had a role in creating that which is divine with Him seems an overreach. This is not to say that Jesus is not God, but Mary's role is as a vehicle for the incarnation, not the means by which the Godhood was made. ...


12

Mary is totally integral to our faith. She is the Mediatrix of All Graces!* She is the Cause of our Joy! She is the Singular Vessel of Devotion! I think you'd have a more productive time talking about Mary with Protestants than avoiding her. She didn't say "All generations would call me a schmo for letting God walk all over me". She said: All ...


12

Mary is the Queen of Universe because Christ is the King of Universe. To understand her Queenship, one must understand how who the Queen of the Davidic Kingdom in the Old Testament Jewish monarchy was. It was the Queen Mother. The Kings had many wives, none of whom could be called Queen. That honor was reserved for the mother of the King. We see this in the ...


12

There are two facets to the answer, one regarding the nature of the sin offering itself, and one regarding Mary’s motivations for making the offering. In summary, in Israel, so-called “sin” offerings were offered for transgressions agains the ritual law, not so much for offenses against the moral law. Moreover, just as Jesus submitted himself to the ...


11

Calvin's commentary on Matthew 1:25 deserves to be quoted in full (hat-tip to gmoothart): 25. And knew her not This passage afforded the pretext for great disturbances, which were introduced into the Church, at a former period, by Helvidius. The inference he drew from it was, that Mary remained a virgin no longer than till her first birth, and that ...


11

Protestant arguments for the doctrine can be divided up into 3 categories. The Bible allows for it The bible does not indicate Mary had other children after Jesus. When Matthew 13:55 (as well as Mark 6:3, John 7:3-5, Acts 1:14, 1 Corinthians 9:5, and Galations 1:19) speak of the "brothers" of Christ, the Greek word used is 'adelphos'. The Old Testament ...


11

Science also says people can't walk on water, turn water into wine, spontaneously cure illness, or walk around after being killed. Whether you accept these things as having happened (as divine miracle) is pretty much the definition of most forms of Christianity. It isn't so much "glossing over", as "this is the doctrine and dogma of the Church". That said, ...


11

I don't want to plagiarize, but there is a very good Catholic article on this here. In summary, the significance of swaddling clothes lies both in the fact that it is humble, common, ordinary, and also that it ties to Solomon - specifically the Wisdom of Solomon 7, 3-6. 7:3 And when I was born, I drew in the common air, and fell upon the earth, which ...


11

The Magnificat or the Canticle of Mary (Luke 1:46-56) mirrors Hannah's prayer found in 1 Samuel 2:1-10 so closely that one would have to think that Mary found her words in through reflecting on scripture. And Hannah prayed: And Mary said: My heart exults in the LORD, “My soul proclaims the greatness of the Lord; ...


11

All Nations Call Her Blessed Mary has been one of the most common names for women throughout the last couple thousand years for good reason: this is the name of the Mother of God. She has been called the God-bearer (Theotokos), the Blessed Virgin/Mother, the Mater Dolorosa, the Second Eve, the Queen of Heaven, the (Black) Madonna, Notre Dame, and the Woman ...


11

For most Protestants this is a matter of semantics. Protestants know full well that Catholics call Mary, the "Blessed Mother." They also know that if you ask a Catholic "Is Mary blessed?" They would surely answer "Yes, indeed she is." But the Catholic should understand that the Protestant, in general, would also answer the same. Mary is blessed. Mary ...


11

It simply means that Mary is blessed not only for bearing the flesh of Christ, but most of all because she heard the word of God and obeyed it. "Mary is more blessed in receiving the faith of Christ, than in conceiving the flesh of Christ. ... For his brothers, his relatives according to the flesh who did not believe in him, of what advantage is that ...


11

The Angelus is composed of three versicle-response prayers, alternating with Hail Marys. The phrase in question is from the beginning. In Latin: V: Angelus Domini nuntiavit Mariae. R: Et concepit de Spiritu Sancto. I learned this in English as V: The angel of the Lord declared unto Mary. R: And she conceived of the Holy Ghost. If I were ...


10

The doctrine of the perpetual virginity of Mary is tradition (mostly Roman Catholic), but actually not in Scripture at all. (I'm not taking a stand on that doctrine for purposes of this question, just pointing out that even Roman Catholics would not, I believe make the case from Scripture.) It mentions that at the time Jesus was conceived by the Holy Spirit,...


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