31

No, for a whole lot of reasons. Old Testament Law says that a man who has sex with an unmarried woman has to marry her. That would be unnecessary if having sex made them married. If that were the case, some teacher somewhere would be reminding people that they had to treat the people they had sex with as if they were wives. Tamar has sex with Judah because ...


31

Good question with a simple answer: No. Categorically no. All mainline Protestants (and actually most branches of Christianity including Catholic and Orthodox) believe that they are radically different. "Categorically" different if I may overload that word. Jesus is God. Son of God in that he is the "son" part of the Trinity, but the very person of God, ...


28

The sanctuary lamp or tabernacle lamp signifies that the Blessed Sacrament is present* in the tabernacle.*cf. Real Presence of Christ in the Eucharist If it is extinguished,* it signifies there is no Blessed Sacrament the tabernacle.*(like during the Stripping of the Altar at the end of a Holy Thursday service) Its origins are Exodus 27:20-21: Command ...


26

No, not really. While you sometimes find them lumped together they are not a subset of the class. In popular usage such as among modern secular journalism, the term "Protestant" has come to mean anything that doesn't properly fall under the umbrella of either Catholicism or Orthodoxy. In this sense where there is no "Option D, none of the above", it sort of ...


24

Evangelicalism is not in itself a "confession". It is more of a general grouping of similar confessions. As such, it is a bit hard to pin down on a specific point of doctrine like your question calls for. That being said, we could paint with a broad brush and describe some of general leanings. Every one of these will be wrong for at least some Evangelicals. ...


23

Protestants do not see that Christ ever instructed his followers to pray (only to baptize) "in the name of the Father, and of the Son, and of the Holy Spirit". On the other hand, Christians are repeatedly called to invoke the name of the Lord: To the church of God in Corinth, to those sanctified in Christ Jesus and called to be his holy people, together ...


22

You're reading way too much into this :) In order to appreciate this song, I think you need to allow for variation of meaning in the English language. Understanding some songs even require that we grant them some poetic license, although I think we should treat those with caution because consciously or otherwise those do tend to cloud our theology. However ...


22

Latter-Day Saints do not consider themselves to be Protestants. The most fundamental concept of the Protestant tradition is an attempt to replace Catholic traditions and Catholic theology with a reformed theology derived from reading the Bible and attempting to interpret it properly. Latter-Day Saints believe that this is impossible to do successfully; that ...


21

My first answer wasn't very good; I want to take a different angle. I hope this approach helps make this issue more clear. TL;DR You don't have to stage a protest to be Protestant. It's a matter of heritage. Of fallacies and analogies... Your question commits some basic fallacies that can easily be addressed. cite an accurate historical reference that ...


20

Some major problems with "KJV-onlyism" lies in the assumptions it makes and some of which you enumerated. From an evangelical perspective, we accept the idea that the Bible is, indeed, the word of God. Specifically, "men spoke from God as they were carried along by the Holy Spirit." 20 knowing this first of all, that no prophecy of Scripture comes from ...


20

From Catholic Answers article Does "no salvation outside the Church" include non-Catholic Christians?, non-Catholic Christians are specifically addressed in the Catechism: The Church knows that she is joined in many ways to the baptized who are honored by the name of Christian, but do not profess the Catholic faith in its entirety or have not ...


18

You are correct that most Protestants do not see the bread and wine as anything more than symbols. There is no blessing that is ever attempted to transform the elements into the literal body and blood of Christ. Consequently, the bread and wine (or juice) that could be stored for long periods of time prior to the observance of the Eucharist (the Lord's ...


17

The Bible is very clear that Jesus did not begin to exist in the womb of Mary. As the Second Person of the Trinity, He exists outside of the physical universe of time, space, and matter and with the Father and Spirit created the physical world. He is holy, was holy, and will always be holy... and sinless and righteous and pure and blameless. When Mary ...


17

It is worth pointing out that even if you take the stance that the verse is saying that Peter had some kind of special status, there is nothing that indicates that that authority is continued in his line. Every other place I can think of where a lineage related authority is granted, it is pretty clearly laid out by God in scripture. (For example the ...


17

Preface, this is a Protestant response. I'm not arguing the validity of it, or any claims here, just answering the question. the short Protestant response would be "Meh". A general Protestant response to each point would be: 1) Where in Scripture does it say there would be any such thing as Apostolic succession? The New Testament speaks of several ...


17

Protestants basically fall into three main camps, claiming that the unpardonable sin is: attributing the works of the Holy Spirit to the devil; or, refusal to repent even to the end of one's life; or, hatefully and willfully slandering the Holy Spirit's testimony of Christ. Within (3), there are three views regarding who can commit the sin: 3a) only ...


17

Those who argue against images of Jesus do so primarily in two ways: (1) that any image of Christ is necessarily inadequate and false and (2) that images of Christ inspire worship and devalue the Word of God. Images of Christ inadequate and false Advocates of this position regularly appeal to the incomprehensibility of God. John Calvin1 and J. I. Packer2 ...


16

What's clear from the account of Jonah is that God would have destroyed the city if it were not for the people's repentance. Jonah's prophecy was accurate in that it articulated what God was going to do, but God relented. There was no failing in Jonah's ability to discern and communicate the will of God prior to the people's repentance, but that remarkable ...


16

The meaning is pretty obvious in context. Ps 137 is a lament for Jerusalem after the Babylonians have invaded and destroyed it. Verses 7-9 make it explicit: 7 Remember, LORD, what the Edomites did on the day Jerusalem fell. “Tear it down,” they cried, “tear it down to its foundations!” 8 Daughter Babylon, doomed to destruction, ...


16

There is a pretty clear distinction between Catholics and Protestants in that regard, though there may be Protestant denominations that do use the crucifix rather than the cross. It seems that the main issue that Protestants today have with the crucifix is that it is specifically an image of Jesus, the Son of God. Such an image is believed to be strictly ...


16

The Bible itself -- if you'll pardon my interpretation -- seems to support such a practice. In the Old Testament, the law is read aloud to the people (Deut 31:10-13; Josh 8:34f; 2Kgs 23:2; Neh 8:1ff) and the king is required to copy out the law so that he may know it and do it (Deut 17:18ff). In both cases, it is read "raw" and the people and rulers are to ...


16

Born-again protestant Christians are not "against" Mary of Nazareth. Every one of them accepts Mary as the Mother of Jesus, and while few would use the phrase, they have no issue with the concept of Mary as the Mother of God. That said, all but a few protestants, including nearly all who would self-identify as "born-again" reject most of the teachings about ...


16

It appears that the simple answer is that because the Salvation Army does not view baptism or communion as requirements of salvation, they are not practiced at all. This stance, however does not constitute disapproval of sacraments: The Salvation Army has never said it is wrong to use sacraments, nor does it deny that other Christians receive grace from ...


16

I can't find this doxology in the lords prayer as recorded in scripture It is in the King James Version: And lead us not into temptation, but deliver us from evil: For thine is the kingdom, and the power, and the glory, for ever. Amen. but the underlying Greek is missing in some manuscripts. Metzger's Textual Commentary on the Greek New Testament (...


15

Short and sweet answer: No, otherwise fornication would be impossible.


15

Protestants would consistently reject certain things connected to the doctrine of Purgatory. Regarding justification by faith alone: the fate of the dead should not be affected by their own suffering (Christ's atonement being sufficient) nor by the prayers and other works of the living. Moreover, Protestants would not believe in a role for the Church here - ...


15

There is debate on the actual meaning of verse 18, particularly what "his rock" is. Is it Peter? Or is it the Truth that Peter told in verse 16? Many Protestants believe that it is referring to the thing Peter said - that Jesus is the Messiah, the Son of the living God. Jesus will build His Church based on who He is. Barnes' Notes on the Bible ...


15

Protestants typically interpret this verse to be referring to Christ, the Chief Cornerstone, when he speaks of the rock upon which the church will be built. Greek Grammar One reason for this is that Peter as a proper name for Simon is masculine in form -- petros (Strong's G4074). When Jesus says "on this rock", the word for "rock" is feminine -- petra (...


15

When you look at Jesus' command in light of the whole law, and other instances where He said similar things (such as "be ye as perfect as your father in heaven"), you realize that while this is a command, it's really just a repetition of all the previous commands given by God over thousands of years. Jesus' command is just a reaffirmation of what God has ...


15

Why do Protestants teach the non-necessity of baptism for salvation? Those who see baptism as something additional to salvation might use the following verses; Luke 23:43 And Jesus said unto him, Verily I say unto thee, To day shalt thou be with me in paradise. The thief on the cross was not baptized. 1 Corinthians 1:17 For Christ sent me not to ...


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