21

Actually, this is more Kabbalah than Christianity and has further roots in the occult and other non-Christian mysticism and folklore (Rumpelstiltskin comes to mind, which is a decidedly non-Christian story). The idea that knowing the name of a beast/demon/whatever gives you dominion over it came from the idea that naming a beast/demon/whatever showed your ...


18

Tertullian One early, clear indication of the doctrine of the personhood of the Holy Spirit appears in Tertullian's work, Against Praxeas, dated around AD 215,1 saying: [W]hile the mystery of the dispensation is still guarded, which distributes the Unity into a Trinity, placing in their order the three Persons— the Father, the Son, and the Holy Ghost: three,...


17

According to mainstream Christianity, the Holy Spirit is a person of the Trinity - loosely speaking a part of God. Therefore he was not created. He is eternal, without beginning and without end. This is best (though not necessarily most understandably) summed up in the Athenasian Creed: Such as the Father is; such is the Son; and such is the Holy Ghost. ...


17

Protestants basically fall into three main camps, claiming that the unpardonable sin is: attributing the works of the Holy Spirit to the devil; or, refusal to repent even to the end of one's life; or, hatefully and willfully slandering the Holy Spirit's testimony of Christ. Within (3), there are three views regarding who can commit the sin: 3a) only ...


17

Here are four common defenses of this doctrine: The masculine pronoun in Greek is applied to the Holy Spirit even when not required by Greek grammar The Holy Spirit is shown to be in a coordinating relationship with other persons, such as the Father and Son, as well as humans, suggesting that he also is a Person The Holy Spirit has personal attributes and ...


13

Understanding the second part of your question is the key to answering the first part. Part One: (How the Spirit was with them before and after Jesus "going away") In John 3:34, it is said of Christ that He had the Spirit of God "without measure". So as He was living on Earth as a perfect sinless man, Jesus had unlimited access to the Holy Spirit, who ...


12

As bradimus has indicated, this is a tricky issue, because projecting the modern debate of cessationism vs. continuationism onto church fathers is anachronistic. That said, some figures in the early church do talk about or infer a decline or end in at least some types supernatural occurrences, sometimes to what are often referred to as "spiritual gifts....


11

The Angelus is composed of three versicle-response prayers, alternating with Hail Marys. The phrase in question is from the beginning. In Latin: V: Angelus Domini nuntiavit Mariae. R: Et concepit de Spiritu Sancto. I learned this in English as V: The angel of the Lord declared unto Mary. R: And she conceived of the Holy Ghost. If I were ...


10

I would like to add some theological background to this answer from the Catholic perspective (and naturally, I would invite Orthodox readers to contribute their own perspective). First, some historical background: As the original question points out, the Nicene-Constantinopolitan Creed was originally written in Greek. Although the fundamental concepts in ...


10

I don't think I could improve upon the summary at the Orthodox Wiki: Objections on doctrinal grounds It is contrary to Scripture, particularly in John 15:26: "But when the Helper comes, whom I shall send to you from the Father, the Spirit of truth who proceeds from the Father, He will testify of Me." Thus, Christ never describes the Holy Spirit ...


9

Perhaps not surprisingly, in light of Ephesians 5, church fathers widely connect Eve with Christ's Church. This seems to displace other interpretations, like a connection between Eve and the Holy Spirit. However, it is at least hinted at in Chrysostom, when he compares the Old Testament man to the New Testament man: Then [i.e., OT times] He said, “Let ...


8

I’ll try to answer the question from a Catholic perspective and, additionally, provide some supplementary information about what has been mentioned in the comments. The general answer to the question is “no”. First, God is Almighty, both before and after His revelation to us. So you can’t exercise power over Him. We can do wonders in Jesus’ name, but only ...


8

Brief Historical Introduction The Nicene Creed originally did not include the words "and the Son" (called the Filioque clause) because it was based on the words of Scripture in John 15:26 (τὸ ἐκ τοῦ Πατρὸς ἐκπορευόμενον). It was added later, and not by an ecumenical council (it was originally inserted by the Third Synod of Toledo). Not to mention, even ...


8

From John Gill's exposition of this passage: For he shall not speak of himself: as Christ, the Son, spoke not of himself in opposition to the Father, so the Spirit speaks not of himself in opposition either to the Father, or the Son, but in perfect agreement with both; being, as of the same nature and essence, power and glory, so of the same mind, ...


7

I will answer from the Trinitarian perspective. The two terms are synonymous... But when they hand you over, do not worry about how or what you are to say; for it will be given you in that hour what you are to say. For it is not you who speak, but it is the Spirit of your Father who speaks in you. -Matthew 10:19-20 When they arrest you and hand you over, do ...


7

Yes, Paul is referring to the Holy Spirit. The Holy Spirit is the Spirit of Jesus. In John 14, when Jesus said to his disciples during passion week "'I will not leave you as orphans; I will come to you'" (v.18), he was promising that although he would not in the very near future be with them physically, he would be with them by his Spirit. He called ...


7

This is from Why I Am a Continuationist by Sam Storms: New Testament evidence of miraculous gifts among Christians who are not apostles. In other words, numerous non-apostolic men and women, young and old, across the breadth of the Roman Empire consistently exercised these gifts of the Spirit (and Stephen and Philip ministered in the power of ...


7

In reality, John 15:26 supports both the Eastern Orthodox and the (Western) Catholic positions, because (at least as far as the Catholic Church is concerned) both positions are valid and complementary. (Note that Eastern Catholics—those who follow the same rites as the Eastern Orthodox but are in communion with the Bishop of Rome—continue to favor the Greek ...


7

According to Roman Catholicism, believers receive these gifts at baptism, which are then made more perfect by the rite of Confirmation. Consider the Catechism of the Catholic Church paragraph 1285, "The reception of the sacrament of Confirmation is necessary for the completion of baptismal grace." For "by the sacrament of Confirmation, the ...


7

Reformed theology maintains the full deity and personality of the Holy Spirit, so that there is no inferiority attached to the Holy Spirit that would result in the kind of subordination that the ‘Reformed House Church’ you mention makes in its statement of faith. What they claim seems to be but one step removed from ancient movements such as the ...


7

Anne's answer covered the reason WHY the Holy Spirit is full Deity in accordance with the Trinitarian doctrine, thus showing that the Holy Spirit is worthy of worship, which the true Reformed tradition should hold. To address your related question about praying to the Holy Spirit, I'll focus on the common practice (from the Reformed perspective) of how ...


6

Summary The verses below tell you clearly what to do. Use logic and reason, consult with Christians wiser than you, and test this man's words. Praise God if he passes. Rebuke the man if he does not. Modified from a previous answer of mine on testing prophets The first thing I want to say is that if your wife is a Christian with a moderately strong faith ...


6

Of course there are many specific occurrences of the Spirit speaking in the Bible. All prophecy and scripture is the Spirit speaking. Thus says the Lord, is the same as thus says the Spirit. And coming to us, he took Paul’s belt and bound his own feet and hands and said, “Thus says the Holy Spirit, ‘This is how the Jews at Jerusalem will bind the man who ...


6

Different traditions have more nuance in how they understand the trinity, but the most relevant and agreed upon part of that definition is: God is three 'persons', Father, Son, Holy Spirit, and each 'person' is clearly distinguishable from the other two, and all three exist simultaneously. Binitarianism – belief that God is a 'binitarian' being – is ...


6

Joseph Smith taught: There is a difference between the Holy Ghost and the gift of the Holy Ghost. Cornelius received the Holy Ghost before he was baptized, which was the convincing power of God unto him of the truth of the Gospel, but he could not receive the gift of the Holy Ghost until after he was baptized. Had he not taken this sign or ...


6

"Augustine says . . . (Enchiridion lxxxiii) that 'he who dies in a state of obstinacy is guilty of the sin against the Holy Ghost,' and (De Verb. Dom., Serm. lxxi) that 'impenitence is a sin against the Holy Ghost,' and (De Serm. Dom. in Monte xxii), that 'to resist fraternal goodness with the brands of envy is to sin against the Holy Ghost,' and ...


6

Jesus had two fathers. One was Joseph, his earthly adoptive father. The other is the Father, his heavenly father (and ours as well). He had no earthly biological father. That is the distinction. The Father is not Jesus' earthly father in any sense whatsoever. The person of Christ is eternally begotten of the person of the Father. That doesn't and didn't ...


6

I work for the Swedenborg Foundation and can provide this answer from Rev. James. F Lawrence, D.Min., Ph.D. Dean of the Center for Swedenborgian Studies and also Assistant Professor of Spirituality and Historical Studies at the Graduate Theological Union. We hope this helps! I would say the Holy Spirit in Swedenborg is simply the divine proceeding and ...


6

There is nothing in LDS canon about this, as far as I can tell. There are a couple statements from Joseph Smith that indicate that he felt the Holy Ghost would eventually receive a body, which I've copied from the linked article. The first is from the Encyclopedia of Joseph Smith’s Teachings: The Holy Ghost is yet a spiritual body and is waiting to take ...


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