10

St. Alphonsus of Liguori, Theologia Moralis lib. 6, 942, p. 690: A husband or wife rendering himself or herself impotent, even by licit means (e.g., fasts, etc.), sins gravely. If one cannot otherwise perform the [marriage] debt, it is licit to not observe the fasts of the Church.Peccat graviter vir vel mulier, si se impotentem reddat, etiam mediis alias ...


8

Jesus of Nazareth had been (supposedly) 'executed'. Actually he had yielded up his own life and 'expired', see all four gospels. As such, he was still 'in custody' and his body would, ordinarily, have been disposed of as an executed criminal. But Joseph of Arimathea 'begged', Mark 15:43, the body of Jesus from Pilate who gave permission to release the body ...


4

In light of Traditionis Custodes, is the TLM celebrated by a well known schismatic Priest an invalid Mass? The short answer no. The Motu Proprio Traditionis Custodes of Pope Francis deals with simply putting more restrictive measures for the Extraordinary Form of the Mass (TLM) usages. If the Extraordinary Form of the Mass is celebrated by a well known ...


3

Does the delayed burial of Jesus attest to the fact that he had no close relatives other than his mother? Before going into this question let us first see what St. John states in his Gospel. St. John was the only Apostle to witness the Crucifix of Jesus. The others had abandoned Jesus through fear of the Roman and Jewish authorities. 30 Jesus therefore, ...


3

In answer to the OP, no, the delay in burial does not attest to the fact of no close relatives. Rather, it attests to two other things. One was the fact that Jesus had been tried as a criminal, found guilty, and hung on the cross by some very powerful people. Who would stand up? Two was the fact that the authorities did not know Jesus had actually died ...


3

I can't speak for Catholics and Protestants, but as a Latter Day Saint, our view of scripture might be a bit different than others. Scriptures to us may not be as 'untouchable' as to others. To us, scripture is valued because it can contain the word of God. Though, we recognize that the words we read on the bible's pages have been through quite a lot. First, ...


3

John Owen summarizes well my belief concerning the nature of scripture: I affirm, That it is the work of the Holy Spirit to enable us to believe the Scripture to be the word of God, or the supernatural, immediate revelation of his mind unto us, and infallibly to evidence it unto our minds, so as that we may spiritually and savingly acquiesce therein. (Owen, ...


3

Do the teachings of Catholic Church prohibit the use of “Amen” for purposes other than prayers? The short answer is no. First of all, Our Lord employed Amen outside of prayer. Amen, amen I say unto you: He that believeth in me, hath everlasting life." - (John 6:47 Douay-Rheims) Jesus frequently said "Amen" ("Truly") to preface a ...


2

Short Answer The question is: How can Primacy of conscience be justified (even when wrong) above obeying certain teaching of the Catholic Church? The Catholic church recognizes that people sometimes follows erroneous conscience because of certain ignorance, and therefore differentiates between vincible ignorance (which is blameworthy) and invincible ...


2

Has the Catholic Church taken cognizance of the theory that the terminal cause of Jesus's death on the cross was heart-failure? The short answer is no! Crucifixion was a torture in itself to deliberately produce death. However some Catholic physicians have written on the minuet causes of what the crucified actually died of. In his book, A Doctor at Calvary: ...


2

What is the basis that He died of heart failure? Although, most likely the severe psychological trauma in the garden of Gethsemane took a physical toll, so did the multiple trials, the crown of thorns on his head, carrying the cross to the hill. 37 And Jesus cried out with a loud voice, and breathed His last. 38 Then the veil of the temple was torn in two ...


2

I think the term you want is: Confessional Lutheran GratefulDisciple already noted that ELCA has adopted an extremely liberal theology as of late, to the point that they are much closer to "mainstream Protestantism". If you're worried about being tarred with that particular brush, which it sounds like is the case, identifying as confessional ...


2

When reviewing the English translation of the German wikipedia article Evangelisch-lutherische Kirchen, "Evangelisch-lutherische Kirchen" is best translated as "Lutheran Protestant Church", or "Lutheran Church" for short, since in English speaking countries, a Lutheran church is automatically Protestant. Therefore it is best ...


2

I don't know if it was theological, as it was trying to fit into Roe v. Wade as settled law. Though the stare decisis view of Roe v. Wade is often debated, it is likely that it will not be rescinded. It's kind of like how the Catholic church, and other churches like the Lutheran Church, never actually renounce what was once said in terms of public pastoral ...


2

"Does an act being intrinsically evil ensure culpability?" No. A person forced to commit an intrinsic evil does not sin because sin requires consent of the will; "every sin is volutary" (St. Thomas Aquinas, Summa Theologica I-II q. 80 a. 1 co.). cf. Prümmer, O.P., Handbook of Moral Theology on human acts.


2

If predictive prophecy can be considered a "miracle" than there is one in the Lutheran church. In the Lutheran Confessions, a reference is made related to the private revelations of a Franciscan monk named John Hilten. According to the Lutheran Confessions, this monk's revelation was authenticated because he had an accurate prediction of the coming ...


2

Was Adam with Eve when the serpent tempted her? Personally, I do not believe so, but there are some Catholic intellectuals such as Msgr. Charles Pope who states that Adam was indeed present, even though Cornelius à Lapide, S.J. in his Commentary on Genesis believed in the opposite point of view, which is the traditional Catholic viewpoint. Nevertheless, ...


2

According to Catholicism, what was the basis on which traditional teachings determined the sides on which the Good Thief and the Bad Thief hang? The Church’s tradition on this subject matter is most likely taken from the fact the left in Latin is sinister, but in English it has a more morbid meaning. Sinister, today meaning evil or malevolent in some way, ...


2

How does the Catholic Church reconcile the two different narratives of behavior of the thieves in Calvary as reported in Mt 27 and Lk 23? A little background information is helpful before continuing on. The Penitent Thief, also known as the Good Thief, Wise Thief, Grateful Thief or the Thief on the Cross, is one of two unnamed thieves in Luke's account of ...


1

New Commentary on the [1983] Code of Canon Law pp. 1307,8: (2) The deceit must bear on a quality of the person "which by its very nature can gravely disturb the partnership of conjugal life." A quality of a person is an inherent or distin­guishing characteristic or trait of a person. Iso­lated actions in the past are not normally con­sidered to be ...


1

Are there instances of miracles that are officially recognized by non-Catholic denominations? The short answer seems to be yes. Many Christians have overlooked the Marian Apparitions at Zeitoun, Egypt which began in 1968 at St. Mary’s Coptic Orthodox Church. What is the most witnessed Marian apparition of the 20th century? Most would say Our Lady of Fatima ...


1

According to Catholicism and Eastern Orthodoxy, what are the strongest apologetic arguments for the divine inspiration of the deuterocanonical books? For one thing, the Early Church Fathers were much closer in time to the actual sources. Even St. Augustine listed the deuterocanonical books (and the other 66 books) as Scripture. Such a great Doctor of the ...


1

Simply by Christian principles (as you said Jesus himself elevates the Decalogue, saying it's sin not just to commit adultery, but also to look with lust). This is compatible with what Jesus said in Matthew 15:11 "What goes into someone’s mouth does not defile them, but what comes out of their mouth, that is what defiles them.”. The CCC (Catechism of ...


1

The Lutheran Church in America has various branches. The Evangelical Lutheran Church in America (ELCA), which is the largest branch in United States, was founded by mostly Scandinavians. In contrast the Lutheran Church Missouri Synod (LCMS) was founded by settlers who came from Germany in the mid to late 19th century. The LCMS Lutherans tend to downplay the ...


1

That The Catholic Church has always held to the primacy of conscience and taught that individuals must follow their consciences even when they are wrong is what Pope Gregory XVI calls, in his encyclical on Liberalism and Religious Indifferentism, Mirari Vos §14, an absurd and erroneous proposition which claims that liberty of conscience must be maintained ...


1

In Charles Rice's Fifty Question on the Natural Law he asks "How can it be right for the Pope to tell me what the natural law means? Don't I have to follow my conscience?" The TL;DR; answer is "yes, but...", then he dives into principles. I think that is applicable to your question because you're asking why it is always right to follow ...


1

What is the implication of “munus”? Before going on I wish to put forth the actual Latin text of Pope Benedict’s Resignation as well as an English translation. Below is the full text of Pope Emeritus Benedict’s speech in Latin and English: Fratres carissimi, Non solum propter tres canonizationes ad hoc Consistorium vos convocavi, sed etiam ut vobis ...


1

Does the Catholic Church have an official position on medical passes (“vaccine passes”) being required to attend Mass? The short answer is no. I rather doubt that the sacraments or attending Mass will ever be for the double vaccinated only. As for the moment, the Church encourages the faithful to get vaccinated, but it will never publicly mandate it as a ...


1

What is meant by an "official" position? It seems to me that it is fairly clear from the Note on the morality of using some anti-Covid-19 vaccines that the decision to receive a vaccine or not is something that should not be forced upon an individual. At the same time, practical reason makes evident that vaccination is not, as a rule, a moral ...


1

Basically, you are asking two separate questions here: Do Catholics have to request a religious exception for matters of conscience from their parish priest? Is there any reason that an individual Catholic shouldn't seek a religious exemption from a member of the clergy who shares their concerns with the nature of the vaccines, even if is not their parish ...


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