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46

Simply put: Contemporary worship services stereotypically include both free-form prayers and music accompanied by guitars. Traditional worship services stereotypically include the recitation of set prayers, and do not use guitars. In the joke, Mary makes a slippery-slope argument: that if she diverges from what is "traditional" in one area (changing ...


31

If they were wearing name tags, they were probably official LDS missionaries. Even if not, Latter-day Saints are allowed to (and in fact, are encouraged to) proselytize informally and refer potential converts to official LDS missionaries. The LDS have a specific set of procedures and practices for seeking out, encouraging, vetting, and accepting new members, ...


23

According to this answer to a question I asked on the Biblical Hermeneutics SE, the original New Testament Greek does not have a phrase like "vain repetition"; instead, the word used, βαττολογησητε ("battologesete") simply means "to babble" or "to sound like one who is stammering". The word is onomatopoietic, and the sense seems to be "using words [not ...


23

Protestants do not see that Christ ever instructed his followers to pray (only to baptize) "in the name of the Father, and of the Son, and of the Holy Spirit". On the other hand, Christians are repeatedly called to invoke the name of the Lord: To the church of God in Corinth, to those sanctified in Christ Jesus and called to be his holy people, ...


16

Sub Tuum Praesidium The earliest known, extant petition prayer to Mary the Θεοτόκος (Theotokos), or Dei Genetrix (the Greek and Latin, respectively, for 'God-bearer' or 'Birthgiver-of-God') is found in an Egyptian papyrus from the 3rd century (commonly dated to around A.D. 250-280 but as late as 300—I could not find a dating later than the 4th century) and ...


15

It appears to be a custom that predates establishment of the Christian religion, but you can find a scriptural example in 1 Corinthians 11:23-25(KJV) That the Lord Jesus the same night in which he was betrayed took bread: And when he had given thanks, he brake it, and said, Take, eat: this is my body, which is broken for you: this do in remembrance ...


14

There is definitely precedent: As Christians, we should be following the example set by Christ, who gave thanks before feeding the multitudes in Matthew 14:19-21 and Matthew 15:34-36. He also did so in Luke 24:30. Matthew 14:19-21 King James Version (KJV) 19 And he commanded the multitude to sit down on the grass, and took the five loaves, and ...


14

Protestantism and Tradition I'm coming at this answer from a Protestant perspective. Since I've seen a variety of folk in my branch of Christianity hold hands during prayer, I'll assume you've been observing my people. We've inherited from Paul a suspicion of traditional rites and practices. When we do observe some custom, we are very likely to either: ...


14

When Jesus fed the 5,000, the Gospel of John records that Jesus took the bread and gave thanks: Jesus then took the loaves, and when he had given thanks, he distributed them to those who were seated. So also the fish, as much as they wanted. John 6:11 ESV Additionally, in Mark's account of Jesus feeding the 4,000, Jesus again gives thanks, presumably in ...


14

The Bible in no place says that you can possibly pray too much. In fact, it says just the opposite. Not only in the passage in Luke, but also in 1 Thessalonialns 5:17, which says we should be praying continually. Like most "contradictions' this one is simple to resolve by showing that the problem arises from taking verses out of context. (See Rules ...


13

Indeed, Jesus did prayer to his Father, as His Father. John 17 “Father, the hour has come. Glorify your Son, that your Son may glorify you. For you granted him authority over all people that he might give eternal life to all those you have given him. Now this is eternal life: that they know you, the only true God, and Jesus Christ, whom you have sent. I ...


13

To which Saints may a Catholic pray, and when can this begin? Actually a catholic can privately pray to anyone whom he/she thinks can intercede on their behalf. In fact Catholics do not see any difference in asking you to pray for me and asking my dead grandma (if I believe she is in heaven or purgatory) to pray for me. Is it restricted to only those who ...


13

Intercession is not the same as mediation! As other answers have said perfectly adequately, there is plenty of biblical support for interceding for one another and the example of the Apostle Paul requesting this intercession from other (living!) saints; although there is no particular scriptural warrant to explicitly endorse asking for such intercession ...


13

To answer the question, it is important to understand that Catholics (as well as the Eastern Orthodox and other eastern churches) make a sharp distinction between adoration (or worship), which is directed only to God, and veneration, which refers to the honor given to the saints. When Catholics (and Orthodox) pray to Mary and the other saints, it is never ...


12

Protestantism is so broad that you can't avoid getting a broad answer. As the protestant church has no official head there is no official answer and there was never an official LOTH rejection meeting. Furthermore, some Protestant denominations still do practice LOTH. The best you can do in this case is summarize the most common Protestant beliefs and come up ...


12

A petition, just as it is in the political arena, is a request to a sovereign to take some action. Any request made of God, is thus a petition. Prayer, on the other hand, is any communication with God. As such, all petitions presented to God are delivered as prayer, but there are forms of prayer (glorification, confession, thanksgiving) that are not ...


12

There are a variety of things going on here. (FWIW, I'm an Anglican who holds to the Catholic faith, so I'm not explaining my own beliefs here. I'll try as best I can to give a fair account of others' beliefs.) Idolatry Many Protestants believe that prayer should only be directed at God and that prayer to anything else is ipso facto idolatry. To pray to ...


12

First, it is valuable in this answer to distinguish between the pious practice of individuals, and small groups of believers, on the one hand, and the official formularies of the larger group, on the other. It may be that among Roman Catholics, there are those who use the full Trinitarian formula to begin and end an individual prayer, and perhaps every ...


12

The earliest may not be easy to find, but I'll put a marker down. St Ephraim the Syrian, who died in 373, prayed: Ye victorious martyrs who endured torments gladly for the sake of the God and Saviour; ye who have boldness of speech towards the Lord Himself; ye saints, intercede for us who are timid and sinful men, full of sloth, that the grace of Christ may ...


11

There are countless works already done on Trinity. Inspired by all these existing works, here is how we may address the question to whom Jesus prays to. Jesus never said "I am God" nor "I am the Father" but said "I and my Father are one". The New Testament always address Jesus as the Lord, the Christ, the Word of God and the Son of God. One with Father? ...


11

The point of this passage is that the petitioner is asking for Mary, Theotokos, to pray to her Son, Jesus Christ, to assist them at that time, and at their death. It is hoped that her prayer and support will assist with the life of the petitioner, and assist them with grace to meet the Lord with final perseverance and strength. While the process of death ...


10

St. Joseph is the terror of Demons because all of demons effort is nullified if one seeks refuge to St. Joseph and also because he is pure, and demons cannot stand against his purity. Even though there is no official dogmatic pronunciation in this regard by the Catholic church, numerous private revelationsexample and traditions have held that St. Joseph, ...


10

What does it mean to pray "in Jesus' name"? Is it a magical formula that guarantees that your prayer will be heard? For example: Dear God, please give me a new bike and a chocolate cake and a magical telephone and an elephant. Also, please kill all the bad people. In Jesus' name, Amen. Does that prayer make more sense because it has "In ...


10

There is one God who has revealed himself in three persons. The vast majority of Christians across all major sects agree that Jesus is both the Son of God and God. This has been articulated many mays, but is not easy to explain in the confines of language. He is not the "son" as is a physical offspring as the result of sexual relations, but in another sense ...


10

One of my churches used this passage when requesting all men remove their hats during times of prayer: 1 Cor. 11:4 Every man praying or prophesying, having his head covered, dishonoureth his head. In certain cultures, it's possible that the hat is removed and head is bowed as a sign of respect and not necessarily from this verse.


10

There are two main Protestant arguments against asking the deceased saints to intercede for us: It is seen as contradicting the Bible's prohibition on contacting the dead. These are found most clearly in the Jewish Law, which is not binding on Christians, but is still considered to be solid wisdom in this case. Do not turn to mediums or seek out ...


9

My understanding from growing up in an Anglican church: We pray to God the Father. He is the one that answers our prayers. Not a perfect verse for this, but the only one I could think of: “Again, truly I [Jesus] tell you that if two of you on earth agree about anything they ask for, it will be done for them by my Father in heaven" (Matthew 18:19 NIV) ...


9

God does answer every prayer, but the answer may be “No, I don’t think so.” Mgr Robert Mercer said as much in a sermon (at the funeral of a priest who, gravely ill, died a few days after ordination): It goes without saying that we are disappointed that God gave no miracle of healing. Jenny and Philip went to Walsingham. They prayed. We all prayed. Doctors ...


9

There is indeed much evidence that silent prayer was taught and practiced in the early church. Several examples from the first few centuries will demonstrate this: Clement of Alexandria (150–215) writes: Prayer is, then, to speak more boldly, converse with God. Though whispering, consequently, and not opening the lips, we speak in silence, yet we cry ...


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