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45

Simply put: Contemporary worship services stereotypically include both free-form prayers and music accompanied by guitars. Traditional worship services stereotypically include the recitation of set prayers, and do not use guitars. In the joke, Mary makes a slippery-slope argument: that if she diverges from what is "traditional" in one area (changing ...


33

If they were wearing name tags, they were probably official LDS missionaries. Even if not, Latter-day Saints are allowed to (and in fact, are encouraged to) proselytize informally and refer potential converts to official LDS missionaries. The LDS have a specific set of procedures and practices for seeking out, encouraging, vetting, and accepting new members, ...


23

According to this answer to a question I asked on the Biblical Hermeneutics SE, the original New Testament Greek does not have a phrase like "vain repetition"; instead, the word used, βαττολογησητε ("battologesete") simply means "to babble" or "to sound like one who is stammering". The word is onomatopoietic, and the sense seems to be "using words [not ...


23

Protestants do not see that Christ ever instructed his followers to pray (only to baptize) "in the name of the Father, and of the Son, and of the Holy Spirit". On the other hand, Christians are repeatedly called to invoke the name of the Lord: To the church of God in Corinth, to those sanctified in Christ Jesus and called to be his holy people, together ...


19

This can be answered by answering a more general question: what does "in someone's (anyone's) name" mean? It means to act by proxy, on the authority of something or someone greater than yourself. It's a concept that our culture has kind of lost, though it still exists as a storytelling trope. When a medieval herald reads a proclamation "in the name of the ...


18

Even if we can't pray away someone else's free will or convince God to bend the rules regarding the requirements of salvation, there can still be merit in praying on behalf of others with a slightly different attitude. Perhaps "let them have experiences that will lead them to the truth," or "let their hearts be softened, that they may give heed to the Holy ...


18

The closest would be the model prayer given in Matthew chapter 6 as part of the Sermon on the Mount. This prayer is understood by most to be an example, or model, rather than something to be repeated verbatim. So, no, there are no specific mandatory prayers given in scripture, other than that we are to pray — and to pray without ceasing. Mandatory ...


17

Both Genesis 6:5 and 1 Chronicles 28:9 (and myriad other passages) indicate God can understand our thoughts. So, can God "hear" our silent prayers? Of course! Is it better to pray out loud than to pray silently? Since there seem to be no instances in the Bible of a recorded silent prayer (other than in the Epistles where Paul writes how he prays for people,...


16

I find it curious that no one mentions the one instance where a prayer is explicitly mentioned as being silent and it was answered. 1 Samuel 1:9-19 (NLT)  9 Once after a sacrificial meal at Shiloh, Hannah got up and went to pray. Eli the priest was sitting at his customary place beside the entrance of the Tabernacle. 10 Hannah was in deep anguish, ...


16

Sub Tuum Praesidium The earliest known, extant petition prayer to Mary the Θεοτόκος (Theotokos), or Dei Genetrix (the Greek and Latin, respectively, for 'God-bearer' or 'Birthgiver-of-God') is found in an Egyptian papyrus from the 3rd century (commonly dated to around A.D. 250-280 but as late as 300—I could not find a dating later than the 4th century) and ...


15

There is definitely precedent: As Christians, we should be following the example set by Christ, who gave thanks before feeding the multitudes in Matthew 14:19-21 and Matthew 15:34-36. He also did so in Luke 24:30. Matthew 14:19-21 King James Version (KJV) 19 And he commanded the multitude to sit down on the grass, and took the five loaves, and ...


15

It appears to be a custom that predates establishment of the Christian religion, but you can find a scriptural example in 1 Corinthians 11:23-25(KJV) That the Lord Jesus the same night in which he was betrayed took bread: And when he had given thanks, he brake it, and said, Take, eat: this is my body, which is broken for you: this do in remembrance ...


14

Nehemiah 2:4 (NWT) In turn the king said to me: “What is this that you are seeking to secure?” At once I prayed to the God of the heavens. It is not expected that Nehemiah prayed out loud to God in front of king Artaxerxes, but he probably made silent prayer.


14

Protestantism and Tradition I'm coming at this answer from a Protestant perspective. Since I've seen a variety of folk in my branch of Christianity hold hands during prayer, I'll assume you've been observing my people. We've inherited from Paul a suspicion of traditional rites and practices. When we do observe some custom, we are very likely to either: ...


14

When Jesus fed the 5,000, the Gospel of John records that Jesus took the bread and gave thanks: Jesus then took the loaves, and when he had given thanks, he distributed them to those who were seated. So also the fish, as much as they wanted. John 6:11 ESV Additionally, in Mark's account of Jesus feeding the 4,000, Jesus again gives thanks, presumably in ...


14

The Bible in no place says that you can possibly pray too much. In fact, it says just the opposite. Not only in the passage in Luke, but also in 1 Thessalonialns 5:17, which says we should be praying continually. Like most "contradictions' this one is simple to resolve by showing that the problem arises from taking verses out of context. (See Rules ...


13

The Book of Esther's legitimacy as part of the canon of Christian scripture has been the subject of debate because there is no direct reference to God. The compilation of the original Bible is largely obscured in history (e.g. the Song of Solomon has been likewise disputed because of its romantic content), but Esther may have been included because of its ...


13

Indeed, Jesus did prayer to his Father, as His Father. John 17 “Father, the hour has come. Glorify your Son, that your Son may glorify you. For you granted him authority over all people that he might give eternal life to all those you have given him. Now this is eternal life: that they know you, the only true God, and Jesus Christ, whom you have sent. I ...


13

To which Saints may a Catholic pray, and when can this begin? Actually a catholic can privately pray to anyone whom he/she thinks can intercede on their behalf. In fact Catholics do not see any difference in asking you to pray for me and asking my dead grandma (if I believe she is in heaven or purgatory) to pray for me. Is it restricted to only those who ...


13

Intercession is not the same as mediation! As other answers have said perfectly adequately, there is plenty of biblical support for interceding for one another and the example of the Apostle Paul requesting this intercession from other (living!) saints; although there is no particular scriptural warrant to explicitly endorse asking for such intercession ...


13

To answer the question, it is important to understand that Catholics (as well as the Eastern Orthodox and other eastern churches) make a sharp distinction between adoration (or worship), which is directed only to God, and veneration, which refers to the honor given to the saints. When Catholics (and Orthodox) pray to Mary and the other saints, it is never ...


12

The sinners prayer has no place in Christ's Gospel Why did Christ die? Have you thought about that? If Christ was somebody that everybody loved, why was the entire town chanting that He be killed? Have you thought about that? John 15:25 NKJV But this happened that the word might be fulfilled which is written in their law, ‘They hated Me without a ...


12

Don't get hung up on words; prayer should come from the heart. I believe that prayer needs to originate from the heart. Because of that, we shouldn't get hung up on words. I believe that rote prayers and repeated prayers can be just as effective and just as "heard by God" as prayers that are unscripted. It's about the state of your heart whether God ...


12

Realistically, there are just 4 possibilities: Christians and Moslems are praying to the same God. We all basically believe the same things and believe in the same God. Christians and Moslems are praying to the same God. One or the other (or both) have wrong and confused ideas about God, but God is understanding of our ignorance. There is more than one God, ...


12

Protestantism is so broad that you can't avoid getting a broad answer. As the protestant church has no official head there is no official answer and there was never an official LOTH rejection meeting. Furthermore, some Protestant denominations still do practice LOTH. The best you can do in this case is summarize the most common Protestant beliefs and come up ...


12

There are a variety of things going on here. (FWIW, I'm an Anglican who holds to the Catholic faith, so I'm not explaining my own beliefs here. I'll try as best I can to give a fair account of others' beliefs.) Idolatry Many Protestants believe that prayer should only be directed at God and that prayer to anything else is ipso facto idolatry. To pray to ...


12

First, it is valuable in this answer to distinguish between the pious practice of individuals, and small groups of believers, on the one hand, and the official formularies of the larger group, on the other. It may be that among Roman Catholics, there are those who use the full Trinitarian formula to begin and end an individual prayer, and perhaps every ...


12

The earliest may not be easy to find, but I'll put a marker down. St Ephraim the Syrian, who died in 373, prayed: Ye victorious martyrs who endured torments gladly for the sake of the God and Saviour; ye who have boldness of speech towards the Lord Himself; ye saints, intercede for us who are timid and sinful men, full of sloth, that the grace of Christ ...


11

Let's look at the immediate context: “And when you pray, you must not be like the hypocrites. For they love to stand and pray in the synagogues and at the street corners, that they may be seen by others. Truly, I say to you, they have received their reward. But when you pray, go into your room and shut the door and pray to your Father who is in secret. ...


11

Muslims believe Allah and Jehovah are One From the perspective of the Muslim, when they are praying to Allah, they believe they are praying to the same person whom Christians would call God. And do not dispute with the followers of the Book except by what is best, except those of them who act unjustly, and say: We believe in that which has been revealed ...


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