4

What Moses saw is described and defined in Numbers 12:8. And he said, Hear now my words: If there be a prophet among you, I the LORD will make myself known unto him in a vision, and will speak unto him in a dream. My servant Moses is not so, who is faithful in all mine house. With him will I speak mouth to mouth, even apparently, and not in dark speeches; ...


4

There are many possibilities here. As @Dottard notes, 'non-trinitarian' encompasses a large number of views. IMO it is very difficult to maintain a position that Jesus isn't divine ("those who deny the divinity of Jesus in general") while also taking the Gospels seriously - the question rather is whether Jesus is God properly speaking or divine in ...


3

Both God and Jesus can be understood to send the angel, because Jesus is at God's right-hand (Matthew 26:64) and is God's representative - God does things through Jesus. The NT generally, and Revelation in this case, repeatedly and clearly distinguishes between Jesus and God. Jesus is the 'Son of God', Jesus says 'My God, my God'. Jesus says 'Your God and my ...


2

The simple answer is based on the examples the text provides both in OT and NT usage of titles. Trying to prove anything by what title God has or is given to others including Christ is a curious exercise but accomplishes little of any value. King of Kings, Saviour, Lord, 'First and Last' is applied to both God and Jesus at different times and even other men ...


1

Any understanding must be true to two things, The text in focus All other scripture must be accommodated and not comprised or ignored. Any interpretation must maintain these two standards. While many translations have attempted to decipher this verse in isolation, we must include other texts before we draw any conclusions. Jesus is holy, without sin, and ...


1

In the New Testament, we learn that Moses and Jacob did not see God in some abstract, intangible way. As John opens his gospel, he informs us that “no one has ever seen God,” but that Jesus, “the only God, who is at the Father’s side, he has made him known” (John 1:18). This echoes Jesus’ statement in John 6:46: “Not that anyone has seen the Father except he ...


1

The question is akin to asking why belt loops don't also have zippers. In other words, the purpose of each book is not to duplicate what others have said, although there is some overlap, but to give the whole picture in their own way. As well, we can't assume that just because one book mentions ABC, but others do not, that ABC somehow is less important; it ...


1

The whole point of John's Gospel is to show its readers (and listeners) that Jesus is Christ, the Son of God (20:31), which goes back to Psalm 2 where God installs David to sonship i.e kingship, where David "ascends" to the throne, as it were, as a type of Christ. The means by which John aspires to prove Jesus' Christhood, are signs. Some pointing ...


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