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Discussing "Whether Christ was the cause of His own Resurrection?" (Summa Theologica III q. 53 a. 4), St. Thomas Aquinas writes (co.): in consequence of death Christ's Godhead was not separated from His soul, nor from His flesh. Consequently, both the soul and the flesh of the dead Christ can be considered in two respects: (1) in respect of His ...


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How do Trinitarian Christians explain this to people who neither understand nor believe the Trinity? As an orthodoxly trinitarian Christian, I can only answer by saying how I would answer a non-trinitarian-believing person who asked the question, ‘Who resurrected Jesus – the Father, the Son or the Holy Spirit?’. This would not be with a view to getting them ...


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Orthodox Trinitarians believe that the Son and the Spirit are eternally dependant on the Father, just as the heat and light of the fire are distinct from one another, contemporaneous with, yet dependant on, the fire. Just as the light can say "I live because of the fire" the Son can say "I live because of the Father." Yet there is no fire ...


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For as the Father has life in himself, so he has granted the Son also to have life in himself. - John 5:26 This Scripture is not explaining how Jesus the incarnation of the Word derives his life in a physical body. Of course all living things have God as the source of their life and without God nothing would live. These all look to you, to give them their ...


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To find the Jehovah's Witness perspective, I looked at their “Insight On The Scriptures” book, vol. 1. The first indication is that they have no subject heading, “Gospel”. They seem to avoid that word, replacing it with “the good news” instead. Their New World Translation of those verses you ask about read, “For I put you on notice, brothers, that the good ...


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Jehovah's Witnesses believe that Jesus was a man during his time on earth, but not just any ordinary man. He was the Christ, he was God's Son, and he was perfect. What Jesus taught was not of his own originality but was from God, his Father. (John 8:28; John 14:10) Before Jesus came to earth and after he was resurrected, he was a mighty spirit creature. The ...


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It's not hard to see why the Trinity is confusing (it's a concept we can't entirely grasp as finite beings), however the Trinity is indivisible, so trying to say that one member of the Trinity did something the others did not isn't correct. I think AW Tozer's explanation in his book The Knowledge of the Holy is helpful. Quotes from Chapter 4: The Holy ...


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What Jesus was saying both in John 2:19 and in John 10:17-18, is that his resurrection depended on him, in the sense that sinlessness of his thoughts and actions, and his obedience unto death to the Father was the necessary (NOT sufficient) condition of his own resurrection, that is for the Father to approve of him by raising him from the dead (Rom 10:9). ...


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"We uphold or establish the law" or in greek "make it to stand". Given the immediate context along with entire book of Galatians I think he's saying that we've made the misunderstood purpose of the law to stand or be made clear. Once it's true purpose is clear we can see why it's valuable and serves it's function. Function of the law: ...


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How do Evangelicals understand “holy children” in 1 Corinthians 7:14, with respect to children dying in infancy? This is a passage where Evangelicals differ, and where Reformed Evangelicals differ amongst themselves. I use the term “Reformed” in the sense of someone who believes in the Doctrines of Grace which most of the Reformers believed but which today ...


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Even if "Matthew" is a semitic name, it doesn't negate the possibility of name changing. The name changing from a semitic name to another one is not unusual. We recognize the name changing of Abram to Abraham and Simon to Cepha. Why not Levi to Matthew (Mattija? = Gift of Yahweh)? Moreover, the fact that the name Levi was mentioned only once in the ...


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