19

I would say that baptism is still highly "necessary", since Jesus Himself, in his final directions to His disciples, told them to: Go therefore and make disciples of all the nations, baptizing them in the name of the Father and the Son and the Holy Spirit (emphasis added) and the parallel: Go into all the world and preach the gospel to all creation. ...


18

Catholics reconcile the two beliefs by being allowed to believe in evolution, but required to believe in the existence of Adam and Eve. For the purposes of this discussion, evolution is the scientific hypothesis that the physical bodies of various living beings have developed from those of other living beings of different species. To believe in evolution ...


17

The Bible is very clear that Jesus did not begin to exist in the womb of Mary. As the Second Person of the Trinity, He exists outside of the physical universe of time, space, and matter and with the Father and Spirit created the physical world. He is holy, was holy, and will always be holy... and sinless and righteous and pure and blameless. When Mary ...


15

Q. Biblical Basis for Biblical literalists: A. None. Catholics believe that Mary is a type prefigured in the Old Testament of the Ark of the Covenant. The basis for this belief is rooted in scripture as firmly as Mary is rooted in scripture. God created His mother, and in so doing He created His mother as a fit dwelling place, like the Holy of Holies. ...


14

The idea that "Jesus was plan B" doesn't make sense from a theological or a logical standpoint. If God is Omnisicient, then He knew what would happen before He created everything. He knew Adam and Eve would choose to disobey when tempted. To claim that Jesus was "Plan B" would indicate that God is not Omniscient, or that God failed. Both go against ...


13

Per the Nicene Creed, He was begotten not made. Conceived by the Holy Spirit, but born of the Virgin Mary. The idea is that since he was born of woman but not man, as God's son, he did not inherit sin. Catholic doctrine goes further, adding the idea of an immaculate conception - for Mary - that Jesus might be born sinless. ( I know, I always thought that ...


12

I didn't get to vote or have any say in my forebears leaving their homelands and emigrating to the United States (or, The New World, as it was then known in Europe); nor did I have any say in whether or not to participate in their bloodline. Yet they represented me when they did it. If we take the Bible to be God's word, and we believe that God cannot lie, ...


11

All of Humanity is (Individually) Made in God's Image Genesis does not seem to leave the matter open to much interpretation. Genesis 1:26-27 NASB Then God said, "Let Us make man in Our image, according to Our likeness; and let them rule over the fish of the sea and over the birds of the sky and over the cattle and over all the earth, and over every ...


10

Martin Luther and John Calvin followed the tradition of St. Augustine in abhorring any theoretical belief in a state of sinlessness, whether for a moment, day, year, or whatever. They seem to have regarded sinless perfection as the vain imagination of human pride and a result of our sinfulness.  For example, commenting on Psalms  106:6, Calvin said: How ...


10

Paul does say that "the whole creation" (including animals, presumably) suffers because of the fall: For the creation waits with eager longing for the revealing of the sons of God. For the creation was subjected to futility, not willingly, but because of him who subjected it, in hope that the creation itself will be set free from its bondage to corruption ...


9

Catholicism teaches that we were in a perpetual state of grace and "did something" that opposed God's commands, which took us out of that state of grace. The rest is just footnotes. For Catholics, we subscribe to the notion that much of the early Old Testament is not a literal "this happened, then that happened" scenario. Genesis is a prime example of ...


8

I think that the best answer here is that the Scriptures are not entirely clear on how original sin is transmitted. One thing that we do know (or believe the scriptures to teach) is: The sin nature is passed on to us from our fathers and not our mothers Sin entered the world through Adam - Romans 5:12 - not Eve who sinned first. More directly taught in ...


8

There's one possible answer to this apparent dilemma here. I've heard this repeated on Christian radio stations by protestant preachers from various denominations. The basic outline of the answer is as follows: Sinful heredity is passed through the blood. Since Jesus was conceived of the Holy Spirit, there was no corruption from the man. The blood of a ...


8

The way I understand it (and the way I've always seen it taught, whether at my Church, or in various other sermons/articles) is: We inherit a sinful nature, meaning that we have a predilection for sin. The evidence is pretty clear from observation. Nobody has to teach a baby how to be selfish, it's part of our nature. (Some would call it evolutionary ...


8

The Catholic answer, as best I can. Firstly, if your question means to ask, can the current lineage of humanity transition into a state of complete grace, free from the burden of original sin or the fallen nature of the world, the answer is a simple no. The doctrine of original sin precludes it: it's a fallen world. And God has already revealed a different ...


8

The Catholic Church certainly teaches that Christ is the actual physical offspring of Mary; that is, that he is genetically descended from Mary: The Holy Spirit, “the Lord, the giver of Life,” is sent to sanctify the womb of the Virgin Mary and divinely fecundate it, causing her to conceive the eternal Son of the Father in a humanity drawn from her own. (...


7

Paul outlines this a bit in Romans 5 in constrasting the role of Adam as representative vs. Christ as representative (emphasis mine). Romans 5:12-21 12Therefore, just as sin came into the world through one man, and death through sin, and so death spread to all men because all sinned— 13for sin indeed was in the world before the law was given, but ...


7

There's certainly no doctrine that says it's possible. The very idea would be in direct opposition to the concept of Original Sin, which states that we're all born sinners because we inherited our sinful nature. If the doctrine of original sin is true (and since it's the starting point of your question, let's assume, for the sake of this answer, that it ...


7

The biblical basis is repeated like a refrain throughout the first chapter of Genesis (Douay-Rheims translation, my emphases): [10] And God called the dry land, Earth; and the gathering together of the waters, he called Seas. And God saw that it was good. ... [12] And the earth brought forth the green herb, and such as yieldeth seed according to its ...


7

The passage was written after his conversion, and there is no indication whatsoever that Paul was speaking in the past tense. Therefore, following the basic rules of interpretation, (particularly #3, 5, and 8) he is speaking about after he was saved. Those eight rules are copied from the Apologetics Research page below: 1 The rule of DEFINITION: What ...


7

Reformed catechisms make it clear that all of Adam's (ordinary) descendants are conceived and born spiritually dead. First, a translation of Q&A 7 of the Heidelberg Catechism: Q. Then where does this corrupt human nature come from? A. The fall and disobedience of our first parents, Adam and Eve, in Paradise. This fall has so poisoned our nature ...


7

According to the Catholic Church (Council of Trent's Decree Concerning Original Sin): this sin of Adam…in its origin is one, and being transfused into all by propagation, not by imitation [of the parents' vices, bad example, etc.], is in each one as his own St. Thomas Aquinas, in Summa Theologica I-II q. 81 a. 1 ("Whether the first sin of our first ...


6

Genesis 1 never calls humans or human bodies "perfect", it does near the end of the chapter call all of creation "very good." We also have no indication from scripture about increasing amounts of genetic imperfections as humanity survived though the ages, so that might infer that we are trying to read into the scripture something it never set out for or was ...


6

Catholics (i.e., Western or Latin -- I belong to this group) believe that original sin entails actually inheriting the burden of Adam's Sin, which is mortal sin keeping us from entering heaven without a method of acquiring sanctifying grace, such as baptism. Original sin also threw all of nature into discord, and is the source of man's concupiscence. The ...


6

The Bible doesn't itself have anything to say on the subject of Mary's conception (or birth), so the idea must have come from an outside tradition. I argued in a related question that Mary's honor needed to be defended at a very early stage in the Church's history. But the Immaculate Conception doctrine came much later. However, the doctrine seems to ...


6

There's not much consensus on this. As with all answers on this site dealing with the subject of Creationism, there's a wide array of opinion on the subject. Reading the text, in and of itself, without any external verses, interpretation, or debate over scientific validity of the claim certainly makes it appear as if Adam and Eve weren't created to be ...


6

It is generally a very bad idea to be basing any kind of argument on a single bible verse. The meaning of verses depends very much on the context in which they are written. You always need to be looking at the surrounding passage, and often the whole book that they are written in. In this case the passage from Ezekiel is talking about punishment for ...


6

Some groups teach that baptism is not necessary because it is a work, and we are saved on Faith alone. Most of the time, these groups will instead use something called the "Sinner's Prayer", which is only shown in scripture at best a single time (Luke 18:10-14 ...and it's debatable whether this is even the same thing). Aside from this single mention, the ...


6

Orthodoxy has a Tradition of the Dormition of Mary wherein it is belived that she didn't die but merely fell asleep and was assumed into Heaven. Catholic teaching neither affirms nor contradicts the Dormition but we have another tradition which is written in one of the apocryphal gospels ascribed to St. Thomas but written hundreds of years a after his death. ...


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