18

Calvin did not like appealing to any tradition or authority other than Scripture. He asserts that the Bible teaches that all have sinned and that all continue to sin, and on that basis each facet of Mariology falls down like dominoes (except perpetual virginity, which he neither defends nor denies based on what he perceives as Scriptural silence). In ...


16

If we accept the bible teaching that Mary/Joseph had children, then they would have been younger than Jesus. In the question, the age of Jesus was 12. The oldest sibling was probably no older than 10 at that time. Is not this the carpenter, the son of Mary, the brother of James, and Joses, and of Juda, and Simon? and are not his sisters here with us? ...


11

Protestant arguments for the doctrine can be divided up into 3 categories. The Bible allows for it The bible does not indicate Mary had other children after Jesus. When Matthew 13:55 (as well as Mark 6:3, John 7:3-5, Acts 1:14, 1 Corinthians 9:5, and Galations 1:19) speak of the "brothers" of Christ, the Greek word used is 'adelphos'. The Old Testament ...


10

For many the miracle of the Virgin Birth is one thing, but lifelong abstinence from sexuality is impossible to accept. The lives of monastics and ascetics around the world and throughout history attest to the fact that it is possible. Sexual purity is only one of many challenges set for these spiritual warriors, and for many, perhaps most of them, it is not ...


10

Even before Augustine, St. Ambrose of Milan and St. Jerome used this verse in support of the dogma of the Perpetual virginity of Mary. Probably St. Augustine learned from his teacher St. Ambrose of Milan. Some quite emphatically understand this closed gate through which only the Lord God of Israel passes … as the Virgin Mary, who remains a Virgin before and ...


10

ειπεν δε μαριαμ προς τον αγγελον πως εσται τουτο -επει- ανδρα ου γινωσκω Luke 1:34 - TR (Stephens 1550, Beza 1598, Elzevir 1624 and Scrivener 1894 are all identical.) Then said Mary unto the angel, How shall this be, seeing I know not a man? KJV The Greek conjunction ἐπεί epei (see Strong 1893) cannot be manipulated into meaning something with regard to a ...


9

As with many doctrines in the first few hundred years of the church, they tended not to be explicitly defined until heretics arose forcing the church to define doctrine. This is why history is scarce on people speaking of this doctrine until the Antidicomarites show up in the mid to late 300s. With that said, here's the records we have: ~100 AD: Ignatius ...


9

I believe the O.P.'s question can be interpreted as, “Why is belief in Mary’s perpetual virginity considered so important that the Church makes it an excommunicable offense (heresy) to deny it?” The first observation to make is that all Marian dogmas have their root in the fundamental Marian dogma, which is that she is Theotokos, the Mother of God. This ...


8

Isaiah 66:7 foretells the painless virgin birth: "she brought forth; Before her pain came, she gave birth to a boy"; So painless birth is scriptural and that is how the Catholic Church interprets it. And All the Church Fathers before AD 600 believed that Mary’s delivery was painlesssrc. But what about the pain of the women in Revelation? It can be ...


8

The first part of The Gospel of James, an apocryphal Gospel "contains the story of the unique birth of Mary to Anna and her childhood and dedication to the temple". Similarly The Gospel of Pseudo-Matthew confirms "Mary entering service as a temple virgin". David Hughes gives a fascinating historical background on this subject where he ...


6

Did the Herodian Temple have virgins? The answer is almost certainly no. The only real support for Jewish temple virgins is found in Roman Catholic writings in support of the Catholic doctrine of the perpetual virginity of Mary. This doctrine has no basis in the canonical scriptures, but only in non-canonical early writings, most of which were influenced ...


6

The harmonization would be that the Gospel of Matthew is divinely inspired Sacred Scripture, while the Protoevangelium of James is merely pious tradition. In case of nonconformity between the two, Matthew takes precedence.


6

Yes; Catholicism teaches that Joseph and Mary had a true marriage. In the first place, consummation is not required for a marriage to be valid in the Catholic Church. What is necessary is (more or less) that the man and woman vow to be with each other, as one, forever; and that they intend to be together for the purpose of having and raising children. In ...


6

When one way of interpreting a passage is absurd, that shows we aren't to interpret it that way. Obviously she didn't think the angel was just telling her she'd conceive a baby with Joseph or else she wouldn't have said what she said. So she clearly understood the angel was telling her she would soon have a baby without having slept with Joseph, and hence ...


5

It is funny to me that the Bible does not mention in any prophecy that the mother of the Messiah would be a redeemer or mediator or queen of anything. All biblical scripture before Jesus points directly to Him, and all scripture after Jesus tell us about his ministry and finished work on the cross. This man made belief that Mary is all these things is not ...


5

I hope you don't mind an answer from a Catholic, seeing we agree on this with the Orthodox Christians. To ask why something needs to be the case, or the truth, is strange. But I see you are asking why it is so integral that Mary be believed to be ever-virgin, or, perpetual virgin, not why it is true. The answer is because it is true. That is, because it's ...


5

Among other things, the Ever-Virginity of the Theotokos is understood to be the fulfillment of a prophesy by Ezekiel (44:2)1: This gate shall be shut, it shall not be opened, and no man shall enter in by it; because the LORD, the God of Israel, hath entered in by it, therefore it shall be shut. This meaning is ascribed to the verse by a number of ...


5

From the Gospel of St. Luke: 41 And it came to pass, that, when Elisabeth heard the salutation of Mary, the babe leaped in her womb; and Elisabeth was filled with the Holy Ghost: 42 And she spake out with a loud voice, and said, Blessed [art] thou among women, and blessed [is] the fruit of thy womb. 43 And whence [is] this to me, that the mother of my Lord ...


5

This is a very weak argument for the perpetual virginity of Mary. This verse uses a simile to say that Israel's mourning for their God-Messiah will be like that of parents who have lost their only child. It makes no claim whatsoever about Mary. The proposed argument takes a figurative use of language about one subject (the weeping of Israel collectively and ...


5

The sense of Zech 12:10 "only" is an expression of one of a kind. Here is another use as regards Abraham and Isaac. And he said, Take now thy son, thine only son Isaac, whom thou lovest, and get thee into the land of Moriah; and offer him there for a burnt offering upon one of the mountains which I will tell thee of. The word "only" is yachiyd. It does ...


5

Ken Graham’s fulsome answer deals almost entirely with the ‘perpetual virginity’ of Mary but I am concerned to look at the claimed role of Mary in salvation because, whether or not Mary remained a virgin after giving birth to Jesus Christ, your question deals with a biblical doctrine – salvation – whereas there is no biblical doctrine of the perpetual ...


4

Perpetual virginity of Mary: why did Mary see “not knowing man” as an obstacle to the conception of Jesus? Mary, like Joseph, understood natural law. Specifically, one cannot have a baby if they are a virgin. It requires a partner of the opposite sex. (Joseph was going to send Mary away in Matt. 1:19 because he understood natural law.) For those who ...


4

One would think Mary knew the birds and the bees. One would think that she knew that after betrothal, a couple would cohabitate and consummate their marriage. Naturally, a baby would ensue approximately 9 months later. After all, that’s how Mary was born! Her mother and father went through the same process. One would think Mary knew that. This is a ...


4

Establishing Context What does Gabriel say? (Luke 1:31) καὶ ἰδού συλλήψῃ ἐν γαστρὶ καὶ τέξῃ υἱόν καὶ καλέσεις τὸ ὄνομα αὐτοῦ Ἰησοῦν And behold, you shall concieve in your womb and bear a son, and you shall name him Jesus. What does Mary say in response? (Luke 1:34) εἶπεν δὲ Μαριὰμ πρὸς τὸν ἄγγελον Πῶς ἔσται τοῦτο ἐπεὶ ἄνδρα οὐ γινώσκω But Mary said to the ...


4

The difference between Protestants and Catholics here all starts with the Catholic view that Mary died a virgin. But some scriptures talk of Jesus's brothers, such as Matthew 12:47 and Mark 6:3. So some Catholics say that brothers here means cousins. Protestants reply that there is a specific Greek word for cousins which would have been more appropriate ...


3

The Protoevangelium of James may crystalize and record early, and obviously accepted, beliefs about Mary. But they are not 'where we get the doctrine from'. They are not Scripture. Similar to the book of Enoch, contaning the prophesy quoted in Jude (Jude 14-15), while not being part of Scripture. The fact that it was written that early, and is trying to be ...


3

The link you quote (which I will also link to here) explains the view of Catholics on this passage in some detail. The article explains how they interpret the passage, and gives examples of other places where 'brother' does not imply coming from the same womb. If it was a normal usage of the time, then there is no reason why people of Jesus' hometown would ...


3

Below is a compelling narrative published by watchtower and available for reading at. http://www.jw.org/en/bible-teachings/questions/was-jesus-married/ Direct quote below: "Did Jesus have siblings? Yes, Jesus had at least six siblings. These included his brothers James, Joseph, Simon, and Judas as well as at least two sisters. (Matthew 13:54-56; Mark ...


3

One of the points of theology that has traditionally separated some Protestants from our Roman and Eastern brothers and sisters is the question of the perpetual virginity of the Blessed Mary. The argument is usually cast as a typical reformed – catholic debate with the issue of biblical authority vs. authority of tradition at the center of it. I however I ...


3

The Protestant view of Zechariah 12:10 : And I will pour upon the house of David, and upon the inhabitants of Jerusalem, the spirit of grace and of supplications: and they shall look upon me whom they have pierced, and they shall mourn for him, as one mourneth for his only son, and shall be in bitterness for him, as one that is in bitterness for his ...


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