16

If we accept the bible teaching that Mary/Joseph had children, then they would have been younger than Jesus. In the question, the age of Jesus was 12. The oldest sibling was probably no older than 10 at that time. Is not this the carpenter, the son of Mary, the brother of James, and Joses, and of Juda, and Simon? and are not his sisters here with us? ...


14

With parables you have to remember that they are directed at a specific audience, and make a specific point. Trying to extrapolate to draw conclusions outside the purpose of the parable would lead to a wrong conclusion. Parables are also used to illustrate general principles, not to lay down hard and fast rules. In the Parable of the Talents, the point is ...


14

There are two facets to the answer, one regarding the nature of the sin offering itself, and one regarding Mary’s motivations for making the offering. In summary, in Israel, so-called “sin” offerings were offered for transgressions agains the ritual law, not so much for offenses against the moral law. Moreover, just as Jesus submitted himself to the ...


14

In Trinitarian theology, Jesus is both God and Man, so the title "Son of Man" isn't incorrect in that regard. Throughout Matthew, Mark and Luke, Jesus generally encourages the "Messianic secret" -- He doesn't directly state He is God. Instead He does or says things which lead sincere people to that conclusion. This miracle relies on a ...


13

The verse is part of a parable that Jesus taught. The parable seems intended to teach about the judgment of God at this point. It does not suggest that human governance should even follow this example. He merely uses what could and often did happen to illustrate a point of God's supreme governance. 11 As they heard these things, he proceeded to tell a ...


13

Side note: The issue isn't really about the doctrine of sola scriptura, but rather about literalism. "Sola scriptura" is a term used by Protestants to mean that we believe scripture is the only ultimate authority, as opposed to Catholic doctrines that the teachings of the Church fathers have equivalent or comparable authority to scripture. But nothing in ...


13

Protestants typically argue that Jesus is explaining how one might be "saved by works," and not suggesting that it is actually possible for the man to accomplish it on his own – on the contrary, he implies that it is impossible. John Gill's analysis is helpful: Our Lord intimates by this, that, according to the tenor of the law, eternal life was not to ...


13

Most branches of Christianity believe that Jesus rose from the dead bodily (ie he wasn't merely a spirit at that point). The very context of the verse you are referring to, is that he was eating the fish to show he was not a ghost to his disciples: Jesus Appears to the Disciples 36 While they were still talking about this, Jesus himself stood among them and ...


12

What lies below is certainly not the only way to interpret this scripture, but it is one way I find extremely compelling, and to my knowledge, provides a reasonable historical understanding. This passage in scripture is built on a long foundation of culture and history, which is largely lost on a modern audience. First, a reminder about the immediately ...


12

If you accept its own testimony then Luke was written:- Before the Acts of the Apostles and by the same author as the writer of Acts (compare Acts 1:1 with Luke 1:1-4); The author of Acts was, at times, a companion of Paul on his missionary journeys: about 49 AD, Acts 16:10-18; about 54-57 AD, Acts 20:4-21:19; and about 59-62 AD, Acts 27:1-28:30. All ...


11

Following Christ in many countries carries a significant price to pay in many places of the world. In fact, the decision to become a Christian often results in being ostracized from one's family and even worse. Even within some Christian traditions, the decision to leave the tradition of one's family to join another tradition is met with exclusion from the ...


11

Christians do not believe that the Bible was dictated by God in the same sense that Muslims believe the Quran was dictated to Muhammed. They believe that God inspired the writers, through their own knowledge and personalities, to write the things that God wanted his people to know and remember. Because of this it is possible for an author to write inspired ...


11

Did he literally bleed through his pores as could be interpreted from this verse? Yes. This condition is called Hematidrosis. What would cause him to sweat blood during a prayer to his Father? Hematidrosis may occur when a person is suffering extreme levels of stress; for example, facing his or her own death. What is the spiritual meaning behind this ...


11

For most Protestants this is a matter of semantics. Protestants know full well that Catholics call Mary, the "Blessed Mother." They also know that if you ask a Catholic "Is Mary blessed?" They would surely answer "Yes, indeed she is." But the Catholic should understand that the Protestant, in general, would also answer the same. Mary is blessed. Mary ...


11

It simply means that Mary is blessed not only for bearing the flesh of Christ, but most of all because she heard the word of God and obeyed it. "Mary is more blessed in receiving the faith of Christ, than in conceiving the flesh of Christ. ... For his brothers, his relatives according to the flesh who did not believe in him, of what advantage is that ...


10

Translation philosophy The translator's job is to pick the best word(s) to fit their translation philosophy. This could mean the most "literal" (i.e. technically accurate, ignoring connotations) term, or it could mean trying to most accurately capture the intent of the original author, even if that means changing the words. The first option is called "...


10

We do not know exactly where heaven or hell is. However, in Scripture, the word "up" is commonly used in association with the location of heaven and "down" is typically associated with the location of hell, either figuratively or literally. Also, from the vantage point of heaven, earth is down. The "up" and "down" ...


10

Christians who believe in the inerrancy or infallibility of the Bible argue that these two accounts are not contradictory: that Jesus met his followers in both Jerusalem and Galilee after his resurrection. Such an argument first requires establishing that there was a lengthy period of time between the resurrection and the ascension, and that Luke 24 is a ...


10

We can identify several views regarding the suffering of Jesus. (1) That he did feel fear and grief, but did not sin. (2) That he did not feel fear, per se, but did feel grief. Within (2), there are differing understandings of why Jesus felt grief and agony. Those who (a) accept penal substitution will argue that he was suffering on behalf of his people, ...


10

As expected, "once saved, always saved" advocates (I'll use "reformed" as shorthand for this) generally agree that both the second and third types of soil represent people who were never saved. Broadly speaking, they make these points: The four soils represent four types of people or hearts: the unresponsive, the impulsive, the ...


10

There are two common ways to explain this: The "third year" refers to the third year of Elijah's stay in Zarephath, following a stay of some months at the brook Cherith (Adam Clarke, Barnes, Haydock, Keil and Delitzsch) The "third year" refers to the time of Elijah's exile, which did not begin until the dry period had already been ...


10

I think taken together the Gospels do make us think about this possibility. God has inspired not just the texts of each Biblical book in isolation, but in relation to each other. Lazarus himself is interesting, being mentioned only in John, despite his resurrection being one of the most stunning of all of Jesus's miracles. But to go so far as to assert that ...


10

The earliest Christians' knowledge of Lazarus came not from the Gospel accounts, but rather from personal acquaintance or acquaintance with those who knew Lazarus. In short, they knew Lazarus personally and knew he was not the person in Luke's account. That knowledge was passed down through the ages in the Church. In the Eastern Orthodox tradition, ...


10

ειπεν δε μαριαμ προς τον αγγελον πως εσται τουτο -επει- ανδρα ου γινωσκω Luke 1:34 - TR (Stephens 1550, Beza 1598, Elzevir 1624 and Scrivener 1894 are all identical.) Then said Mary unto the angel, How shall this be, seeing I know not a man? KJV The Greek conjunction ἐπεί epei (see Strong 1893) cannot be manipulated into meaning something with regard to a ...


10

According to Philippians 2 we are to have within ourselves the same mind that was in Christ Jesus. So then Jesus had, in himself, the mind that: Though he was in the form of God He did not cling onto that but instead He emptied himself by taking the form of a servant. (v. 6-7) Having been found in human form (servant) he humbled himself by obedience all the ...


9

Most adherents of sola scriptura are memorialist in their understanding of the Eucharist. This means they believe Jesus was using a metaphor (albeit one God had intentionally set up beforehand). In the same way that the Scapegoat prefigured Christ*, or the Rock that Moses beat instead of struck prefigured Christ, so too the bread in the Passover prefigured ...


9

Jesus' answer emphasizes what is more important. It is more important that a person hear the word of God and obey it than to be chosen by God for some special task. Not everyone will be chosen for a special position, but anyone can choose to obey God. Jesus puts things regarding (his own) family into perspective: they are not as important as seeking the ...


8

Attending to the interest in "what any scholar has to say" about teaching on poverty (and, necessarily I suppose, wealth -- the two themes tend to come together) in Luke... For general context, see Martin Hengel, Property and Riches in the Early Church: Aspects of a Social History of Early Christianity (Fortress, 1998). Hengel was one of the foremost ...


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