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The gospel of Jesus, written by Luke, has a specific reason for giving the genealogy that he does. Notice where Luke suddenly (almost unexpectedly) places that genealogy. He plonks it right inbetween Jesus' baptism in the Jordan river and the temptations in the wilderness (Luke 3:23-38). Why would a genealogy appear there, in the narrative? Well, consider ...


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Different genealogy in St. Matthew and St. Luke? The reason for the differences between these two genealogies are multiple. St. Matthew's genealogy is that of St. Joseph St. Luke's, that of the Blessed Virgin. The genealogy of Christ according to the First Evangelist descends from Abraham through three series of fourteen members each; the first fourteen ...


2

The Catechism reads: 599 Jesus' violent death was not the result of chance in an unfortunate coincidence of circumstances, but is part of the mystery of God's plan, as St. Peter explains to the Jews of Jerusalem in his first sermon on Pentecost: "This Jesus [was] delivered up according to the definite plan and foreknowledge of God." This Biblical ...


1

The sending of the Holy Spirit is one of the means by which Christ fulfills his promise to be with us always. The Haydock Catholic Bible Commentary enumerates additional ways in which Christ remains with us: by always dwelling in the hearts of the faithful; by his sacramental presence in the holy Eucharist; by his providential care, and constant protection ...


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Leaders must be very careful of their utterances because so many are out there waiting to twist their words in order to accuse them and bring them into offense. Like Jesus, leaders should be discretionary and watch for the motive behind every question before giving an answer.


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It is believed that Jesus, even assumed, that Jesus said this, implying he is "[Almighty] God", in turn, "The Father". However, on the other side of the spectrum, verses Revelation 1:8, 21:6 and 22:13 identifies not Jesus, but rather, The Father Himself. This is obvious when you check out the references. Alpha and omega are the first and last letters of ...


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