50

The context of Matthew is adultery--relations with a woman who is not your wife. The context of Proverbs is marriage--relations with the woman who is your wife. The difference is quite substantial. “You have heard that it was said, ‘You shall not commit adultery.’ 28 But I say to you that everyone who looks at a woman with lustful intent has already ...


29

Our command to love our enemies is intended for our human enemies, whom God also loves. God's love for us is shown through His sacrifice on the cross, and also in the statement that it is His desire that every man come to repentance. Satan, on the other hand, cannot come to repentance, and there is no hope for his redemption. A good answer with ...


28

Faulty Premise #1: John the Baptist was a reincarnation of Elijah When Jesus asked Peter who people said he was, he answered that some people thought that Jesus was Elijah come back. Peter knew better and said Jesus was the Christ. In any event, John the Baptist himself directly denied the claim (see John 1:19-21). What Jesus more likely was saying in ...


27

Jesus is the king of metaphors. This reference was not meant as an insult. To quote from Life Application Study Bible in reference to Matthew 15:24: Jesus' words do not contradict the truth that God's message is for all people. After all, when Jesus said these words, He was in Gentile territory on a mission to Gentile people. He ministered to Gentiles ...


25

Christ is using his ability to perform miracles as evidence that he is God, and therefore has the right and the ability to forgive sins. He is saying, anyone can say "Your sins are forgiven," without any evidence that they have the authority to do so. But only God can heal a paralytic. So by performing such a miracle, Christ is proving that he has the ...


23

According to this answer to a question I asked on the Biblical Hermeneutics SE, the original New Testament Greek does not have a phrase like "vain repetition"; instead, the word used, βαττολογησητε ("battologesete") simply means "to babble" or "to sound like one who is stammering". The word is onomatopoietic, and the sense seems to be "using words [not ...


22

Isaiah 35:5-6a,10 NIV: Then will the eyes of the blind be opened   and the ears of the deaf unstopped. 6Then will the lame leap like a deer,   and the mute tongue shout for joy. (verse 10 shows context of Zion) 10 and those the LORD has rescued will return. They will enter Zion with singing;   everlasting joy will crown their ...


20

To me, this is a very offensive direction that Jesus gives. And that isn't a bad thing -- frequently the Bible gives directions that are offensive to what we are accustomed to believing. We should always take them seriously. In this case, I think the message is that we must put following Christ above everything, even our most important worldly concerns. ...


20

I don't have a definitive answer, but here are a few things to keep in mind about the text. When I consider some combination of these, it doesn't bother me that an omniscient God is "surprised". The word in the text is not usually translated "surprised" as if it was an unexpected event. The sense is one of wonder or awe or marvel or (as in your translation) ...


20

There are two differences here: "from evil" (KJV) versus "from the evil one" (NIV) "for thine is the kingdom..." in the KJV but not the NIV. The first difference reflects an alternative translation choice for the Greek word "πονηροῦ". This might be in the masculine or the neuter gender - the word forms are the same. But there is a difference in meaning: if ...


19

In addition to Affable Geek's answer, I would like to add this verse clearly showing that reincarnation is incompatible with Christianity, Hebrews 9:27: ... man is destined to die once, and after that to face judgment...


18

The Greek word is πυλαι and does literally mean "gates", and this is the only reference to the gates of Hades/Hell in the NT. It's also the first use of the word εκκλησια, "the called-out", "church". The gates of a city are the point at which attackers lay siege, the weakest point. The strength of a city is directly related to the strength or power of its ...


18

The word "generation" there in Greek is γενεα (genea), which can also refer to a family, stock, nation. (Strongs, definition 2b) The NASB also has a footnote here next to "generation" saying "Or race". I've always interpreted it, therefore, as meaning that the Jewish people will continue to exist until the second coming. Another form of the same word, ...


17

In the next verse Jesus tells of how he will have to suffer, die, and rise again. Matthew 16:21 NIV 21 From that time on Jesus began to explain to his disciples that he must go to Jerusalem and suffer many things at the hands of the elders, the chief priests and the teachers of the law, and that he must be killed and on the third day be raised ...


17

There is no doubt this truly happened, but in many of the events in the gospels, they are the only records of the history which is why they written. I think when one gospel has something and the others do not, we can assume this is not to be central in our view of the ministry of Christ, but that it is important from the angle that the individual writer ...


17

It is worth pointing out that even if you take the stance that the verse is saying that Peter had some kind of special status, there is nothing that indicates that that authority is continued in his line. Every other place I can think of where a lineage related authority is granted, it is pretty clearly laid out by God in scripture. (For example the ...


17

Good question! In the New American Bible (Revised Edition), which is the translation authorized by the U.S. Council of Catholic Bishops for use in the United States, Matt. 19:9 reads: I say to you, whoever divorces his wife (unless the marriage is unlawful) and marries another commits adultery. (Note: you don't specify which translation you're using; ...


16

Jesus was attempting to hide the fact that he was the Messiah. But, it's not because he was afraid of the local authority. Rather, he was trying to delay the events of his death. He knew that the timing had to be perfect and these events recorded in Matthew were "too soon". Part 1: The secret In John 7, Jesus' disciples are going up to the festival. ...


16

It's important to understand who 'they' refer to. From verse 23 we know the Lord is talking directly to the Sadducees, which say that there is no resurrection. They were asking a question to bait/trap the Lord in contradicting Moses, the lawgiver (see Deut 25:5-10). Remember this question is about what happens in the resurrection when the Sadducees don't ...


15

You must take verses 5 and 6 together, as they're a single statement. Christ has just told the paralyzed man that his sins are forgiven, and the teachers around Him that saw it believed His statement of forgiveness was blasphemy as only God can forgive sins. They failed to recognize that Christ was God. So, He then makes a point of showing them that it's ...


15

I don't think its meant to be interpreted literally. I take it as "Do everything you possibly can to avoid sinning." relevant example: I have a co-worker of refuses to go to the beach since he would be tempted to engage in lust-related activities. Whether you agree with my coworker's interpretation and level of devotion to the literal word is not my point. ...


15

In many languages today there is the equivalent of the English word "acquire." In Russian "priobrel" means acquire - in contrast "buy" in Russian would be kupit. In Azerbaijani language for "buy" we use a word "almaq" which has many meanings like buy, take, gain. This word acquire in the original Greek does not necessarily mean that someone put down real ...


15

The books of Matthew, Mark, Luke and John can be seen to present Christ as King, Servant, Man, and God (in that order). See E.W. Bullinger's wonderful book Number in Scriptures for more on this topic (the chapter on the number seven). As Bullinger puts it, a king must have a genealogy, and a man should have one. You'll notice that Matthew's genealogy starts ...


15

There is debate on the actual meaning of verse 18, particularly what "his rock" is. Is it Peter? Or is it the Truth that Peter told in verse 16? Many Protestants believe that it is referring to the thing Peter said - that Jesus is the Messiah, the Son of the living God. Jesus will build His Church based on who He is. Barnes' Notes on the Bible ...


15

Protestants typically interpret this verse to be referring to Christ, the Chief Cornerstone, when he speaks of the rock upon which the church will be built. Greek Grammar One reason for this is that Peter as a proper name for Simon is masculine in form -- petros (Strong's G4074). When Jesus says "on this rock", the word for "rock" is feminine -- petra (...


15

It's hard to know for certain, but there are very good reasons to believe all four gospels were written in Greek. However, according to the earliest Christian tradition, Matthew was written in Hebrew. Papias, an early second century bishop and a disciple of the Apostle John, is our earliest witness to the tradition that Matthew was the author of this gospel....


14

The genealogy in the gospel of Matthew is definitely the genealogy of Joseph, and the genealogy in Luke's Gospel is most likely that of Mary. This coincides with the primary audiences of the two books (Mathew the Jews, and Luke the Gentiles). Mathew would want to show according to Jewish tradition that Jesus was both a Jew and a Son of David. Luke was trying ...


Only top voted, non community-wiki answers of a minimum length are eligible