17

St Thomas Aquinas asks in Summa Theologica 3.1.3, "If man had not sinned, would God nevertheless have become incarnate?" (Latin: Si homo non peccasset, nihilominus Deus incarnatum fuisset?). His answer is "no", while acknowledging that God could have still chosen to become incarnate for other reasons; although he recognizes a diversity of thought on the ...


13

The problem that you run into is John 1 - in which it says of Jesus, that by him all things were made, and there is nothing that was made that He didn't make. This is why the Nicene Creed is so careful to say he was begotten not made. If God the Father made Jesus, then John made a boo-boo. The incarnation, on the other hand, is merely putting flesh to that ...


11

The Angelus is composed of three versicle-response prayers, alternating with Hail Marys. The phrase in question is from the beginning. In Latin: V: Angelus Domini nuntiavit Mariae. R: Et concepit de Spiritu Sancto. I learned this in English as V: The angel of the Lord declared unto Mary. R: And she conceived of the Holy Ghost. If I were ...


9

Signs in tradition and scripture, can have two basic senses. In the first sense, they are often miraculous indicators of the speaker's trustworthiness, which encourage the listener to believe. In the second sense, they embody or represent a larger or more transcendent truth. The general formula for signs in my first sense is that the speaker first delivers a ...


9

Was there a reason Jesus came at the time he did? The short answer is "yes" – there is nothing accidental about how the key events in the Bible timeline unfold. This is evident in Acts 41 for example: 27for truly in this city there were gathered together against your holy servant Jesus, whom you anointed, both Herod and Pontius Pilate, along with the ...


9

The Catholic Church certainly teaches that Christ is the actual physical offspring of Mary; that is, that he is genetically descended from Mary: The Holy Spirit, “the Lord, the giver of Life,” is sent to sanctify the womb of the Virgin Mary and divinely fecundate it, causing her to conceive the eternal Son of the Father in a humanity drawn from her own. (...


8

I suspect it should read a 'duad of sons', not a 'daud of sons'. A duad is something made two parts. Compare it with triad or monad. The Nestorian position is sometimes described as teaching that Christ is a duad, composed of a divine person and a human person. According to this, Jesus was not a single person who was fully man and fully God. Instead, the ...


7

Human nature entails a human soul. When Christ became man, every aspect of His human nature was created: It is to be remembered that, when the Word took Flesh, there was no change in the Word; all the change was in the Flesh. At the moment of conception, in the womb of the Blessed Mother, through the forcefulness of God's activity, not only was the ...


6

Part of the reason seems to have been wanting to minimize the drive to direct the Messiah toward worldly goals. Many people wanted a worldly king, e.g., John 6:15 (NIV): Jesus, knowing that they intended to come and make him king by force, withdrew again into the hills by himself. and there was a desire for "bread and circuses" (well full stomachs and ...


6

In historical Christian belief (of almost any type), it would be considered heresy to say that God the Son was created. You can use a neat term here "nicene christianity". Regarding your question - Christ has a complete human nature (human body and human soul) and this nature is created. Christ has accepted our nature with all sinless weaknesses of this ...


6

Once - in two different ways depending on our definition of 'begotten' There seems to be some confusion on the subject because "only begotten" a theological term does not mean "begotten" a biblical term. But to answer your question, if thinking 'begotten' as in 'only begotten' it gains prominence in Council of Nicaea in A.D. 325 representing Christ’s ...


6

My first posting as an answer. (Pardon my english mistakes if any) The short answer is obviously 3 (except the Mary's part). Let's think about the Wine Miracle where water turns into wine to get some idea of characteristics of an miracle. The wine is obviously really wine although we don't know whether it is zinfandel or cabernet souvignon nor the age of ...


6

In the Old Testament God does take physical forms however the incarnation of the Messiah is unique. Hypostatic union means human and divine natures united in one person. It would be misleading to say the OT appearances of God as an angel, man or tree are hypostatic union. Some helpful references from the tanakh - The Hebrew Bible Teaches Complex Monotheism ...


6

Trinitarians believe in the "unipersonality" of Jesus – that is, that he is one person and does not have multiple "personalities" that could interact with each other. The most important trinitarian creedal statement on the incarnation of Jesus is the Chalcedonian Definition, which reads in part: [Christ is] acknowledged in Two Natures unconfusedly, ...


5

I think this answer is needed to avoid confusions. The short answer to the title is “yes”: Christ’s human nature is created. (Indeed, it could not be otherwise: the only nature that could possibly be uncreated is the Divine Nature.) As far as what was created: everything that pertains to that human nature; that is, body, soul, intellect, will, and human ...


5

For a God who always seeks to woo and not to overwhelm, this is exactly what you would expect. God could, if he chose, bring more power to bear than any of us could handle. He could force himself into everything, if that were His nature. But, as a person (not a force) who seeks to love and be loved for who He is, this makes perfect sense. As King Henry ...


5

Galatians 3 and 4 explains how God sought to lay a foundation for the coming of the Messiah, through the Jewish Law. The Law was to make people understand the depth of their sinfulness (in that they were incapable of keeping the Law) so that they might more readily accept the cure for that sin through Jesus the Messiah (Galatians 3:22-23; Romans 3:19-20). ...


5

Aquinas addresses the question from different angles a number of places in the Summa Theologica, in various parts of the "Treatise on the Most Holy Trinity" (First Part, Questions 27–43). The fundamental question is answered more or less directly in Question 27, "The Procession of the Divine Persons". Article 2 of this question, "Whether any ...


5

St. Thomas Aquinas addresses your questions in his Summa Theologica I q. 42 ("Of Equality and Likeness among the Divine Persons"). Specifically, regarding your first question, see ibid. a. 6 obj. 2:Objection 2: Further, greater is the power of him who commands and teaches than of him who obeys and hears. But the Father commands the Son according to Jn. 14:...


5

Ah, the extra calvinisticum as it was derisively called by the Lutheran Reformers. The Reformed position is that although the Word is fully united to the human nature it could not completely contained by it. The Belgic Confession discusses the two natures: We believe that by being thus conceived the person of the Son has been inseparably united and ...


5

Since he is God since all times, did he become true human in the incarnation or he was already man before it? No, He did not always have a human nature. As St. John writes in the Gospel: John 1:1,14 (DRB) ...the Word was God. ... And the Word was made flesh and dwelt among us. St. Paul writes to the church at Philippi concerning the humility of ...


5

Philippians 2:2-8 (DRB) Fulfil ye my joy, that you may be of one mind, having the same charity, being of one accord, agreeing in sentiment. 3 Let nothing be done through contention, neither by vain glory: but in humility, let each esteem others better than themselves: 4 Each one not considering the things that are his own, but those that are other men's....


4

Just a Christmas treat for those who enjoy this sort of thing. Of course finding the infant, as lead by the star shining over the animal house, wrapped up and placed in a feeding-trough (φάτνη) is a striking thing to see. The contrast of this earthly, helpless child to the heralding angelic glory announcing his birth is breathtaking to say the least. But ...


4

Perhaps the strongest case for the deity of Messiah is from the gospels, John 20, where Thomas sees the risen Messiah, touches the nail prints in his hands, and finally believes, exclaiming to Messiah, My Lord, and my God! Messiah's response to Thomas is telling; he affirms by saying, You believe only because you've seen. Blessed are those that ...


4

Philippians 2:5-7 New International Version (NIV) 5 In your relationships with one another, have the same mindset as Christ Jesus: 6 Who, being in very nature God, did not consider equality with God something to be used to his own advantage; 7 rather, he made himself nothing by taking the very nature of a servant, being ...


4

We do not know. We only know that He came at the appropriate time. Galatians 4:4-5: 4 But when the fullness of time had come, God sent his Son, born of a woman, born under the law, 5 to ransom those under the law, so that we might receive adoption. From this we know the well-known facts that at the time of His coming: His mother, Mary, born of Saint ...


4

As is so often the case with questions such as yours, it's not a matter of "either/or" but "both/and." Let's put it this way: the comparison between the church universal ("the holy catholic Church"--the Apostles' Creed) and a body is both an analogy and a metaphor. The expression of the church as a body is presented perhaps no more clearly than in 1 ...


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