17

St Thomas Aquinas asks in Summa Theologica 3.1.3, "If man had not sinned, would God nevertheless have become incarnate?" (Latin: Si homo non peccasset, nihilominus Deus incarnatum fuisset?). His answer is "no", while acknowledging that God could have still chosen to become incarnate for other reasons; although he recognizes a diversity of ...


11

The Angelus is composed of three versicle-response prayers, alternating with Hail Marys. The phrase in question is from the beginning. In Latin: V: Angelus Domini nuntiavit Mariae. R: Et concepit de Spiritu Sancto. I learned this in English as V: The angel of the Lord declared unto Mary. R: And she conceived of the Holy Ghost. If I were ...


10

Hosea 11:9 says "I am God and not a man." But it says neither "I am God and cannot become a man" nor "I am God and cannot be a man", which the OP has put in the title of the question.


9

Was there a reason Jesus came at the time he did? The short answer is "yes" – there is nothing accidental about how the key events in the Bible timeline unfold. This is evident in Acts 41 for example: 27for truly in this city there were gathered together against your holy servant Jesus, whom you anointed, both Herod and Pontius Pilate, along with ...


9

The Catholic Church certainly teaches that Christ is the actual physical offspring of Mary; that is, that he is genetically descended from Mary: The Holy Spirit, “the Lord, the giver of Life,” is sent to sanctify the womb of the Virgin Mary and divinely fecundate it, causing her to conceive the eternal Son of the Father in a humanity drawn from her own. (...


9

Since God created only the man and the woman, not animals, in His image, you are correct in saying that for God to become an animal would be against His nature. That is not to say that God never used animals to accomplish his will. The classic illustration is found in Numbers, Chapter 22. God was angry with the prophet Balaam, and the angel of the LORD (a ...


8

I suspect it should read a 'duad of sons', not a 'daud of sons'. A duad is something made two parts. Compare it with triad or monad. The Nestorian position is sometimes described as teaching that Christ is a duad, composed of a divine person and a human person. According to this, Jesus was not a single person who was fully man and fully God. Instead, the ...


7

Human nature entails a human soul. When Christ became man, every aspect of His human nature was created: It is to be remembered that, when the Word took Flesh, there was no change in the Word; all the change was in the Flesh. At the moment of conception, in the womb of the Blessed Mother, through the forcefulness of God's activity, not only was the ...


7

There are two or three passages in the Old Testament which declare something similar (Numbers 23:19 and 1 Samuel 15:29). In each case God is distinguishing himself against sinful humanity. The point is that it is his actions which are different from a man's. At the same time, Jesus himself said "God is Spirit" (John 4:24). The Bible consistently ...


6

My first posting as an answer. (Pardon my english mistakes if any) The short answer is obviously 3 (except the Mary's part). Let's think about the Wine Miracle where water turns into wine to get some idea of characteristics of an miracle. The wine is obviously really wine although we don't know whether it is zinfandel or cabernet souvignon nor the age of ...


6

In the Old Testament God does take physical forms however the incarnation of the Messiah is unique. Hypostatic union means human and divine natures united in one person. It would be misleading to say the OT appearances of God as an angel, man or tree are hypostatic union. Some helpful references from the tanakh - The Hebrew Bible Teaches Complex Monotheism ...


6

Trinitarians believe in the "unipersonality" of Jesus – that is, that he is one person and does not have multiple "personalities" that could interact with each other. The most important trinitarian creedal statement on the incarnation of Jesus is the Chalcedonian Definition, which reads in part: [Christ is] acknowledged in Two Natures unconfusedly, ...


6

Iglesia ni Cristo (Church of Christ) has ~2.3 million adherents and is the 3rd largest religious group in the Philippines. "But we do not subscribe to the belief that Christ is a God-Man or both God and man. He is man in nature according to His own testimony (John 8:40) and the teachings of His Apostles (I Tim. 2:5; Matt. 1:18)." The Lord Jesus ...


5

I think this answer is needed to avoid confusions. The short answer to the title is “yes”: Christ’s human nature is created. (Indeed, it could not be otherwise: the only nature that could possibly be uncreated is the Divine Nature.) As far as what was created: everything that pertains to that human nature; that is, body, soul, intellect, will, and human ...


5

Aquinas addresses the question from different angles a number of places in the Summa Theologica, in various parts of the "Treatise on the Most Holy Trinity" (First Part, Questions 27–43). The fundamental question is answered more or less directly in Question 27, "The Procession of the Divine Persons". Article 2 of this question, "...


5

St. Thomas Aquinas addresses your questions in his Summa Theologica I q. 42 ("Of Equality and Likeness among the Divine Persons"). Specifically, regarding your first question, see ibid. a. 6 obj. 2:Objection 2: Further, greater is the power of him who commands and teaches than of him who obeys and hears. But the Father commands the Son according to Jn. 14:...


5

Ah, the extra calvinisticum as it was derisively called by the Lutheran Reformers. The Reformed position is that although the Word is fully united to the human nature it could not completely contained by it. The Belgic Confession discusses the two natures: We believe that by being thus conceived the person of the Son has been inseparably united and ...


5

Since he is God since all times, did he become true human in the incarnation or he was already man before it? No, He did not always have a human nature. As St. John writes in the Gospel: John 1:1,14 (DRB) ...the Word was God. ... And the Word was made flesh and dwelt among us. St. Paul writes to the church at Philippi concerning the humility of the Son of ...


4

Perhaps the strongest case for the deity of Messiah is from the gospels, John 20, where Thomas sees the risen Messiah, touches the nail prints in his hands, and finally believes, exclaiming to Messiah, My Lord, and my God! Messiah's response to Thomas is telling; he affirms by saying, You believe only because you've seen. Blessed are those that ...


4

As is so often the case with questions such as yours, it's not a matter of "either/or" but "both/and." Let's put it this way: the comparison between the church universal ("the holy catholic Church"--the Apostles' Creed) and a body is both an analogy and a metaphor. The expression of the church as a body is presented perhaps no ...


4

Great question. It's a little of both. (We'd have to define what time means for God.) But I suppose we could infer Origen believed Christ's soul - as he believed of all souls - is eternal. According to his writings, all souls were created by God at some time prior to conception. Let us inquire whether God, the creator and founder of all things, created ...


4

"How is Jesus the Messiah, the seed of David"? Simple: Jesus is the human aspect of the offspring of David. Before that, Jesus was spirit. Jesus created all things, including humanity, as one of the persons of the Godhead before He was flesh and blood. It was only after Mary gave birth to Him that Jesus became flesh and blood. So this is not a circle. To ...


4

St. Thomas Aquinas addresses this question in Summa Theologica III q. 3 a. 8 ("Whether it was more fitting that the Person of the Son rather than any other Divine Person should assume human nature?") c.: It was most fitting that the Person of the Son should become incarnate. First, on the part of the union; for such as are similar are fittingly ...


4

Thomas Aquinas deals with this question in Third Part, Question 3, Article 4: "Can one Person assume without another?" He argues that the assumption of a human nature implies two things in Article 2: in the word assumption two things are signified--to wit, the principle and the term of the action. Now to be the principle of the assumption belongs to the ...


4

It's a big, transcendent deal for Latter-Day Saints too, just in a different way. Mormons believe that God the Son, Jesus Christ, has a physical body, but before the Incarnation he didn't. As I understand it, the Catholic doctrine of "hypostatic union" teaches that Christ was both fully human and fully divine during his mortal ministry. LDS doctrine ...


4

Perhaps another way to look at this issue is to focus on what human nature is, and see what sin changed. Man was created in the "image of God," which certainly included original righteousness (or, as Reformed theologian Louis Berkhof puts it, "true knowledge, righteousness, and holiness"), which was lost in the Fall. Berkhof goes on to contrast this ...


4

The idea of permanent incarnation has been most famously expressed in the Council of Chalcedon, long before the Reformation – there Christ's natures are said to exist "indivisibly, inseperably." Reformers like Luther and Calvin upheld the Chalcedonian definition, and this can be seen in their writings. For example, here's a brief quote from Calvin:...


4

Philippians 2:2-8 (DRB) Fulfil ye my joy, that you may be of one mind, having the same charity, being of one accord, agreeing in sentiment. 3 Let nothing be done through contention, neither by vain glory: but in humility, let each esteem others better than themselves: 4 Each one not considering the things that are his own, but those that are other men's. 5 ...


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