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13

Luther clearly thought all relics were ridiculous nonsense and evidences of a very degraded sense of spiriituality.  “It is claimed that the head of St. John the Baptist is in Rome, although all histories show that the Saracens opened John’s grave and burned everything to powder. Yet the pope is not ashamed of his lies. So with reference to other relics ...


12

Did they ever have power? Relics, like people, do not have power. The power comes from God. If you have faith that God can heal, He will reward your faith. And the Lord said unto Moses, Make thee a fiery serpent, and set it upon a pole: and it shall come to pass, that every one that is bitten, when he looketh upon it, shall live. And Moses made a ...


11

Though it's difficult to speak for Protestants as a whole, my experience with them is that they place no significance on incorruptibility, and as a rule, they are suspect of relics possessing special properties. Nobody will deny evidence that an undecomposed dead body is in an unusual state, but I doubt that many of them will claim that such a state is ...


10

Much Silence As it applies to your question, there are two basic flavors of Protestantism. One kind consists of groups that have some form of centralized organization who could at least be said to have an “official” stance on a given position. The other kind has no formal centralization (they believe each congregation—and individual—to be autonomous in ...


7

As another answer has implied, Protestants receive their doctrines via the principle of sola scriptura, that is, they do not rely on the traditions of men to inform what constitutes valid religious practice, but rely on the teaching of scripture made plain by the assistance of the Holy Spirit. The scriptures do actually teach us about "incorruptibility", ...


7

Fr. Ronald Knox (a good guy to read if you're a fan of Chesterton) wrote: In a word, we are treating material objects and vocal formulas as the occasions upon which God himself will see fit to bestow a blessing upon us, in answer to the prayers offered when the object was hallowed, or the formula instituted. An exception must, of course, be made in favour ...


6

St. Maximillan Kolbe would be a good example of a saint whom we will never be able to identify any of his first degree relics, since he was burned in a Nazi concentration camp during world war II. However, there are many 2nd and 3rd degree relics. Relics are the remains of a saint. They are classified according to degrees. First degree relics are ...


5

The bones of Elisha raised a dead man The earliest reference to a divine miracle happening through the remains of a holy person is in the Old Testament when a dead man came into contact with the bones of Elisha the prophet and the man was resurrected. Elisha died and was buried. Now Moabite raiders used to enter the country every spring. Once while some ...


5

The short answer is no. Not every saint is expected to have an incorruptible corpse. Although incorruptibility is recognized as supernatural, it is no longer counted as a miracle in the recognition of a saint (The Incorruptibles). Embalmed bodies were not recognized as incorruptibles. For example, although the body of Pope John XXIII remained in a ...


5

Vid means widow. Reference. The date 1949 is probably when the relic was last verified and sealed. St Margaret may well be St Margaret of Scotland. But there are a number of other candidates — Wikipedia lists the following, and there may well be more: Saint Margaret the Virgin of Antioch (died 304) [unlikely, since widow is stated!] Saint Margaret of ...


4

First class relics are the physical remains of a saint (a bone, a hair, skull, a limb, etc.) Treatment of relics: The sale of relics is strictly forbidden by the Church. The Code of Canon Law states: §1190 §1 – "It is absolutely forbidden to sell sacred relics." Apostolic See decides what is to be done with the relics. §1190 §2 – "Relics of great ...


4

The veneration and collection of relics is a ritual which started in the Middle Ages, following many pilgrimages to the Holy Land following the Crusades. The first relics which were collected were those the Virgin Mary together with those of St. Joseph and Jesus Christ himself. Particularly, relics were collected from the remains of the Holy Cross, which was ...


4

What is the basis of belief in incorruptibility of saints in Eastern Orthodoxy anyway? I would presume its based on an interpretation Psalm 16:10 "For thou wilt not leave my soul in hell; neither wilt thou suffer thine Holy One to see corruption." But while Eastern Orthodox and Catholics may put an interpretation on this that suits their particular ...


4

The Armenian Orthodox Cathedral in Etchmiadzin, Armenia claims to be in possession of a relic of a piece of wood that was part of the ark made by Noah, however it is mostly based on legend. There are many legends that the mountains could tell about the time when Noah and his family descended from the Ark into the valley. One day the Christians of the area ...


4

Do we know the fates of any of the implausible relics Martin Luther described? The answer to this question will depend on the relic! St Michael's Feather When I was a young altar server, the standard joke was that if you were good you would be able to find a "feather of St. Michael." We all understood this as a joke because Angels are intellectual in ...


4

The inscription on the cross is common of a Saint Benedict Medal Eius in obitu nostro praesentia muniamur May we be strengthened by his presence in the hour of our death St. Benedict Medal (Wikipedia) And the person in Biblical Dress is probably St. Benedict of Nursia, the founder of the Benedictine Order, an ancient order of religious brothers ...


3

Idolatry Idolatry is, as the name suggests, that which concerns the worship of idols. Since they (idols) are not God, idolatry is the worship of whatever is not God. That is, anything that is not God; a creature of God. What is the difference between icons and idols in churches that permit icons? The difference is in the fact that an idol is anything ...


3

Council of Trent and rubrics A word search of the English version of the Proceedings of the Council of Trent did not, when the term relic shows up, address that detail. There may have been other supplemental guidance offered under various papal bulls or decrees, but in the Council of Trent's issued declarations that detail is not found. The prose ...


3

It's not the power of the relics that has changed, but peoples belief in miracles. With the rise of science since the renaissance, people are less inclined to believe claims of miracles without proof.


3

A lot of the evidence is circumstantial, so it's probably a matter of opinion whether it's convincing or not: The bones that are thought to be St. Peter's were found near a grave under the current high alter of the Basilica - a location that's long been considered St. Peter's grave. There are written records that indicate that ~160 AD there was a shrine ...


2

Protestants hold to the new Spiritual birth spoken of by Jesus Christ to Nicodemus: John 3:5 Jesus answered, Verily, verily, I say unto thee, Except a man be born of water and of the Spirit, he cannot enter into the kingdom of God. Protestants trust that salvation is by God’s grace through faith alone not of works. Protestants believe their life works ...


2

I sent an e-mail to Father Carlos Martins, the primary contact of Treasures of the Church (a relic exhibition that travels across North America). Part of their relic collection includes a hair of St. Maximilian Kolbe, who was martyred in a Nazi death camp and had his body cremated. When I asked how the relic was obtained, given that his body was burned, I ...


2

You answered this question yourself in your other answer. Relics are the remains of a saint. They are classified according to degrees. First degree relics are physical remains of a saint. They are most typically bones. Second degree relics are objects or items that touched a saint while he was alive. The relics of Christ's Passion would be second degree ...


2

Neither Britannica nor Wikipedia list any form of relics within Judaism. Collecting relics was effectively never done by the Israelites or Jews. To them, only God (and God through his agents) has supernatural power. Believing that relics or other objects have supernatural power, in principle, violates the first and second commandments, "Thou shalt have no ...


2

It is definitely a what most Catholics familiar with sacramentals call a St. Benedict’s Cross. In reality it should be called a St. Benedict Crucifix. Sounds like you found a Catholic sacramental and not a relic at all! The three holes in the cross were there to hold the corpus attached the cross. The corpus being the body of Jesus on the Cross. The ...


1

Was the Gathering Relics of Holy Men in 1st Century common in the Early Church? The idea of showing respect to the dead the dead is evident in the Scriptures. In antiquity, we see the Jews taking the body of Joseph out of the Land of Egypt, when they left their oppressors. Moses took the bones of Joseph with him because Joseph had made the Israelites ...


1

The idea of bones (relics) having some supernatural power probably sources to the story of the dead man touching the bones of Elisha and returning to life. And it came to pass, as they were burying a man, that, behold, they spied a band of men; and they cast the man into the sepulchre of Elisha: and when the man was let down, and touched the bones of ...


1

How can a relic help a sick person? From the tone of body of your question, I am presuming that you would like a Catholic response. That is the perspective I am going to give for you. Holy Cards touched to the relics of the saint are third class relics. The Catholic church divides relics into three classes: First-Class Relics: items directly ...


1

In Catholicism, is an object a third-class relic if touched by a saint when they were alive? The short answer is: No. First of all let us see what relics are in the Catholic Church. Classification and prohibitions in the Catholic Church In Catholic theology, sacred relics must not be worshipped, because only God is worshipped and adored. Instead, ...


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