31

Yes, Catholics do believe that the bread and wine are transformed into the body and blood. Sort of. The "sort of" is because the technicalities of it go back to Aristotelian philosophy, which greatly influenced Thomas Aquinas, who is still in many ways the preeminent theologian of the Catholic Church. Before we get to Aquinas, though, let's look at the ...


26

Your girlfriend sounds correct. It may sound silly at first, but the doctrine of Transubstantiation is a well developed, detailed explanation of what happens during the consecration of the bread and wine. It is not a minor thing. The Catholic doctrine of Transubstantiation teaches that the substance of the bread, what the bread really is, becomes the Body ...


20

Prolegomenon There is an assumption that needs to be addressed before an answer can be given, namely that 'scripture' is the basis for practices and beliefs in the Eastern Orthodox Church. It is not. Scripture is a part of Holy Tradition (the preeminent portion indeed), but not everything comes from this. Most important is maintaining and passing on the ...


18

You are correct that most Protestants do not see the bread and wine as anything more than symbols. There is no blessing that is ever attempted to transform the elements into the literal body and blood of Christ. Consequently, the bread and wine (or juice) that could be stored for long periods of time prior to the observance of the Eucharist (the Lord's ...


18

No. Canon 844 says: Catholic ministers administer the sacraments licitly to Catholic members of the Christian faithful alone, who likewise receive them licitly from Catholic ministers alone. So Catholics may receive sacraments licitly from Catholic ministers alone. There are exceptions. In the case of Communion Whenever necessity requires it or ...


17

On the Meaning of Transubstantial To me, the prefix "trans" is the key. Transformation is change of form Transmutation is change of shape Transfiguration is change of appearance Transubstantiation is the change of substance. While often one will be related to another, it does not follow that there is a co-dependence. So, while it is possible that ...


16

It appears that the simple answer is that because the Salvation Army does not view baptism or communion as requirements of salvation, they are not practiced at all. This stance, however does not constitute disapproval of sacraments: The Salvation Army has never said it is wrong to use sacraments, nor does it deny that other Christians receive grace from ...


15

The United Methodist Church is a denomination that uses grape juice instead of wine. I am using them as an example because their reason is explicitly stated in the Book of Worship: Although the historic and ecumenical Christian practice has been to use wine, the use of unfermented grape juice by The United Methodist Church and its predecessors since the ...


15

An accidental spill of the Precious Blood can be cleaned up by soaking it up by placing a "purificator" which is a linen specially reserved to come into contact with the consecrated wine (one can use multiple of this linens depending the quantity of liquid) and then soaking them back in water do dissolve or dilute the Precious Blood. Then it can be poured ...


15

The earliest indication may be in the Didache, typically dated at the end of the first century. It describes the celebration of the Lord's Supper in terms of the cup and breaking bread, and then says: But every Lord's day gather yourselves together, and break bread, and give thanksgiving after having confessed your transgressions, that your sacrifice may ...


14

According to Catholic teachings on this topic? Generally no (as others have referenced). Would a particular priest be stupid and allow it? Maybe - some didn't have the best priestly formation. Would it be good for you spiritually? No. The most compassionate explanation I've heard is this: When you go up to receive communion the priest says "Body of ...


14

The LDS church proscribes wine (or any alcoholic beverage, really), so water is used instead, although it doesn't matter what is used for the symbols of the sacrament, according to Doctrine and Covenants in the LDS canon: D&C 27:2 2 For, behold, I say unto you, that it mattereth not what ye shall eat or what ye shall drink when ye partake of the ...


13

Symbolic meaning of the bread and wine JW's do not accept transubstantiation (the unyeasted bread means/symbolizes Jesus' perfect and sinless body and the wine represents his blood he sacrificed to save humankind from the sinful state inherited by Adam and to seal the second covenant). The biblical verses in the New World Translation (NWT), the ...


13

Side note: The issue isn't really about the doctrine of sola scriptura, but rather about literalism. "Sola scriptura" is a term used by Protestants to mean that we believe scripture is the only ultimate authority, as opposed to Catholic doctrines that the teachings of the Church fathers have equivalent or comparable authority to scripture. But nothing in ...


13

Why are we "eating" the flesh and blood of Christ? 1. Because Jesus commanded us to In the institution of the Eucharist, Jesus explicitly commands us to eat the bread and drink the wine, saying "This do in remembrance of me." Indeed, as often as we do this, we do "proclaim the Lord's death until He come." Indeed, John goes even further, recording Jesus in ...


13

This practice is attested as early as the first half of the third century, by Tertullian and particularly Hippolytus. Tertullian addresses the topic tangentially while addressing the dangers of women marrying non-Christians. Their husbands will notice their Christian practices, such as fasting before taking communion, and may put pressure on them to stop: ...


12

The reason for the different traditions of frequency of communion is that there are a wide variety of views within Christianity about what communion actually is. It is so widely disagreed over that Christians often can't agree over what name to call it. The different theologies give rise to different practices of communion, including different frequencies. ...


12

John's Gospel does not contain many of the things recorded in the Synoptics, including the Sermon on the Mount, the Transfiguration, the virgin birth, the Great Commission, and the Ascension. In fact, the only miracle outside of the Resurrection that appears in both the Synoptic gospels and John's gospel is the feeding of the 5,000. This doesn't mean that ...


12

There's an article here that covers the history of intinction quite extensively. (I apologize that it's a PDF reference. It's the best article I could find.) The article starts out like this: The common wisdom among opponents of intinction is that it arose after the doctrine of transubstantiation, and was a method of preventing Christ's blood from ...


12

The meaning of the fraction of bread is, that Christ is 'distributing himself' to the Faithful. As the prayer in Liturgy of St. John Chrysostom states The Lamb of God is broken and distributed; broken but not divided. He is forever eaten yet is never consumed, but He sanctifies those who partake of Him. Also, dropping the part of the Host into the ...


11

There's no difference between the two in respect of Eucharistic transubstantiation; hence answering "the spiritual", "the natural", or "both" are equally meaningless. My answer to a question on the Catholic understanding of the nature of transubstantiation is supposed to make it clear that what is changed in transubstantiation is the substance of the bread; ...


11

To complement Belinda’s answer, although the Church does not descend in so much detail, St. Thomas Aquinas in his Summa theologiae makes the following commentary in III Pars, q. 77, a. 4, responsum. But if the change be so great that the substance of the bread or wine would have been corrupted, then Christ's body and blood do not remain under this ...


10

Prior to the advent of pasteurization, fermentation was something which happened in all grape juice whether a fermenting agent was consciously introduced or not (and it happened with relative immediacy). The last supper, then, would have had wine and not plain grape juice. It is also noteworthy to point out that wine, unless something bizarre has occurred, ...


10

Communion under Both Kinds article at Catholic Encyclopedia has answer to both of your questions Does anyone know when this practice first became accepted? During early times public Communion in the churches was received under both kinds. But side by side with the regular liturgical usage of Communion, there existed from the earliest times the custom of ...


10

There are several churches which use the idea of transubstantiation; but the Eastern churches (Eastern Orthodox, Oriental Orthodox, and Assyrian Church of the East) share a similar view on how it works. I'll therefore split my discussion into two parts, the "Eastern" and "Western" views. Eastern View The Eastern churches have occasionally used the term "...


9

The answer is basically “no,” there is no Protestant denomination whose members would be admitted to Communion. The Church admits to Communion Catholics (evidently) and all those Christians who belong to a fully apostolic Church: that is, to a Church that has maintained apostolic succession and has the Catholic Faith regarding the Eucharist. This includes ...


9

Yes, this is the teaching of the Catholic Church. The Catechism of the Catholic Church states: 1366 The Eucharist is thus a sacrifice because it re-presents (makes present) the sacrifice of the cross, because it is its memorial and because it applies its fruit: [Christ], our Lord and God, was once and for all to offer himself to God the Father by ...


9

I am aware of one protestant view that has not been brought up, so here it is for your consideration: To interpret John 6:53 we examine the context, close to the beginning of the conversation, at John 6:35. "He that cometh to me shall never hunger; and he that believeth on me shall never thirst." In this verse Jesus sets up the interpretation for the "...


9

Most adherents of sola scriptura are memorialist in their understanding of the Eucharist. This means they believe Jesus was using a metaphor (albeit one God had intentionally set up beforehand). In the same way that the Scapegoat prefigured Christ*, or the Rock that Moses beat instead of struck prefigured Christ, so too the bread in the Passover prefigured ...


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