18

Yes it was a miracle. It is clearly stated that God did this for Israel. There is no need to fall back on "illusion" if this is marked as a miracle. When a miracle happens, "natural laws" might as well no longer apply, because God applies. That is part of what "miracle" means. You've made a number of assumptions that I think are unwarranted. The passage ...


13

The Bible itself seems to indicate that Jesus performed no miracles until His ministry began. Non-biblical sources may disagree, but they are non-biblical. John 2 records to miracle at the wedding in Cana, where Jesus turns water into wine. John completes the account with the following statement: This, the first of his signs, Jesus did at Cana in ...


12

Did they ever have power? Relics, like people, do not have power. The power comes from God. If you have faith that God can heal, He will reward your faith. And the Lord said unto Moses, Make thee a fiery serpent, and set it upon a pole: and it shall come to pass, that every one that is bitten, when he looketh upon it, shall live. And Moses made a ...


11

There are two major views on this, with several subsets. Some (including myself) believe that while miracles do still occur, the kind and frequency is different than we see at the beginning of the church era because the purpose is different; directly binding the occurrences of miracles to the creator. This is generally known as Cessationism, but there are ...


11

There is no record of Jesus performing miracles when he was a child that is accepted according to the Bible. There are also these biblical reasons to believe that he did not perform any such miracles: The Bible records no such miracles, and the most remarkable event that the Bible does record is the Finding in the Temple. See Luke 2:46-47: 46 After three ...


11

It is always better to admit you don't know than to make something up, especially when it comes to speaking about God! The idea that God fills in the gaps of our knowledge with his miracle super powers is called the 'God of the Gaps.' It has the problem of making God look like he decreases while our knowledge increases. It also does not adequately account ...


10

DISCLAIMER: I do not agree with this justification, I am merely answering your question. The justification for relying on faith healing over conventional medicine comes from a belief that turning to man is diametrically opposed to turning to God. In other words, you can either turn to God for help, or you can turn to man for help - but not both. One ...


10

Two salient facts should inform the reasoning: At the Mount of Transfiguration, Jesus was shown to be in league with the Law (Moses) and the Prophets (Elijah). Elisha had asked to receive a "double share" of Elijah's gifts - and that was granted. Elisha performed many of the same miracles that had accompanied Elijah's ministry. Jesus, then, was shown to ...


9

In the case of the devils wanting to have permission to enter the pigs rather than be cast into no particular place it seems to be under a simple desire of destruction. The demons are enraged to destroy and in this story we clearly see the bounds of the destruction they seek are under the power of God. They are tied to a divine leash, not being permitted to ...


9

The Bible gives several ways. One of the easiest is if their predictions don't come true: When a prophet speaketh in the name of the LORD, if the thing follow not, nor come to pass, that is the thing which the LORD hath not spoken, but the prophet hath spoken it presumptuously: thou shalt not be afraid of him (Deuteronomy 18:22). Another is if ...


9

A cessationist belief is best understood by finding out why miracles and wonders were performed: We must pay the most careful attention, therefore, to what we have heard, so that we do not drift away. For since the message spoken through angels was binding, and every violation and disobedience received its just punishment, how shall we escape if we ignore ...


9

Catholics love Mary, as you may know. And this particular detail of the Wedding of Cana reaffirms the Catholic devotion to Mary as an intercessor. The Gospel reveals to us how Mary prays and intercedes in faith. At Cana, the mother of Jesus asks her son for the needs of a wedding feast; this is the sign of another feast—that of the wedding of the ...


9

Eusebius in the third century wrote against Celsus's second century attack on Christianity (which only survives today in quotations from Eusebius). Celsus claims Jesus performed miracles by sorcery. He seems to accept that Jesus did perform miracles, he just disputes the source of Jesus' power. The Talmud also calls Him a sorcerer: "The master said: Jesus ...


9

There is no official Vatican online reference to this alleged miracle, so I did some basic research. The first thing I noticed is that the details of the 1996 miracle vary according to the source of the story, with at least three variants as to where the host was found. This is typical of urban myths, but by itself that is not enough to disprove the story....


9

None of the four Gospels record Jesus performing a miracle prior to his temptation in the wilderness. Matthew, Mark, and Luke all record Jesus' baptism and immediately follow it with his temptation in the wilderness. John does not mention the temptation: after Jesus's baptism, he begins calling his disciples and then performs "the first of his signs" – the ...


8

Mary Makes No Request It is important to note that Mary never specifically asks Jesus to make wine, but simply states the situation. It is possible she understood that Jesus had the power to do something, because she does tell the servants to do whatever he tells them to do. Still, there is no direct request by Mary, and it is evident that Mary does not ...


8

There was a manuscript that began circulating in the 2nd century written by someone who called himself "Thomas the Israelite," claiming that Jesus was able to do miracles as a child. The manuscript was later given the title, "Infancy Gospel of Thomas", and you can see a full English translation here. The first story in this manuscript tells of Jesus' ...


8

Jesus was supposed to be a man of the people- that is, someone focussed on helping people get from day to day. Why do you think so? Jesus came to redeem people by his suferring and death. Not to make their life comfortable. Jesus lived in the middle-east, where there's not much water Water was not scarce in Jesus's place and during his time. I don't know ...


8

No explicit reason for Abram's victory is given, but the surrounding context can give some clues: Genesis 14:8-11 ESV Then the king of Sodom, the king of Gomorrah, the king of Admah, the king of Zeboiim, and the king of Bela (that is, Zoar) went out, and they joined battle in the Valley of Siddim with Chedorlaomer king of Elam, Tidal king of Goiim, ...


8

Earlier in John is a verse that could potentially help provide an answer to your question: Jesus answered, “The work of God is this: to believe in the one he has sent.” - John 6:29 NIV Another verse in John a little later (after the resurrection) gives further insight: Then Jesus told him, “Because you have seen me, you have believed; blessed are those ...


7

I don't have my notes on hand but the bible contains multiple examples of Satan performing God like signs to fool Gods people. The book of Revelations is the obvious example this, but there's more. As far as men performing magic, you also had Bar Jesus. Long story short, although it's not exactly a popular opinion, Satan is illustrated as a being with ...


7

When reading the gospels there seems to be two or three main problems Jesus always encountered in terms of ministry and politics. The most deadly was the jealousy and hatred of the religious leaders. Jesus often had to move away from any opportunity where they might be overly aroused and have easy access in apprehending him (Luke 20:20) Jesus seemed to ...


7

The next verse, Luke 8:26, places the event: They sailed to the region of the Gerasenes, which is across the lake from Galilee. Galilee is on the west side of the Sea of Galilee, which means that the Gerasenes were likely on the east side.


7

All the miracles haven't gone, rather The Miracle has come. John 1:14 (ESV) 14  And the Word became flesh and dwelt among us, and we have seen his glory, glory as of the only Son from the Father, full of grace and truth. All your questions come down to this. The incarnation of Christ changed the tangible state of our relationship to God. The ...


7

It is quite explicitly mentioned as a miracle from God. How else can verse 16 be interpreted? For the jar of flour was not used up and the jug of oil did not run dry, in keeping with the word of the Lord spoken by Elijah. I've highlighted "the jar" and "the jug", both singular. And it says, in keeping with the word of the Lord. So this ...


7

I will represent the Roman Catholic position on the verse. Historically, St. Thomas Aquinas noted that this verse provided an example of Jesus' healing of sin. He cites St. Augustine for the interpretation that the blind man represents the human race. Sin is the spiritual blindness. When Jesus heals the blind man and allows him to see the light, he ...


7

You need to read the rest of the passage. Verse 14 reads: For thus says the Lord, the God of Israel, ‘The jar of flour shall not be spent, and the jug of oil shall not be empty, until the day that the Lord sends rain upon the earth.’” Thus we can assume that once the rain came, and there was no longer a need for the flour and oil to be provided directly ...


7

Acts 28:27 (Matt 13:15 is almost identical) For the heart of this people is waxed gross, and their ears are dull of hearing, and their eyes have they closed; lest they should see with their eyes, and hear with their ears, and understand with their heart, and should be converted, and I should heal them. Romans 11:8 (According as it is written,...


7

Yes, Mormons believe in gifts and miracles of both spiritual and physical healing in these days. Elder Dallin H. Oaks of the Quorum of the Twelve Apostles gave a talk in 2010 called Healing the Sick. The whole talk is relevant to your question but here's a snippet (not sorry for making it essentially my whole answer): Latter-day Saints believe in ...


Only top voted, non community-wiki answers of a minimum length are eligible