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21

I'm sorry to have to tell you this, but the bible calls this necromancy and describes it as an "abominable practice": Deuteronomy 18:9-12 (ESV): 9 “When you come into the land that the Lord your God is giving you, you shall not learn to follow the abominable practices of those nations. 10 There shall not be found among you anyone who burns his son or ...


16

The meaning is pretty obvious in context. Ps 137 is a lament for Jerusalem after the Babylonians have invaded and destroyed it. Verses 7-9 make it explicit: 7 Remember, LORD, what the Edomites did on the day Jerusalem fell. “Tear it down,” they cried, “tear it down to its foundations!” 8 Daughter Babylon, doomed to destruction, ...


16

From the PoV of the Roman Catholic church, baptism is a sacrament for the living. (For that matter, so are all 7 Sacraments). Once the body dies one is subject to judgment, which in the case of individuals is particular judgment. Put simply, we have our whole life to come to Jesus, to open ourselves to salvation, and to accept God's sanctifying Grace. To ...


11

The only Catholic not permitted to be autopsied is the pope, due to Vatican protocol. At any time, a family may object to an autopsy of one of their family members, but this could be due to some a personally family reasons (perhaps a cultural one). The Catholic Church teaches that both organ transplants and autopsies are morally acceptable in our times. ...


10

That death and "sleeping," are often conflated in Scripture is perhaps a useful metaphor here. Notice how, in 1 Corinthians 15, Paul likens those who have died to those who have "fallen asleep in Christ." And if Christ has not been raised, your faith is futile; you are still in your sins. 18 Then those also who have fallen asleep in Christ are lost. 19 If ...


10

Jesus Christ, on earth, was the incarnate Word: the Second Person of the Trinity, the Son. His earthly body and the soul which animated it were both at once human and divine. To say “God died” actually denies the human soul and its continued existence after the death of the body. Even though Jesus’ body died, his soul did not — or what hope is there ...


10

Some years ago, I befriended an inmate who was scheduled to be executed and was ask to be at his execution, in order to give him any support I possible could. I prayed the act of contrition with him and encouraged him to trust in Jesus' Merciful love for sinners. In the absence of a priest, which was my case, I prayed for the inmate the best I could. Many ...


9

Proponents of penal substitution, like Louis Berkhof (ST, 6.2.1), indeed argue that Christ has "removed the penalty of sin" and that therefore "the penal element is removed from death." So why do Christians still die? Two arguments are given: God continues to use death to sanctify his followers and increase their unity with Christ Creation continues to ...


8

Jesus' body was in the tomb (Matthew 27:59ff; cp Mark 15, Luke 23, John 19). Jesus' spirit was in Paradise (Luke 23:42ff) - else He could not have truthfully promised the thief crucified with Him that "today you will be with Me in Paradise". See also Luke 16:19-31. Jesus paid our debt in completion while on the cross - while He absorbed the full wrath of ...


8

Christians from both sides of the continuation of spiritual gifts debate understand Irenaeus's quote here more charitably than Gibbon, and do not see it as evidence that people were being raised from the dead in the late 2nd century. I'll refer to the writings of cessationist B. B. Warfield and charismatic Ronald A. N. Kydd. Warfield addresses Gibbon ...


8

Essentially, the passage is simply seen as an euphemism for death — and quite a common one, given that a dead person often looks like they are sleeping: the Greek personification of sleep, Hypnos, was said to the twin brother of Death (Thanatos) by both Homer in the Illiad and Hesiod in the Theogony. The other common metaphor for death is "departing" or "...


8

Catholics and Orthodox do not subscribe to the doctrine of Sola Scriptura, which is the doctrine that says that the only source of authoritative teaching is Sacred Scripture. Instead, we rely on Apostolic Succession to show that the doctrines we hold onto are those that the Apostles taught, by tracing the teachers and the teaching in an unbroken chain back ...


7

To understand this perspective, it is better to think of "death" as "a separation", rather than "a ceasing to exist". So, when you "die", your spirit is separated from your flesh, and from this world. 1) The second death is the ultimate separation of (the spirits of) sinners from the presence of God. 2) Indeed, (the spirits of) those who are "resurrected" ...


7

Very little is said in the Bible of where Jesus was and what he was doing during the three days, but here's what we do know: He promised the thief on the cross that they would be together in paradise after death. (Luke 23:39-42) When Mary recognized him in the garden after his resurrection, he told her that he had not yet been to heaven. (John 20:15-17 ) ...


7

Sacred Tradition would say yes, the recently reworded Nicene creed says, He suffered death and was buried We also say it was in: accordance with the Scriptures which means, there's some prophecy that says this had to happen which you can read in Psalm 22 or Isaiah 53 or Genesis 22 Death is the splitting of the body, but not splitting "The Godhead" ...


7

In a family, the firstborn son had special privileges that set Him above all others. Jesus, in ushering in the resurrection for all, had the privileges of that firstborn son. Note: For a long time, I used to think of this strictly in chronological terms - but it isn't warranted. Elijah & Elisha resurrected dead people. Lazarus and Jairus' daughter ...


7

The second death recorded in the Bible story, in the lineage of Cain, first son of Adam The second death recorded in the Bible story is an unnamed man killed by Lamech son of Methushael (not to be confused with Lamech son of Methuselah and father of Noah - Genesis 5:25–30), seven generations from Adam in Cain's line: Lamech said to his wives: "Adah and ...


7

Yes, St. Polycarp (A.D. 69-155). The early Church Father St. Polycarp. He was put in fire, yet he did not burn. We read in The Martyrdom of Polycarp: This, then, was carried into effect with greater speed than it was spoken, the multitudes immediately gathering together wood and fagots out of the shops and baths; the Jews especially, according to ...


6

The ‘lake of fire’ is a final progression of the theological development of God’s judgment. The ‘lake of fire’ is a final ‘hell’ which is a New Testament description of the more generic realm of the dead previously called ‘Hades or Sheol’, in the Old Testament. The Greek Old Testament uses Hades ( ᾅδης ) for the Hebrew name Sheol ( שְׁאוֹל). To fully ...


6

Orthodoxy has a Tradition of the Dormition of Mary wherein it is belived that she didn't die but merely fell asleep and was assumed into Heaven. Catholic teaching neither affirms nor contradicts the Dormition but we have another tradition which is written in one of the apocryphal gospels ascribed to St. Thomas but written hundreds of years a after his death. ...


6

Presumably there is purpose to food other than just maintaining life. Revelation describes the New Jerusalem, which is generally equated with Heaven, the place where the saved will spend eternity. And according to Revelation 22:2, in this city, "In the middle of its street, and on either side of the river, was the tree of life, which bore twelve fruits, ...


6

Conservative Protestants typically use the phrase "intermediate state" when talking theologically about the "immediately-in-heaven" view. Wayne Grudem is a conservative Protestant representative of this view. In his book, Bible Doctrine, on page 352, Grudem writes, "The souls of believers go immediately into God's presence. Death is a temporary ...


6

Matthew 27:38-54, Mark 15:27-39, Luke 23:35-49, and John 19:23-34 describe the crucifixion and the people present and name some of them. These passages from the four canonical gospels, however, give different accounts of the number of people present and their names. Putting these accounts together, the following names can be found (or inferred): Mary (...


6

Yes, there is no doubt that Irenaeus was speaking of some raising the dead in his own time. The following extract contains the words by Irenaeus that appear to be cited by Eusebius and criticised by Gibbon. Irenaeus is comparing the powerlessness of his opponents to perform miracles with what the Christian brotherhood is capable of performing. After ...


6

According the Catechism of the Catholic Church Since Christ died for all, and since all men are in fact called to one and the same destiny, which is divine, we must hold that the Holy Spirit offers to all the possibility of being made partakers, in a way known to God, of the Paschal mystery." Every man who is ignorant of the Gospel of Christ and ...


6

TL;DR Important due to both Particular Judgment and Purgatory The form of the question. Aren't we supposed to be judged by our whole life and not just what happens at the hour of our death? Should our whole eternity be based on what we did at the hour of death and pretend like our whole earthly life didn't matter? As my answer will show, that isn't how ...


6

Fourteenth to fifteenth centuries England was Catholic. The most common hymn sung by the faithful could possibly be the Latin hymn: "In paradisum". This hymn is still quite popular and I have sung it on many occasions as the body of a defunct has been lowered into the earth at a cemetery. Traditional religious still sing this at the graveside of their ...


6

The singing of hymns as we understand them today wasn't necessarily a major part of medieval Christianity. As Ken Graham's answer says, the best known texts would have been those from the Requiem Mass, of which In Paradisum is probably the best known (along with Pie Iesu, the last part of the Dies Irae). Another common text would be the Libera Me, sung both ...


6

Are there any Saints that have miraculously overcome death (should have died, but did not)? Do not know if this counts, but it is an interesting story anyway. I personally would find it miraculous to be healed by Mary, the Mother of Jesus in person! What an honour Our Lady showed to the Carmelite saint of Palestine. St. Miriam of Jesus Crucified (January ...


5

Catholic teaching states that you must make a sincere effort to confess all mortal sins in the sacrament of confession. It is often encouraged that all grave sins be confessed as soon as possible, and certainly all mortal sins. However, if the sinner is unable to confess before death, the effortful intent to confess is taught to be valid, provided it is a ...


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