7

This is a non-starter because it rests upon multiple logical fallacies, meaning it's a non-argument for anything other than one's inability or unwillingness to be logical. Namely, it commits the Genetic Fallacy: 'x has origins in somone or something evil, therefore, x must be bad in and of itself' (e.g. 'circumcision is evil because pagans invented ...


7

During Mass, as the occasion warrants, Catholic priests/deacons (not the lay faithful) are required to: Bow before the tabernacle the first time they cross it. Kiss and incense the altar and the Gospel book during mass. Incense the Cross and the tabernacle Every Catholic as a sign of belief and respect has to bow before the alter, genuflect before the ...


6

No What is the Church's definition of a holy relic? "A relic is something connected with a saint or blessed, including a part of their body (e.g. hair or a piece of bone), their clothing, or an object that the person used or touched." Relics are classified into three categories: First Class Relics: items directly associated with the events of Christ's ...


6

This is about correct teaching and the meanings of latria and worship. TL;DR(1): if the bishops do not ensure proper teaching regarding religious images, they let the faithful down. That's where the problem started both during the Iconoclast Movements and during the Reformation where some of your points were raised. TL;DR(2): was a commandment abrogated?...


5

Of course the cross was of pagan origin and you are probably not correct that there are other "references that agree that prior to 3rd or 4th century only non Christian groups ever used the symbol of the cross in their worship." First of all let us remember that it was only in 313 with the Edict of Milan that peace was officially given to the Church and ...


4

To approach this question we must first cut through terminology. The Catholic Dictionary defines worship as Acknowledgment of another's worth, dignity, or superior position. So worship is not, necessarily, religious at all. It then goes on to define two words for worship of a particularly religious character. In religion, worship is given either ...


4

Religious Customs in the Family: The Radiation of the Liturgy into Catholic Homes by Fr. Francis X. Weiser, S.J., mentions this regarding the Feast of the Holy Innocents (a.k.a "Childermas day"): December 28, the feast of the Holy Innocents of Bethlehem, is a festive day for little children, according to ancient tradition. In Catholic families, December ...


4

Short Answer Theological & Dogmatic reference:(Summary) Lumen Gentium 66 CCC966 Archangel Greetings bowing to Mary's Divine Motherhood. (Luke1:28) 4.The 4th Dogma of the Assumption Other testimonies & revelation; i. Pre-Assumption Apparition, Ven. Mary of Agreda refer to Mary as "Queen of the Church. ii. St.James ...


3

Fergusson doesn't appear to understand Catholic mariology. Mary is not a "feminine expression of deity"; she is not a feminine aspect of God; she is not God, as Protestants often blasphemously allege Catholics believe. Although St. Gertrude the Great was not canonized, that doesn't mean this holy Benedictine is not a saint. Her feast was celebrated ...


3

It seems like you want to embrace Iconoclasm, but cannot bring yourself to leave the Barque of Peter. Unfortunately, however, I cannot write anything not backed up by sources, so I fear it will be most of what you've already read. First, the Catechism: 2129 The divine injunction included the prohibition of every representation of God by the hand of man. ...


3

Are Roman Catholics required at any time to bow down or make obeisance to or kiss statues, images, icons, etc. (i.e., inanimate objects)? The short answer is no. Basically, it is an act of personal interior pious devotion. However this ”no” needs a little more clarity to be understood. Even amongst Catholics there is a great amount of ignorance about this ...


2

Unless one is familiar with the Catholic religion, one will find it odd, if not downright sacriligious, to bow down to bread and wine (inanimate objects per the OP). From the Catechism of the Catholic Church paragraph 1378: 1378 Worship of the Eucharist. In the liturgy of the Mass we express our faith in the real presence of Christ under the species of ...


2

Most of the sources I've stumbled upon share the same information. Enjoy a direct quote from Mark Rogers' The Esoteric Codex: Magic Objects I: The sandals The sandals are the remains of an ornate fabric shoe (slipper) allegedly from the Merovingian period (fifth to eighth centuries AD), which were given to the Abbey by Rome in the Carolingian period (...


2

In one passage, we have the answer to the whole thing: 1 Chronicles 29:20 (DRB) And David commanded all the assembly: Bless ye the Lord our God. And all the assembly blessed the Lord the God of their fathers: and they bowed themselves and worshipped God, and then the king. In this culture and language, worship means a general service or demonstration of ...


2

There are 3 separate points or questions actually asked here that need to be addressed Did Jesus die on a cross or a stake? The word stauros and its definition are the problem here. Stauros meant pole in classical Greek but not Koine Greek nor in modern Greek. It means cross. Language evolves and the meaning of words change. The word crucifixtion is ...


1

Why do the Catholics and Orthodox keep relics and bone fragments? Isn't this disrespect for the body? The the Catholic and Orthodox Churches this is a theological way of honouring the saints. There will always be be those who will object to this practice either on an intellectual level or a lesser level that seems to imply that the act of distribution of ...


1

According to Justin Martyr, in "Dialogue with Trypho", Christian's should not be concerned with such things. Here are the Chapter titles which summarize the chapter, taken from the New Advent (Catholic) web site. They pretty much say it all! Chapter 69. The devil, since he emulates the truth, has invented fables about Bacchus, Hercules, and Æsculapius ...


1

On the Feast of the Holy Innocents, it has became a custom, not only in the homes of the faithful, but also in convents and monasteries to serve an extra dish consisting of a white porridge (some kind of pabulum, usually cream of wheat with milk, sugar and cinnamon) to the youngest ones children in families and to the novices (a novice in some communities is ...


1

This obviously is a big topic, so here are just a few quick notes. That there is a distinction between worship and veneration Luke 1:48: for he has looked on the humble estate of his servant. For behold, from now on all generations will call me blessed; According to the bible, all generations (that is, including ours) should call Mary blessed. ...


1

The rubrics for the pre-1955 Missale Romanum (PDF p. 326) seem to assume there is a front and back side of the cross, which could only be possible were there a corpus on it: Completis Orationibus, Sacerdos…accipit a Diacono Crucem jam in Altari præparatam: quam, versa facie ad populum… etc. The orations having been completed, the Priest…takes the ...


1

This question has been explored by Harald Haarmann in the peer-reviewed academic journal ReVision. You may need subscription to read the whole article. Many libraries have subscription to many academic, peer-reviewed journals, so if you are a member of a library, then you may access the online article or look at the article at the library. Anyway, according ...


1

As Catholics, we do not pray/worship the saints. Instead, we look at them as role models because they have already achieved Heaven, which is what we must work for. Because they are already in Heaven, we ask the saints to intercede for us to God because they are so close to Him. Our asking them to intercede is what is often mistaken as worshiping them


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