Hot answers tagged

16

The "double" cross is known as a Patriarchal cross and is well described in the Wikipedia article. There's no point in reproducing more than a sample here: The Patriarchal cross is a variant of the Christian cross, the religious symbol of Christianity. Similar to the familiar Latin cross, the Patriarchal cross possesses a smaller crossbar placed ...


11

The Catholic Encyclopedia says: The cross was originally traced by Christians with the thumb or finger on their own foreheads. This practice is attested by numberless allusions in Patristic literature. It's unclear when it began, but it's true there are "numberless allusions" indicating it was an early and widespread tradition. For example, ...


10

How much did the Cross of Jesus weigh? 30At that time ‘they will say to the mountains, “Fall on us!” and to the hills, “Cover us!”’ 31For if men do these things while the tree is green, what will happen when it is dry?” 32Two others, who were criminals, were also led away to be executed with Jesus.… - Luke 23:30-32 The Cross on which Our Savior was ...


9

The first chapter of John Stott's The Cross of Christ provides a history of the development of the use of the symbol of the cross in Christianity. I'll briefly summarize it here. Pre-cross images The earliest images used by Christians did not include the cross. Persecution required that they be circumspect, which meant that an image clearly associated with ...


9

I don't know more context for the picture, but the title "Pope visits holy site of Sermon on the Mount" indicates, that the chair is not a part of Pope's usual attributes, but that it's part of the chapel on Mount of Beatitudes. This inverted or Saint Peter's cross is not very common in catholic context, but very few Catholics would feel bad if they were on ...


7

This is a non-starter because it rests upon multiple logical fallacies, meaning it's a non-argument for anything other than one's inability or unwillingness to be logical. Namely, it commits the Genetic Fallacy: 'x has origins in somone or something evil, therefore, x must be bad in and of itself' (e.g. 'circumcision is evil because pagans invented ...


6

The Jehovah's Witnesses have addresses this issue. From their web site: https://www.jw.org/en/bible-teachings/questions/did-jesus-die-on-cross/ Many view the cross as the most common symbol of Christianity. However, the Bible does not describe the instrument of Jesus’ death, so no one can know its shape with absolute certainty. Still, the Bible ...


6

This question could also entail those who lived prior to the giving of the law, such as Abraham. Paul gives us the answer in his letter to the Romans. But now the righteousness of God has been manifested apart from the law, although the Law and the Prophets bear witness to it— 22 the righteousness of God through faith in Jesus Christ for all who believe. ...


6

He was both, but offered Himself, His own body as the perfect sacrifice. The book of Hebrews goes into great details. If you have a little time, read an overview commentary of Hebrews; if you have a medium amount of time, read a study Bible or commentary that goes verse by verse; If you have a lot of time, I strongly recommend the Naked Bible podcast by Dr. ...


5

Jesus exact words were "Eli, Eli, lama sabacthani." (Matt 27:46) Eli-jah (literally YHWH - jah is God (El) of mine (i)) would be shortened as "Eli". Since they are the same word, in the bustle of a crowd, it is not at all unlikely that this "prophet" would be thought to be calling Elijah. Remember, just because the words were in Psalm 22, doesn't mean the ...


5

The symbol is a coat of arms, probably from Catholicism, Anglicanism, or perhaps, but less likely, Orthodoxy. The mitre indicates that it was used by a Bishop, but not a Pope, as a Pope's coat of arms would include keys. The coat of arms of the British Bishop, Thomas Burns contains similarities: the mitre on the top, the two devices from the mitre down the ...


5

The term "Holy Cross" refers specifically to the cross on which Jesus died, the place where he sacrificed himself for us to redeem us from our sins, and to reconcile us to God the Father. It doesn't refer to crosses in general, and not to any representation of the cross. It is absolutely true that crosses in general were place of torture, pain, suffering a ...


5

There are at least two questions here, probably three. What would his hearers have understood by it before and after his arrest and crucifixion? And again after his resurrection? Jesus spoke in Aramaic, translated into Greek by Luke and later into English. To complicate things further, the word he used for cross was probably the Latin furca, a fork. This was ...


5

just an update on the cross I found. The British Museum have reviewed it and come back with their findings. It is taking an age to further process due to Covid. The artefact has been declared as treasure. They however appear a little lost in defining it's exact age, given the age mix of the design attributes/styles. They are not aware of anything else which ...


5

How do Catholics respond to the claims that the cross has pagan origins? Of course the cross was of pagan origin and you are probably not correct that there are other "references that agree that prior to 3rd or 4th century only non Christian groups ever used the symbol of the cross in their worship." First of all let us remember that it was only in ...


4

The way it was explained to me once is that it was a literal interpretation of Christ's commission to take up the cross and follow him. "Then said Jesus unto his disciples, If any man will come after me, let him deny himself, and take up his cross, and follow me." (Matt 16:24; see also Mark 8:34; Luke 9:23; Matt 10:21;) The Encyclopedia Britannica ...


4

Long before the cross was the staple of Christianity, Heraldic symbolism was used to help identify units on the battlefield. The two places in which the symbol of the cross featured most prominently were in divisions and in Ordinaries (the primary symbols on the emblem). From the Wikipedia article on Heraldry in relation to Ordinaries,: In the early days ...


4

The best way to answer this question is to look at what the Book of Mormon says about it. Here are two illustrative quotes: For behold, he surely must die that salvation may come; yea, it behooveth him and becometh expedient that he dieth, to bring to pass the resurrection of the dead, that thereby men may be brought into the presence of the Lord. --...


4

This is not a literal cross. Cross deals with the common trials ,problems, sickness, temptations, and persecutions encountered by Christians. Sometimes serving the Lord requires some suffering, the following verses explains it. Philippians 1:29 ~ For unto you it is given in the behalf of Christ, not only to believe on him, but also to suffer for his sake; ...


4

Eugène Vintras (1807–1875) may be the first to use the inverted cross in a distinctly anti-Christian way. He was a Gnostic revivalist operating in France during the middle of the 19th century. He preached the end of the age, and claimed to have received messages from Michael the Archangel and that he himself was a reincarnation of Elijah. He was condemned ...


4

It represents the piece of wood (part of the cross) upholding or supporting the victim's feet; one can get a much clearer view of it in icons depicting Christ's crucifixion.


3

Jesus was all about counting the cost of being His followers. To them He promised a life of self-denial, difficulty, and even death. All but one of His original disciples, tradition has it, met an untimely death, becoming martyrs for the faith. John, alone, likely died of old age during his exile on the island of Patmos. With this concept of self-denial and ...


3

What is an Idol? From the first two commandments: Exodus 20:3-5a (ASV) Thou shalt not make unto thee a graven image, nor any likeness [of any thing] that is in heaven above, or that is in the earth beneath, or that is in the water under the earth. 5 Thou shalt not bow down thyself unto them, nor serve them I think this very clearly describes what is ...


3

According to the Catholic Encyclopedia of 1913, whilst the cross was already a symbol of Christianity in the second century (Tertullian says: "We Christians wear out our foreheads with the sign of the cross" [De Cor. mil. iii]), the cross was seen as a punishment and hence a humiliation: Seeing that the cross was the symbol of an ignominious death, the ...


3

Your question reminds me distinctly of the opening chapter of G.K. Chesteron's "The Ball and the Cross" where Michael (possibly St. Michael, not sure) tells a story about an atheist who see crosses everywhere (bedposts and wants to break them all up. Interestingly enough, GKC did write in the end of an essay on something very similar to "...


3

Can a novel interpretation of John 15 be supported by art in church history? I believe it is quite possible. The Vine and the Branches 15 “I am the true vine, and my Father is the gardener. 2 He cuts off every branch in me that bears no fruit, while every branch that does bear fruit he prunes so that it will be even more fruitful. 3 You are already clean ...


2

In the Gospels, when we read about Jesus's Passion( the carrying of the cross to the Place called The Skull), the only disciples that had the courage, strength, and love to walk with Christ was Mary and the women of Jerusalem. So you are probably asking why we don't ask Jesus, right? Well, first of all, don't think that Jesus is not the Mediator for ...


2

As an Eastern rite Catholic, we have our priest holding crucifix to bless us during each divine liturgy. Because Roman rite Catholic, Eastern rite Catholic, Eastern Orthodox, Oriental Orthodox (non-Chalcedonian), and Assyrian Church (non-Ephesian) use crucifix we can safely estimate that this practice date from the early church before schism happened for the ...


2

”The shape of the [two-beamed cross] had its origin in ancient Chaldea, and was used as the symbol of the god Tammuz (being in the shape of the mystic Tau, the initial of his name) in that country and in adjacent lands, including Egypt. By the middle of the 3rd cent. A.D. the churches had either departed from, or had travestied, certain doctrines of the ...


2

The practice of wearing crosses around the neck dates from the early church. The precise reason why Christians began wearing crosses has to do with martyrdom, specifically beheading. In the early centuries of the church, when many Christians were put to death as a result of confessing belief in Christ, the most common way to die (sometimes following a series ...


Only top voted, non community-wiki answers of a minimum length are eligible