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20

This question was answered directly by Gordon B. Hinckley, who was the most recent president of the church before the current one. In an article in 2005, he wrote: “I do not wish to give offense to any of my Christian colleagues who use the cross on the steeples of their cathedrals and at the altars of their chapels, who wear it on their vestments, ...


17

First, understanding that this is not a site to learn about Truth, but rather to learn about Christianity - what the various teachings are from an academic perspective, the question "Which is true" is off-topic. However, we could take a couple of approaches that would be within the bounds of the site: Answering what various denominations believe about ...


16

The "double" cross is known as a Patriarchal cross and is well described in the Wikipedia article. There's no point in reproducing more than a sample here: The Patriarchal cross is a variant of the Christian cross, the religious symbol of Christianity. Similar to the familiar Latin cross, the Patriarchal cross possesses a smaller crossbar placed ...


13

Contrary to conventional wisdom, the Mormon disdain for the symbol was more of a late development in Church history, emerging at the grassroots around the turn of the 20th century, and was institutionalized in the 1950s under the direction of President David O. McKay, on grounds that it was a Catholic symbol. Prior to this time, many Latter-day Saints (...


11

From the True to the Faith entry for "Cross": The cross is used in many Christian churches as a symbol of the Savior’s death and Resurrection and as a sincere expression of faith. As members of The Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints, we also remember with reverence the suffering of the Savior. But because the Savior lives, we do not use the ...


10

The Catholic Encyclopedia says: The cross was originally traced by Christians with the thumb or finger on their own foreheads. This practice is attested by numberless allusions in Patristic literature. It's unclear when it began, but it's true there are "numberless allusions" indicating it was an early and widespread tradition. For example, ...


9

Mary is the mother of the incarnation. If the incarnation matters, then Mary matters. Mary matters because God mattered to Mary. Mary said “be it unto me according to thy word”. John 1:1-14 In the beginning was the Word, and the Word was with God, and the Word was God. The same was in the beginning with God. All things were made by him; and without ...


9

The first chapter of John Stott's The Cross of Christ provides a history of the development of the use of the symbol of the cross in Christianity. I'll briefly summarize it here. Pre-cross images The earliest images used by Christians did not include the cross. Persecution required that they be circumspect, which meant that an image clearly associated with ...


9

How much did the Cross of Jesus weigh? 30At that time ‘they will say to the mountains, “Fall on us!” and to the hills, “Cover us!”’ 31For if men do these things while the tree is green, what will happen when it is dry?” 32Two others, who were criminals, were also led away to be executed with Jesus.… - Luke 23:30-32 The Cross on which Our Savior was ...


8

I don't see how to answer this without copying and pasting the entire resolution from the other site, but in summary, each person documented what they heard, and in total we can deduce what he actually said, which is, all in a loud voice, "My God, my God, why hast thou forsaken me?", then "Father, unto thy hands I commend my spirit:"and finally, "It is ...


8

A priest whom I highly respect and recommend his homilies almost always ends with a "turn to Mary". I'm glad the Pope's saying the same thing I've always heard him say and the same thing the Catholic Church has always said. The Incarnation is the truth that God saved the world through through the birth of a child. Have this mind among yourselves, ...


8

I don't know more context for the picture, but the title "Pope visits holy site of Sermon on the Mount" indicates, that the chair is not a part of Pope's usual attributes, but that it's part of the chapel on Mount of Beatitudes. This inverted or Saint Peter's cross is not very common in catholic context, but very few Catholics would feel bad if they were on ...


7

This is a non-starter because it rests upon multiple logical fallacies, meaning it's a non-argument for anything other than one's inability or unwillingness to be logical. Namely, it commits the Genetic Fallacy: 'x has origins in somone or something evil, therefore, x must be bad in and of itself' (e.g. 'circumcision is evil because pagans invented ...


6

This question could also entail those who lived prior to the giving of the law, such as Abraham. Paul gives us the answer in his letter to the Romans. But now the righteousness of God has been manifested apart from the law, although the Law and the Prophets bear witness to it— 22 the righteousness of God through faith in Jesus Christ for all who believe. ...


6

Jesus was speaking prophetically of what would occur to His people Israel--not just women--in both AD 70, when the Roman general Titus sacked Jerusalem, and in an unspecified time when the whole world, including Israel, would experience the wrath of God during the Great Tribulation, which is described in detail in the Revelation of Jesus Christ. In other ...


6

Having buried my mother last week after seeing her go through progressively worse interventions due to complications from her pneumonia, I can only say that I wish more people would ask this question. Any Christianity that ignores the question of suffering neither addresses the reality of the Sin nor the biblical witness. The question of suffering is central ...


6

That it was "an unfortunate event, and not at all the way God for planned to things to go" is not the teaching of the Mormon Church, as Mormons believe the Atonement happened precisely the way God willed it to happen and that it was perfect beyond our comprehension. The official doctrinal stance of the LDS church on the death and resurrection of Jesus ...


6

You're thinking too hard, and not quite straight. Obviously Jesus didn't not experience everything. Your example is pretty convoluted but lets do an easier one. As a sinless man, there is at least one emotion Jesus didn't experience: a guilty conscience. God "made him to be sin who knew no sin", so he experienced in some fashion what it was like to be ...


6

Based on my personal experience as a lifelong Roman Catholic, I offer the following brief insight. First, the sign of the cross is just the that: the sign of the CROSS, the cross upon which Christ's blood was spilled in atonement for our sins and to redeem us. That's powerful in and of itself. Second, in a Catholic mass, when the sign of the cross is ...


6

The Jehovah's Witnesses have addresses this issue. From their web site: https://www.jw.org/en/bible-teachings/questions/did-jesus-die-on-cross/ Many view the cross as the most common symbol of Christianity. However, the Bible does not describe the instrument of Jesus’ death, so no one can know its shape with absolute certainty. Still, the Bible ...


5

There are at least two questions here, probably three. What would his hearers have understood by it before and after his arrest and crucifixion? And again after his resurrection? Jesus spoke in Aramaic, translated into Greek by Luke and later into English. To complicate things further, the word he used for cross was probably the Latin furca, a fork. This was ...


5

The term "Holy Cross" refers specifically to the cross on which Jesus died, the place where he sacrificed himself for us to redeem us from our sins, and to reconcile us to God the Father. It doesn't refer to crosses in general, and not to any representation of the cross. It is absolutely true that crosses in general were place of torture, pain, suffering a ...


5

The symbol is a coat of arms, probably from Catholicism, Anglicanism, or perhaps, but less likely, Orthodoxy. The mitre indicates that it was used by a Bishop, but not a Pope, as a Pope's coat of arms would include keys. The coat of arms of the British Bishop, Thomas Burns contains similarities: the mitre on the top, the two devices from the mitre down the ...


5

Jesus exact words were "Eli, Eli, lama sabacthani." (Matt 27:46) Eli-jah (literally YHWH - jah is God (El) of mine (i)) would be shortened as "Eli". Since they are the same word, in the bustle of a crowd, it is not at all unlikely that this "prophet" would be thought to be calling Elijah. Remember, just because the words were in Psalm 22, doesn't mean the ...


5

Of course the cross was of pagan origin and you are probably not correct that there are other "references that agree that prior to 3rd or 4th century only non Christian groups ever used the symbol of the cross in their worship." First of all let us remember that it was only in 313 with the Edict of Milan that peace was officially given to the Church and ...


5

He was both, but offered Himself, His own body as the perfect sacrifice. The book of Hebrews goes into great details. If you have a little time, read an overview commentary of Hebrews; if you have a medium amount of time, read a study Bible or commentary that goes verse by verse; If you have a lot of time, I strongly recommend the Naked Bible podcast by Dr. ...


4

There is no prohibition against using the sign of the cross as a Protestant. Yet, there is no Biblical command to use it either. The same is true of closing your eyes when you pray, and even praying before meals. Yet, the sign of the Cross, as I understand it, is used at the close of prayers. We are commanded to pray in the Name of Jesus, but not that of ...


4

The way it was explained to me once is that it was a literal interpretation of Christ's commission to take up the cross and follow him. "Then said Jesus unto his disciples, If any man will come after me, let him deny himself, and take up his cross, and follow me." (Matt 16:24; see also Mark 8:34; Luke 9:23; Matt 10:21;) The Encyclopedia Britannica ...


4

Long before the cross was the staple of Christianity, Heraldic symbolism was used to help identify units on the battlefield. The two places in which the symbol of the cross featured most prominently were in divisions and in Ordinaries (the primary symbols on the emblem). From the Wikipedia article on Heraldry in relation to Ordinaries,: In the early days ...


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