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Why do churches like the Catholic Church permit icons when idolatry is forbidden? The simple answer is that they do not consider all images to be idols (just think of photographs), and believe that members of the Church are able to distinguish between a work of art and God without the need for direct enforcement: after all, Catholics believe that the Word ...


8

Yes, there are lots of examples! There are still professional Iconographers who go around painting Iconography for a living! In the Orthodox Church the Temples are traditionally fully covered in frescoes. Here is an example: Since this is a great part of the Orthodox Church, there are many people who have been trained in this Holy Art and are going around ...


7

During Mass, as the occasion warrants, Catholic priests/deacons (not the lay faithful) are required to: Bow before the tabernacle the first time they cross it. Kiss and incense the altar and the Gospel book during mass. Incense the Cross and the tabernacle Every Catholic as a sign of belief and respect has to bow before the alter, genuflect before the ...


7

The remains of an ancient Jewish Synagogue have been found at a site known as Dura-Europos. Inside this Jewish Synagogue, all the walls are covered in frescoes of scenes from the Tanakh, which date to about 250 AD.


7

Why is the Ichthys symbol almost always facing left? No theological or symbolic reason seems to available as an answer. But I suspect that it may have to do something with the simple direction of which people are accustomed to write. When text is added to the symbol, for example 'Jesus' or 'ΙΧΘΥΣ', aesthetically it looks better to have the first letter ...


6

I have never heard either of any rule about not buying icons. If we all waited until we received them as gifts, we’d probably have very few, and we might wait our whole lives and never get any. And when would churches get them? So rarely they would never have proper iconostases. But an icon emits Divine Energy¹, which is also known as the Grace of God, so ...


5

As others pointed out Synagogue had painting in them as early as 250 A.D. But Catholics and Orthodox Justify having statues because God did not forbid Jews the religious usage of statues; He forbade the worship of statues. God commanded Jews to make statues, “You shall make two cherubim of gold, make them of hammered work at the two ends of the mercy seat.”...


5

As long as we're talking about using icons in worship and not worshiping icons: The very earliest written account of icons in general that I'm aware of comes in Eusebius' Ecclesiastical History written in the early 4th century before and during the reign of Constantine (it is regarded as the very first history of the Christian church ever written): I do ...


5

There are certainly modern iconographers. I have a small icon I bought in Walsingham (in Norfolk, UK), which is painted and uses gold leaf in the traditional Orthodox style. Not a particularly good photo of it, but here it is: about 8" × 5". And Sergei Fyodorov (b. 1959) has executed a number of commissions for English cathedrals: an icon of Saint ...


5

As a member of the Russian Orthodox Church, I'm not aware of any such rules. It is recommended to buy icons in churches or church stores rather than secular ones, though.


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Christ and the Believer Icon (Companion Icon) origin? Icon of Friendship as it is commonly called goes by a few similar titles. This is a 6 century Coptic icon from Bawit, Egypt of Christ and Saint Mina. Its’ author is unknown and is one of the oldest known icons in existence. It can be viewed at the Louvre, where it is now on display.


4

There are no such problem to show the violence in icons in orthodoxy. There are many icons of martyrs, which shows their suffers on. Like behading or quartering. The sample the that kind of icons are: Icon of Daniel the Prophet and the three children: and St.Sebastian of Mediolan:


4

To approach this question we must first cut through terminology. The Catholic Dictionary defines worship as Acknowledgment of another's worth, dignity, or superior position. So worship is not, necessarily, religious at all. It then goes on to define two words for worship of a particularly religious character. In religion, worship is given either ...


4

Short Answer Theological & Dogmatic reference:(Summary) Lumen Gentium 66 CCC966 Archangel Greetings bowing to Mary's Divine Motherhood. (Luke1:28) 4.The 4th Dogma of the Assumption Other testimonies & revelation; i. Pre-Assumption Apparition, Ven. Mary of Agreda refer to Mary as "Queen of the Church. ii. St.James ...


4

Here is another icon of St. Sophia and her three daughters St. Faith, St. Hope and St. Charity: Martyr Sophia and her three daughters at Rome The Holy Martyrs Saint Sophia and her Daughters Faith, Hope and Love were born in Italy. Their mother was a pious Christian widow who named her daughters for the three Christian virtues. Faith was twelve, Hope was ...


4

For that vast majority of Christians that do not prohibit images, this is an easy question to answer. The original wording of the 10 commandments did not prohibit all images - it was intended to prohibit the creation of idols for worship, i,e, man-made things that were used as Gods, which was the common practice of Israel's neighbours. That it ws not ...


3

Why is the square a symbol of the Melchizedek Priesthood? Short answer is because it's on the altar cloth with Melchizedek on the mosaic. I've been unable to find any ancient reference to the eight pointed star referred to or necessarily associated with Melchizedek. Henry Pelham Holmes Bromwell, a mason, in his book Restorations of Masonic Geometry and ...


3

Wordpress: Ancient Greek and Roman orators used an established series of hand gestures when speaking. Since some of the oldest Orthodox statuary originated in Rome, it is likely their hand gestures were adapted from those of the Greek and Roman works when depicting religious figures to emphasize the message the painter or sculptor wished to convey. Since ...


3

Are Roman Catholics required at any time to bow down or make obeisance to or kiss statues, images, icons, etc. (i.e., inanimate objects)? The short answer is no. Basically, it is an act of personal interior pious devotion. However this ”no” needs a little more clarity to be understood. Even amongst Catholics there is a great amount of ignorance about this ...


3

In the Biblical sense, "icon" and "image" are synonymous. The word icon comes directly from the Greek εἰκών (eikōn). In the Septuagint, it represents the Hebrew word צלמ (Masoretic צֶ֫לֶם; ṣě·lěm), as in Genesis 1:26: And God said, Let us make man in our image [eikōn], after our likeness The Law of Moses explicitly required use of ...


3

First off, Catholics do not believe Mary is "present in the icon" in the same way we believe Jesus is present in the Eucharist in a particularly physical way (the Eucharist, or physical incarnation of Jesus on Earth, is the only actual physical thing that Catholics worship to my knowledge). Though Mary, like all the other saints (and of course our omniscient ...


3

Air kisses are totally fine. The purpose of the kiss is to show reverence to that which the icon portrays, whether it is of Christ, the Theotokos or a Saint. Depending on the ethnicity of the Church you attend, you may see people prostrate (bow fully and touch their hand to the floor), or kneel down and fully touch their head to the floor. Some do this ...


3

Yes, for example, the vesica pisces is a newer invention. Sure some will argue that the fish has always been a Christian symbol, however the modern / Christian usage of the vesica pisces is not the same symbol used in the early church as seen below. vs


3

See the Catholic Encyclopedia: Halos were used in art among the pagans long before the Christian Era. In the monuments of Hellenic and Roman art, the heads of the gods, heroes, and other distinguished persons are often found with a disc-shaped halo, a circle of light, or a rayed-fillet. This iconography was later adopted as a sacred symbol by both Buddhism ...


3

The painting most probably comes from Byzantine Tradition as we can see the use of gold a well-known attritube of most of the Orthodox artist in expressing their views or faith. The symbol ICXC in the middle of the painting with overline make certainty that this artwork belong to Eastern or Byzantine Tradition and there's no Muslim iconography here as it ...


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"Plenka" means "skin" or "membrane" in this context and refer to material covering the icon. The icon itself called "all saints" and depicts major saints in order of their festive days during year. Twelve big sections correspond to months, starting from January. Big caption above the section is month name. Small captions inside each section contain festive ...


2

While I cannot tell you when the practice of wearing an empty cross began, I can give you the reason that I was given for doing so. As a Southern Baptist I was taught that the empty cross symbolizes that Jesus is no longer dead, but that he took up his life again as he said he would. This is not my interpretation nor is it my feeling, I wear a crucifix ...


2

Unless one is familiar with the Catholic religion, one will find it odd, if not downright sacriligious, to bow down to bread and wine (inanimate objects per the OP). From the Catechism of the Catholic Church paragraph 1378: 1378 Worship of the Eucharist. In the liturgy of the Mass we express our faith in the real presence of Christ under the species of ...


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