17

You are correct that most Protestants do not see the bread and wine as anything more than symbols. There is no blessing that is ever attempted to transform the elements into the literal body and blood of Christ. Consequently, the bread and wine (or juice) that could be stored for long periods of time prior to the observance of the Eucharist (the Lord's ...


15

Why do Christians stand to sing ? I think the reasons are fundamental to the act, so I do not see biblical instructions or precedents to be relevant. One may ask, how one should eat a meal : should one sit, or recline ? One may ask, how should one read the bible : should one be seated or kneeling ? These are matters of preference and matters of practicality,...


13

Yes, prior to the promulgation of the Novus Ordo Mass finished by 1970, Latin was the language used at Mass throughout the world. The change to the vernacular didn't change the official language of the Catholic Church which is Latin. Many parts of the Mass are still (or can be) proclaimed in Latin. If you've got some time, watch or listen to the Mass on ...


13

This practice is attested as early as the first half of the third century, by Tertullian and particularly Hippolytus. Tertullian addresses the topic tangentially while addressing the dangers of women marrying non-Christians. Their husbands will notice their Christian practices, such as fasting before taking communion, and may put pressure on them to stop: ...


11

Why does the Catholic church have so many Masses throughout the week? It is because of what Mass is to the catholic church. Mass is the Single most important commandment given by Christ to do until the end of times (Do this in remembrance of me Lk 22 / 1 Cor 11). "At the Last Supper, on the night he was betrayed, our Savior instituted the Eucharistic ...


11

Communion under Both Kinds article at Catholic Encyclopedia has answer to both of your questions Does anyone know when this practice first became accepted? During early times public Communion in the churches was received under both kinds. But side by side with the regular liturgical usage of Communion, there existed from the earliest times the custom of ...


11

It goes all the way back to Genesis 29:35 at least with Leah raising her hands in praise to YHWH in naming Judah. As a Biblical Hebrew professor thinking in Hebrew, I find the Old Testament full of hand raising. After the most frequent verb for spoken praise HaLeL (Strong's #1984 & 8416), the word most translated (53 times) as "praise" is the verb YaDaH (...


11

It is indeed about the Pharisees. Here's what Shmuel Safrai's paper “Religion in Everyday Life" says: Mondays and Thursdays, which were synagogue days, when country-folk came to town and the courts sat and the Torah was read, were the favoured days for public and private fasts. People would assemble for prayer, mention the reason for the fast, as follows ...


10

How do practicing Catholics keep track of all the sins they commit before going to Confession? They don't keep track of sins. Before going to confession they do something called examination of conscience. This is in layman term trying to recall all the sin one has committed. An examination of conscience is a “prayerful self-reflection on our words and ...


10

Do Christian concepts of fellowship allow for a congregation to welcome atheists to participate in their community? In the most general terms, yes - most congregations are open to non-member participation. Saying that, it is possible different congregations have a nuanced stance in this regard - some of their meetings may be closed and it is best to ask ...


10

Latter-day Saints in other countries do not typically sing United States patriotic songs. The full LDS hymnbook is currently published in 38 languages. The English hymnbook has 341 hymns, including four patriotic songs: America the Beautiful (USA) My Country, ’Tis of Thee (USA) The Star-Spangled Banner (USA) God Save the King (United Kingdom) For a short ...


9

A great deal of early Church art showed baptism being done in the nude. This would not have been shocking in the world of the early Church, as many early Christians were slaves. Most slaves in the Roman world owned no more than one garment, and many were given no clothing at all, particularly those who mainly performed hard physical labor. Below are some ...


9

This is in fact a Christian tradition coming from Paul: I commend you because you remember me in everything and maintain the traditions just as I handed them on to you. But I want you to understand that Christ is the head of every man, and the husband is the head of his wife, and God is the head of Christ. Any man who prays or prophesies with something on ...


8

This is an old question, but I'll answer anyway. The Orthodox Christian Church baptizes in the nude because most baptisms are performed on very young (less than 1 year old) babies. The children are nude and fully immersed. The service is pretty much exactly as you'd see in Hippolytus. Adults who are baptized are permitted to wear a robe or bathing suit for ...


8

Roman Catholic nuns consider themselves a "Bride of Christ," and as such some wear a wedding ring. This of course assumes that the nun you saw was a Roman Catholic nun. Some nuns (or similar laity, such as Lutheran deaconesses) in other faiths are not bound by the same celibacy vows or simply do not wear wedding rings. More information: Wikipedia - Black ...


8

Catholicism doesn't currently set a specific age at which First Communion is taken. The New Advent article on Communion of Children says this (Emphasis mine): The existing legislation with regard to the Communion of children has been definitely settled by the Fourth Lateran Council, which was afterwards confirmed by the authority of the Council of ...


8

(Although I can't speak for all Presbyterians, as we are diverse bunch, I think that what I say here is representative of the mainstream. I welcome correction if I am wrong about this.) When Communion is served, we do use a table of some kind. The table recalls the Last Supper, at which the practice of Communion was instituted; Matthew 26:20, Mark 14:18, ...


8

There is currently no requirement in the Catholic Church that women or girls wear a veil. This has technically only been the case since 1983, when the current code of canon law was promulgated. The 1917 Code of Canon Law did enforce this as a rule: Viri in ecclesia vel extra ecclesiam, dum sacris ritibus assistunt, nudo capite sint, nisi aliud ferant ...


8

The simplifying or outright dismantling of liturgies has been in train since the beginning of the Reformation, particularly as it started to unfold in Switzerland under Huldrych Zwingli. From the linked Wikipedia article: Shortly before Easter (1525), Zwingli and his closest associates requested the council to cancel the mass and to introduce the new ...


7

I asked the same question to the Priest who lead our (it was my wife and my honeymoon) pilgrimage for the 2005 World Youth Day in Cologne, Germany. His answer was, It's like a renaissance festival for young(ish) Catholics. And, since I've never been to a renaissance festival, but I have been to a World Yotuth Day, I think I agree. Of the few that I've ...


7

Episcopalians: The ushers count the congregation and count the wafers to match. If they miscounted the Priest in charge reserves the wafers in a "tabernacle" on the altar. They drink all of the wine/water. If a wafer is dropped it is retrieved quickly and consumed by the Priest. Whether or not individuals believe the wafer is the actual body of Christ is ...


7

It is the English translation of Deo Gratias, which is repeated “in thanksgiving for the graces received at Mass” (Catholic Encyclopedia).


7

The name 'devotionals' is actually fairly common, not just among high-church Christians. I've heard it used by Baptists, Mennonites, Anglicans of different persuasions and all sorts of people. There's nothing special about the name. "Our Daily Bread" describes itself as a 'daily devotional' and is certainly not 'high church'. The same applies to devotionals ...


7

Is it appropriate for a Catholic to make the sign of the cross when passing an Eastern Orthodox, Oriental Orthodox or Church of the East church? Of course it is! It is also a tradition for some Catholics to make the sign of the cross when passing in front of cemeteries, whether a Catholic one or otherwise. Of course there would be some of the faithful ...


6

As a very preliminary point, there are several "Rites" within the Roman Catholic Church1 and some of them have never had, and never will have, Latin liturgical services. So all of the below applies specifically to the Roman Rite (which is the most widespread by far). To lay the basic groundwork: Latin is still the official liturgical language of the Roman ...


6

As a Soldier of The Salvation Army, I wear my uniform, in the same way others might wear a cross around their neck or something, the uniform identifies the wearer as a soldier of The Salvation Army, but more importantly as a Christian. This excerpt from the New Zealand. Fiji, Tonga Website answers the questions "Does a soldier have to wear the uniform, and ...


6

No (though it does vary by church) One very influential Southern Baptist church is Capitol Hill Baptist Church, where Mark Dever is the Senior Pastor. Dever is well known as the author of Nine Marks of a Healthy Church (and founder of the associated ministry). One of the nine marks is church membership, in a much more prominent way than I've heard of in any ...


6

As far as why individual Catholics participate in the various liturgies and sacraments, there can be all sorts of reasons, from the highly religious to the merely social or cultural. The Church does have teachings on the subject, though; let's look at those. As far as going to Mass on Sundays (and some other days): This is a requirement for Catholics. In ...


6

This is not clear purely from Church law, but it appears unlikely. Canon 752, section 1 of the 1917 Code of Canon Law reads: Adultus, nisi sciens et volens probeque instructus, ne baptizetur; insuper admonendus ut de peccatis suis doleat. That is: An adult is not to be baptized, unless knowing and willing, and having been properly instructed; moreover ...


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