Hot answers tagged

34

Yes and no. Yes The LDS believe they are the true Church of Jesus Christ, which was lost through apostasy, was brought back as it originally existed when organized by Jesus Christ 1 1 Nephi 13:1-9 mentions a great and abominable church and LDS manuals explain this with the following commentary: “In relation to the kingdom of God, the devil always sets up ...


31

Good question with a simple answer: No. Categorically no. All mainline Protestants (and actually most branches of Christianity including Catholic and Orthodox) believe that they are radically different. "Categorically" different if I may overload that word. Jesus is God. Son of God in that he is the "son" part of the Trinity, but the very person of God, ...


31

If they were wearing name tags, they were probably official LDS missionaries. Even if not, Latter-day Saints are allowed to (and in fact, are encouraged to) proselytize informally and refer potential converts to official LDS missionaries. The LDS have a specific set of procedures and practices for seeking out, encouraging, vetting, and accepting new members, ...


31

There are many doctrinal and practical differences between Jehovah's Witnesses and Mormons. I think it will be difficult to arrange a complete and comprehensive list, but below are a collection of differences that immediately come to mind. Mormons claim to be a restoration of ancient Christianity via divine intervention and angelic visitation. Jehovah's ...


27

Before we start to answer this, a little history is needed. Both the Latter-Day Saints and Jehovah's Witnesses are Restorationist churches. That means that they were founded on the belief that all the other churches in the world had ceased to hold to the whole correct Christian doctrine, and that a direct revelation from God to the founders caused them to ...


27

First, I am slightly surprised that you've never seen Mormons use the Book of Mormon to teach/establish doctrine. (Talk to the missionaries; I bet they'll use the Book of Mormon quite extensively.) This was a bit tricky to think of at first, since the Bible does indeed mention the main, important doctrines. Because of that, the Latter-day Saints use the ...


26

No, not really. While you sometimes find them lumped together they are not a subset of the class. In popular usage such as among modern secular journalism, the term "Protestant" has come to mean anything that doesn't properly fall under the umbrella of either Catholicism or Orthodoxy. In this sense where there is no "Option D, none of the above", it sort of ...


26

There are a number of reasons you could name. Historically, you could point to the experience of the Latter-day Saints in the 1800s which was one mass exodus after another. Emergency prepardness was life or death. Culturally, there is a strong emphasis on hard work and temporal self-reliance (probably carried over from those early pioneer days). ...


23

Mormons believe both passages, That Adam and Eve were commanded to multiply (Genesis 1:28). Unless these partook of the fruit of the tree of knowledge Adam and Eve could not have children (2 Nephi 2:23). Also, God commanded them not to partake of the tree of knowledge of good and evil (Genesis 2:17). So really, the contradiction in Mormon belief seems to ...


22

There seems to be two questions here. First, "why are LDS temple ceremonies kept secret, seeing as how Old Testament temple ceremonies were not?" The simple answer is that the Old Testament temples operated under the Law of Moses and were administered by the Levitical priesthood, whereas modern temples operate under the Law of the Gospel and are ...


22

Latter-Day Saints do not consider themselves to be Protestants. The most fundamental concept of the Protestant tradition is an attempt to replace Catholic traditions and Catholic theology with a reformed theology derived from reading the Bible and attempting to interpret it properly. Latter-Day Saints believe that this is impossible to do successfully; that ...


21

The testimonies of these "lists of witnesses" is included in the introduction to the Book of Mormon, in which they explain what they saw and experienced. From the testimony of the Three Witnesses: And we also testify that we have seen the engravings which are upon the plates; and they have been shown unto us by the power of God, and not of man. And ...


21

College Students Looking for Loopholes... I would not be surprised if this was practiced by some students at BYU. But if it has happened, then it is a misbehaviour amongst select groups of naive students, it is most certainly not a church practice, as it is a clear violation of the law of Chastity. BYU has a very strict code of conduct, which essentially ...


20

To understand the answer, it's important to understand the actual invitation. It can be found in the last chapter of the Book of Mormon: Moroni 10: 4-5 4 And when ye shall receive these things, I would exhort you that ye would ask God, the Eternal Father, in the name of Christ, if these things are not true; and if ye shall ask with a sincere ...


20

I served as an LDS missionary for two years and I think it can be predominantly attributed to a few simple things. 8-12 weeks in the Missionary Training Center where you study the language for at least 6-8 hours of the day have a big effect. We had experienced teachers that also went through the learning process. After a few weeks of study, we were asked to ...


20

It is not the trinitarian language, it is the language with which Christ commanded his disciples to go and baptize: Go ye therefore, and teach all nations, baptizing them in the name of the Father, and of the Son, and of the Holy Ghost: (Matt 28:19) Trinitarianism interprets this to mean one God with three personages. The fulness of the gospel defines ...


20

Joseph Smith did not just translate the Book of Mormon into Jacobean English, but into a very specific type of Jacobean English, as used in the King James Version of the Bible (KJV). W. H Stevenson (King James's Bible: A Selection, 'The Language of AV' - ebook) says King James was a virtual contemporary of William Shakespeare, but that the language is not ...


19

According to lds.org: As members of The Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints, we are blessed to be led by living prophets—inspired men called to speak for the Lord, as did Moses, Isaiah, Peter, Paul, Nephi, Mormon, and other prophets of the scriptures. We sustain the President of the Church as prophet, seer, and revelator—the only person on the ...


19

Dr. Hugh Nibley, an LDS scholar who did extensive research on the Book of Mormon, discussed this issue in chapter 4 of his book "Lehi In The Desert", describing how Laban fits a quite well-defined role in the culture of his time and place: that of the local military governor. But what were the records doing at Laban's house, and who was Laban anyway? ...


17

Latter-Day Saints agree and understand that the use of alcohol was permitted, and in some specific instances even formally encouraged in worship rituals, in ancient Judaism and Christianity. The revelation recorded in Section 89 of the Doctrine and Covenants explains that this is not an eternal principle, but a specific one for our day, given specifically ...


17

Short answer is that the Mormon God, Heavenly Father, is as supreme as it's going to get. On your misconceptions on the Mormon belief about God: Not creating matter - you are correct in your understanding You ask the learned doctors why they say the world was made out of nothing, and they will answer, “Doesn’t the Bible say he created the world?” And ...


17

No, the Book of Mormon has never been revised into a more modern English dialect. There have been various updates to the printing of the Book of Mormon over time to correct errors in the typesetting of earlier editions. The first edition was set and printed in haste, from a manuscript handwritten by Oliver Cowdery under Joseph Smith's dictation. Cowdery ...


16

LDS missionaries are instructed to not go swimming. Commonly, this idea is misunderstood to be for the entire Mormon population, which is untrue. That interpretation is "Mormonlore" which, I believe, spawns from a careless reading of D&C 61 (also see the section heading): 3 But verily I say unto you, that it is not needful for this whole company of ...


16

It's important to understand who 'they' refer to. From verse 23 we know the Lord is talking directly to the Sadducees, which say that there is no resurrection. They were asking a question to bait/trap the Lord in contradicting Moses, the lawgiver (see Deut 25:5-10). Remember this question is about what happens in the resurrection when the Sadducees don't ...


16

I will restate that the book Mormon Doctrine, written by Bruce R. McConkie, is not Mormon doctrine, nor ever has been. We [the First Presidency of the church] decided that Bruce R. McConkie’s book, 'Mormon Doctrine' recently published by Bookcraft Company, must not be re-published, as it is full of errors and misstatements, and it is most unfortunate that ...


15

Well, so the big hidden question here is "what comprises an LDS sunday service?". A related question covers some of this, so I'll just summarize. In your average "Sacrament meeting", you'll typically have: 1 who presides at the meeting 1 who conducts the meeting (may be the same as the one presiding) 1 who leads the music 1 who plays the piano/organ 2+ ...


15

This originates from a revelation given to Joseph Smith, recorded in Doctrine and Covenants 26, and is known as the law of common consent. Note that this is different from congregationalism in that in common consent, a decision is already made through prayer and by inspiration, and the decisions are not made by democratic voting, per-se. Those affected by ...


15

The "Evangelical" movement spreads across an incredibly wide range of beliefs, so it will be hard to nail this down, but a few things come to mind that ought to have broad acceptance and make at least some form of answer possible. For convenience in the rest of this answer, please treat the word "Evangelical" merely as broadly representing "Most Evangelicals"...


15

Some ambiguity in interpretation causes confusion. In addition to the passages you cited, I can think of one other in the Doctrine and Covenants with specific reference to meat: And whoso forbiddeth to abstain from meats, that man should not eat the same, is not ordained of God; For, behold, the beasts of the field and the fowls of the air, and that which ...


15

There is no official LDS doctrine on the subject, and the idea that everyone gets to choose where they want to end up makes no sense anyway. Obviously, some people get born into better circumstances than others, and with people being more likely to want to choose better circumstances than worse ones, clearly there are not enough "good births" to go around, ...


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