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2

I thought everyone asked themselves this question at one point and the answer is because it maximizes the manifestation of the good glory of God through our participation and enjoyment of that glory. It is similar to the question, "Why had God sent angels to help him do his will, when he could do it all by himself?". "Why did God ask Adam and ...


2

"Does an act being intrinsically evil ensure culpability?" No. A person forced to commit an intrinsic evil does not sin because sin requires consent of the will; "every sin is volutary" (St. Thomas Aquinas, Summa Theologica I-II q. 80 a. 1 co.). cf. Prümmer, O.P., Handbook of Moral Theology on human acts.


3

When false claims are made publicly by self-proclaimed Christians, who claim the false claim has a good outcome and hence is justifiable, it's often seen that the outcome is only viewed as being 'good' for themselves. I take it as understood that this question is limited to those who know their claim is false, and is not about those who sincerely think ...


0

[I feel that this is slightly hastily written, but it looks basically sound right now…] This answer probably violates some rules about what is acceptable as an answer on this site, but. . . The Bible tells us that we have the Knowledge of Good and Evil. (There are arguments that try to say that this is not. . . what it says, but I consider them all to be {...


2

I am surprised no one has brought up 2 Corinthians 7:9-11; I believe Paul gives you the answer there. 9 I now rejoice, not that you were made sorrowful, but that you were made sorrowful to the point of repentance; for you were made sorrowful according to the will of God, so that you might not suffer loss in anything through us. 10 For the sorrow that is ...


0

Good question. I think one common error we make as new Christians is assuming that discerning good from evil is as simple as waiting for a feeling of conviction from the Spirit. The Bible does not say this - in Scripture, the Spirit gives us a new heart with new desires, but learning to discern good from evil takes time. Our feelings can mislead us - ...


2

I've once heard a very nice sermon on this (can't remember which Church it was, but I believe Catholic), in a comparison with Judas and Peter. Both Judas and Peter betray Christ (Luke 22). Further more, both are sorry! Remember, Judas returns the money (Matthew 27). But Judas' sorrow, is an earthly one, that leaves us in a state of guilt, shame and blame. ...


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Maybe it is simple. Adam sinned all on his own, and brought death, mortality upon the whole human race. Romans 5 teaches this and also, when translated correctly, says we now, ever since Adam, sin because we are mortal. Paul teaches the problem is not so much that people sin, but that they are enslaved (beyond their will) to it. That is the power Jesus came ...


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