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Christian belief is that the presence of God brings life and joy. The closer you are to God, the more joyful you are, and the more "life" you have (life here not in the sense of mere existence, but in partaking of all the good things life has to offer). God is more present to those who are close followers of him, who therefore have much joy (as Paul ...


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Idioms are notoriously difficult to translate, since they are specific to the language of origin and may cause confusion when translated literally. One example is the expression “to miss the mark” (from the meaning of the Greek word hamartia in Luke 1:77; John 1:29; 1 John 3:4). It is worth noting what 1 John 3:4 says about sin: “Everyone who sins breaks ...


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The Strong's definition of the word says the following: ἁμαρτία, (ας, ἡ (from 2 aorist ἁμαρτεῖν, as ἀποτυχία from ἀποτύχειν), a failing to hit the mark (see ἁμαρτάνω. In Greek writings (from Aeschylus and Thucydides down). 1st, an error of the understanding (cf. Ackermann, Das Christl. im Plato, p. 59 Anm. 3 (English translation (S. R. Asbury, 1861), p. ...


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Comparing the sin of blasphemy with that of irreverence, McHugh, O.P. & Callan, O.P. write in Moral Theology: Unlike God, creatures are subject to imperfections, moral or physical, and thus it is not always erroneous or blasphemous to attribute imperfections to the Saints or sacred things.(a) If sacred persons or things are spoken ill of precisely ...


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Is it wrong to joke about holy things? The short answer is no, as long as the Sacred is maintained and no blasphemy is committed. Telling jokes about about the Scriptures, Jesus, Mary, the sacraments and so on, may possibly be permitted in Catholicism. But in all things the sacred must be maintained and blasphemy must be avoided. The basis for this ...


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