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How do superiors in a convent deal with the religious who are selective in the choice of food? Generally speaking religious superiors let the cooks choose what they desire to serve as long as it follows what is written down in the constitutions of a particular Religious Order. The rules for the various Religious Orders vary considerable. For example, ...


4

Assuming no sickness* or Church fasting and abstinence law impedes him from being able to eat the food, he commits a sin of ingratitude and gluttony by refusing it. There are five species of gluttony, which, following St. Gregory the Great, St. Thomas explains Summa Theologica II-II q. 148 a. 4 co., where one seeks "sumptuous" or "costly food" (pretiosos) "...


1

St. Benedict's Rule ch. 39 says that two options should be given: Of the Quantity of Food Making allowance for the infirmities of different persons, we believe that for the daily meal, both at the sixth and the ninth hour, two kinds of cooked food are sufficient at all meals; so that he who perchance cannot eat of one, may make his meal of the other. ...


0

Many retailers reuse smaller bills for till change, but there is still no real good reason to reject a damaged bill if it has a serial number on it. Few twenties are used for this purpose and definitely not any larger bills, in my experience. Any deceit to pass the legal bill is a matter of trying to bypass a retailers prefer to not have such bills. It would ...


1

From "Moral Theology" by Fr. Heribert Jone (a book that was recommended to me by a traditional Catholic priest), Section 215 on self-defense: "One may defend the life and possessions of others even as he may defend his own." So when and to what extent may I defend my own life? From the same book: "An unjust aggressor may be killed if the following ...


1

No, a damaged currency note or coin are still legal tender, if they are legible. In the US, the bill must be at least 50% complete, for obvious reasons. Passing along similar looking foreign currency or coin would be deceitful, though, such as giving change in the US with Canadian coins, which have lesser value.


3

Banks in Canada and I suppose the US and other developed countries will exchange bills that are damaged as long as they have one complete serial number because they are still considered legal tender. Thus if a bank note is damaged to this degree stores would be free to accept or reject the money in question. The Catholic Church would simply demand that ...


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Short answer: Yes. However, the reason why is not so simple. I found an answer by Germain Grisez which, it seems to me, is satisfactory: I am a woman, a nurse, and consider myself a feminist, but I accept the Church’s teaching that abortion is always wrong. Indeed, if the Church did not teach that, I would have a hard time believing anything it ...


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