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From Brittanica.com: Tyrant, Greek tyrannos, a cruel and oppressive ruler or, in ancient Greece, a ruler who seized power unconstitutionally or inherited such power. In the 10th and 9th centuries BCE, monarchy was the usual form of government in the Greek states. The aristocratic regimes that replaced monarchy were by the 7th century BCE themselves ...


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Numbers 16:48: And standing between the dead and the living, he [Aaron] prayed for the people, and the plague ceased.


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Can we say that Rebecca was twenty when she married Issac? The short answer is that we just do not know. The above source may be correct, but it may not. Young girls in biblical times married quite young in comparison to modern days: 13 or 14 was not uncommon. No sources seems to truly confirm an age of 20 as being true acceptable age Rebekah was married ...


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To put it much less formally than curiousdannii's excellent long and informative response. The defining difference is indeed the Incarnation, but this is not only "an event" but marks a foundational difference in both the content and how it is perceived. Between the two - many centuries of perceived "silence" - at least by the Jewish people of the day. ...


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There's a little bit of history to the titles Old Testament and New Testament that needs to be explained. We begin with the Greek word διαθήκη (diatheke) which has two major distinct sub-senses and cannot be translated with a single English word. a last will and testament a compact/contract/covenant, and in this sense it was used to translate בְּרִית (...


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To procreate is to reproduce. To procreate is a more formal way of saying "making babies". In Genesis 1:28 God told man "be fruitful and multiply". To multiply is to procreate. But is procreating "creating"? Suppose someone "creates" a loud noise because a heavy weight is dropped on their foot. In this instance they make something on the basis of how ...


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