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1

My own faith group practices complete congregational autonomy, so there is nobody who is authorized to speak for all of us, but I can tell you what has been taught and practiced in every congregation where I have attended. For starters, we take communion every Sunday, so we spend a lot of time reading and hearing the passages involved. The interpretation ...


2

The Lutheran understanding of sacrificial language in the Lord's Supper, is that to make a distinction between two types of sacrifices, namely: Propitiatory sacrifices These type of sacrifices bring about (or merit before God) the remission of sins, and require the shedding of blood (cf. Hebrews 9:22) Eucharistic sacrifices This is a thanks giving ...


9

This whole subject is dealt with, admirably and historically, by the Wikipedia article Lord's Supper in Reformed Theology and I thoroughly recommend it. The word ποιέω in Greek (see Strong 4160 and, therein, Thayer's comments in particular) covers a variety of concepts expressed in English by 'make' 'do' 'fashion' and (notably in this case) 'cause' and '...


5

The phrase in Luke 22:19, “do this in remembrance of me” is subject to different interpretations. I will provide a Lutheran answer. Literally in Luke 22:19, it is “do this into (Greek eis) my remembrance.” The question becomes, Who is to remember whom? The Greek allows for at least two options: (1) our remembering Christ (the dominant Protestant view), and (...


1

No, not exactly. While there are clearly some connections, we must be careful to not draw links that are unfounded and read-in that which is not intended. One passage describes Jesus' birth through Mary which occurred at a specific point in time. This is the important point from v14. Jesus 'dwelling' amongst us does align with the Phil passage. The Phil ref....


1

Have this mind among yourselves, which is yours in Christ Jesus, who, though he was in the form of God, did not count equality with God a thing to be grasped, but emptied himself, by taking the form of a servant, being born in the likeness of men. And being found in human form, he humbled himself by becoming obedient to the point of death, even death on a ...


0

A few more interpretations: A Molinist might say that God prepares all people by placing them in circumstances in which He knew their free choices would lead them to be saved, ie glory, and that this is a general statement rather than a reference to specific people in the past Some would say that this verse refers to the transition from the old covenant to ...


3

Most Cessationists that I know of of have a more nuanced understanding. They believe Jesus is speaking generally about unbelievers who think they have performed miracles but also may include an unbeliever who was in a ministry that actually may have performed real ones, such as Judas. For the fake miracles - these are to be expected and I suppose even many ...


4

The prophets (inspired preachers) spoke to groups, for general attitudes and ideas, making them accountable to the gospel through Spirit inspired authority and conviction. In most old commentaries and theology there are two aspects of prophecy 'predicting the future' or 'declaring the mind of God' generally. Both when referring to them as a gift, to be a ...


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