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Below are some bible commentaries from the early fathers that might be helpful: Christ has redeemed us from the curse of the law, being made a curse for us: for it is written, Cursed is every one that hangs on a tree: - Galatians 3:13 Every one who shall have hung on a tree.". I suppose, you endeavour to introduce a diversity of opinion, simply ...


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Clement of Rome and Polycarp are the earliest church fathers and are known as the Apostolic Fathers. After them came Irenaeus, Ignatius and Justin Martyr, the Ante-Nicene Fathers (pre 325 A.D.) Clement’s first letter to the Corinthians (circa 96 A.D.) makes reference to several canonical books including Genesis, Romans, Galatians, Ephesians, 1 Corinthians ...


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Here is the full text from Calvin's Commentary. I do not think any Presbyterian or Reformed would disagree. What things soever you shall bind. He now repeats the same words which he had formerly used, (Matthew 16:19,) but in a different sense; for there he intended to maintain their authority in doctrine, but here he appoints discipline, which is an ...


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Calvin writes a commentary which address this passage in some detail. He summarises it as follows: The substance of it is this: Whoever, after committing a crime, humbly confesses his fault, and entreats the Church to forgive him, is absolved not only by men, but by God himself; and, on the other hand, whoever treats with ridicule the reproofs and ...


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My own faith group, while not being Catholic, does not employ terms such as "Reformed Protestant" to describe itself, but I can speak to the question posed. With the following being understood, Once Matthew 16:19 and 18:18 are properly translated, we have clear teaching on how to act before God. It is not that we bind or loose and then God backs ...


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Different genealogy in St. Matthew and St. Luke? The reason for the differences between these two genealogies are multiple. St. Matthew's genealogy is that of St. Joseph St. Luke's, that of the Blessed Virgin. The genealogy of Christ according to the First Evangelist descends from Abraham through three series of fourteen members each; the first fourteen ...


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You ask "How do Unitarians refute the assertion that הָאָדוֹן (ha-adon) refers to Yahveh (God) in Mal. 3:1?" The question seems to hold the hidden assumption that Unitarians need to refute the Trinitarian position in order to be a valid belief. It also seems to hold the hidden assumption that Unitarians generally don't think that הָאָדוֹן (ha-adon) ...


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The gospel of Jesus, written by Luke, has a specific reason for giving the genealogy that he does. Notice where Luke suddenly (almost unexpectedly) places that genealogy. He plonks it right inbetween Jesus' baptism in the Jordan river and the temptations in the wilderness (Luke 3:23-38). Why would a genealogy appear there, in the narrative? Well, consider ...


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Actually I don't see the need to try and eliminate various interpretations. How about using some "reasoning" skills/logic to figure out what the Bible says are the messengers. Isaiah 40:3, "A voice is calling , Clear the way for the Lord in the wilderness; Make smooth in the desert a highway for our God." Mark 1:1-4, "The beginning ...


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Consider the phrase "before God" in question in the Greek: ενωπιον του θεου This phrase appears in the Greek Translation of the Old Testament in several places. Ecclesiastes 5:1-3 Judges 21:2 1 Guard your steps when you go to the house of God. Go near to listen rather than to offer the sacrifice of fools, who do not know that they do wrong. 2 Do ...


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A bit late to the party, but I just ran across this question and also an answer to it in Luther's sermons that I thought might be a helpful contribution. The flowing is an excerpt from Luther's commentary on Matthew 5:33-37: This text has been spun out with many glosses, and many a queer notion and error has been drawn from it, so that many great doctors ...


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Do Jehovah’s Witnesses acknowledge that the answer to the question “to what angel has he said...” is none? Yes contextually the answer is none. The context is that of the most high God bestowing his highest favor upon a subservient Son. This highest favor is contrasted with all other heavenly spirit creatures who are said not to come close to the measure of ...


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It is believed that Jesus, even assumed, that Jesus said this, implying he is "[Almighty] God", in turn, "The Father". However, on the other side of the spectrum, verses Revelation 1:8, 21:6 and 22:13 identifies not Jesus, but rather, The Father Himself. This is obvious when you check out the references. Alpha and omega are the first and last letters of ...


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