New answers tagged

3

Both God and Jesus can be understood to send the angel, because Jesus is at God's right-hand (Matthew 26:64) and is God's representative - God does things through Jesus. The NT generally, and Revelation in this case, repeatedly and clearly distinguishes between Jesus and God. Jesus is the 'Son of God', Jesus says 'My God, my God'. Jesus says 'Your God and my ...


2

The simple answer is based on the examples the text provides both in OT and NT usage of titles. Trying to prove anything by what title God has or is given to others including Christ is a curious exercise but accomplishes little of any value. King of Kings, Saviour, Lord, 'First and Last' is applied to both God and Jesus at different times and even other men ...


1

The question is akin to asking why belt loops don't also have zippers. In other words, the purpose of each book is not to duplicate what others have said, although there is some overlap, but to give the whole picture in their own way. As well, we can't assume that just because one book mentions ABC, but others do not, that ABC somehow is less important; it ...


1

The whole point of John's Gospel is to show its readers (and listeners) that Jesus is Christ, the Son of God (20:31), which goes back to Psalm 2 where God installs David to sonship i.e kingship, where David "ascends" to the throne, as it were, as a type of Christ. The means by which John aspires to prove Jesus' Christhood, are signs. Some pointing ...


4

There are many possibilities here. As @Dottard notes, 'non-trinitarian' encompasses a large number of views. IMO it is very difficult to maintain a position that Jesus isn't divine ("those who deny the divinity of Jesus in general") while also taking the Gospels seriously - the question rather is whether Jesus is God properly speaking or divine in ...


0

One thing to remember when translating is that the original Greek didn't use upper and lower case or punctuation, and that (like French and Spanish) nouns have gender, so the word for "it" is the same as the words for "she" and "he". (French has "il" and "elle" for "he" and "she", but no ...


0

There are several forms of non-trinitarianism, I can only comment on LDS doctrine. The Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-Day Saints teaches a Godhead comprised of three distinct persons (or beings since persons is an overloaded term in trinitiarian doctrine) working together as one. So for LDS, this scripture is simply interpreted as that - the Holy Spirit is ...


1

Any understanding must be true to two things, The text in focus All other scripture must be accommodated and not comprised or ignored. Any interpretation must maintain these two standards. While many translations have attempted to decipher this verse in isolation, we must include other texts before we draw any conclusions. Jesus is holy, without sin, and ...


0

Gideon's ephod is well, an ephod. A priestly garment worn under the breastplate. Some translations "liberally" label it as an idol which I don't think is the case. The bible doesn't specifically say what reason Gideon had in making the ephod. It could be one of a million reasons such as it being a remembrance to the victory they had. It could also ...


1

In the New Testament, we learn that Moses and Jacob did not see God in some abstract, intangible way. As John opens his gospel, he informs us that “no one has ever seen God,” but that Jesus, “the only God, who is at the Father’s side, he has made him known” (John 1:18). This echoes Jesus’ statement in John 6:46: “Not that anyone has seen the Father except he ...


0

Easy. I’d say He was in the form of God and took on the form of man. He was going back to the form of God in His current body. That form is greater, as His glory is no longer hidden and His body no longer corruptible. That is why scripture tells us we shall be like Him and see Him as He is at the resurrection of the dead.


4

What Moses saw is described and defined in Numbers 12:8. And he said, Hear now my words: If there be a prophet among you, I the LORD will make myself known unto him in a vision, and will speak unto him in a dream. My servant Moses is not so, who is faithful in all mine house. With him will I speak mouth to mouth, even apparently, and not in dark speeches; ...


0

Seeing God 'face-to-face' in an anthropomorphism; God doesn't actually have a face. Hence when reading that Moses met 'face-to-face', I read that as Moses being in God's Presence with completely open, transparent and honest conversation. Similarly, in not being able to see God's face, I read that as we cannot behold God in his holiness in our sinful nature. ...


0

The question should be placed in the context of the Law: 28 And one of the scribes came up and heard them disputing with one another, and seeing that he answered them well, asked him, “Which commandment is the most important of all?” 29 Jesus answered, “The most important is, ‘Hear, O Israel: The Lord our God, the Lord is one. 30 And you shall love the Lord ...


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The phrase "Bowels of mercies" is an ancient Greek phrase. It is explained here: https://biblehub.com/sermons/auth/davenant/bowels_of_mercies.htm


0

Yes I agree with your statement. We have been bought with a price that our life is not our own. Our bodies are his temple so he can walk through us the same way he walked through Jesus of Nazareth. We are to be transformed into His image, and to walk as he walked by the Holy Spirit. Jesus wanted everyone to know the truth and repent, Even his long-suffering ...


0

Some manuscripts have female pronouns and some have male. Some Catholic translations are based upon the ones with the female pronouns and thus see a foreshadowing of Mary (while still acknowledging Christ's roles). Protestant translations generally favor reading the male pronoun there and focus on Christ's role.


-1

There are two very important points that we should know that we can be sure of the answer. I. One of the most important principles of Biblical Interpretation is that scripture interprets scripture- we always have to compare what other passages say. When we do this it reveals great insight. Many Christians conflate the rapture [harpazo] with the second ...


2

Before we delve into what Malachi and Jude said, remember that two verses plucked out of the Bible can never establish whether a doctrine is right or wrong. These things have to be put into context and many other Scriptures must be consulted before a full picture emerges. Malachi carries on from where the prophets Haggai and Zechariah left off. The setting ...


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