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Teleotheis ("being made complete") refers to Jesus having accomplished what it is He purposed to come and accomplish: inasmuch as before He had done this His human mission would be imperfect and properly so-called, he is rightly called perfected by what He did when He did it. It doesn't imply Jesus was morally imperfect, or in any other sense.


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Calvin has this to say about Hebrews 5:9, using the word 'sanctified' for 'perfect' : Sanctified suits the passage better than "made perfect." The Greek word teleiotheis means both; but as he speaks here of the priesthood, he fitly and suitably mentions sanctification. And so Christ himself speaks in another place, "For their sakes I sanctify myself." (...


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The entire New Testament (sans Revelation because it is obviously metaphorical in many ways) is considered to be fully historical. The Old Testament is read historically from Exodus and onwards, besides maybe Job or Tobit. The Church has no official teachings on the historicity of Genesis, but the past three popes and many of the saints (such as Aquinas and ...


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The Catholic Church Magisterium has not committed to reading the first few chapters of Genesis (from Adam to Noah, at least) as historical / scientific account. Instead, both the Catholic Church and a growing segment of Protestants and Evangelicals, emphasize that scientific truth and the theological truth are compatible with each other. What has to be ...


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The most important key in resolving an apparent conflicting passage in Scripture is by comparing it with how the same Holy Spirit guiding the early Christians throughout time interpreting the passage being disputed. If throughout time from the earliest moment a dispute was brought in attention and discussed down to the modern time show converging thoughts or ...


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Dr. Steven Anderson wrote his Ph.D. dissertation on Darius the Mede. His conclusion that Darius the Mede is Cyaxares II mainly derived from Xenophon’s book Cyropaedia. Xenophon was a student of Socrates, a soldier and a historian. Dr. Anderson believes that Cyrus had a coregency with Darius the Mede (Cyaxares II) his father-in-law then became sole king on ...


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There does not seem to be one view. It is taken either as having a “temporal” significance or an “eschatological” one by Amillenials. The Non-Millenarian View [1] This takes us to the third point, and that is the meaning of the phrase “until the full number of the Gentiles has come in” (v. 25). Most commentators agree that Paul’s use of “until”...


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Not only wasn't John the Baptist the prophet (i.e., Messiah), neither was he a prophet in the OT or NT sense. His purpose was to preach repentance, to call people to righteousness, and thus to prepare hearts for the prophet coming after him.


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"Behold" is a wonderful English word but unfortunately rarely used in common speech today. It means to "see" in the sense of understand. We might say today that someone who "beholds" in the Greek sense is someone who "gets it". So, to behold the Son would mean to appreciate who He is, to see Jesus with spiritual eyes. There are many who know an abundance of ...


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Eph 1:12 Apostle Paul says that the Believer is sealed with the holy spirit of promise. In Acts 1, Jesus told the disciples that they would receive the Holy Ghost with power. Power to witness. In Jonn 20:22, when Jesus breathed on the disciples they received the seal of eternal life now that Jesus had died for their sins. On the day of Pentecost they would ...


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This is from the SDA perspective. We believe in righteousness by faith. The Bible clearly teaches that salvation is NOT reached by works, as our works are as filthy rags: But we are all as an unclean thing, and all our righteousnesses are as filthy rags; and we all do fade as a leaf; and our iniquities, like the wind, have taken us away. Isaiah ...


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To answer the question "How should we interpret this verse?": This question opens the rather large kettle of fish of soteriology when it comes to the suggestion that our entire lives are predestined before we are born. As you may have seen from other answers, some - such as Calvinists - happily affirm that yes, God predestines and controls every aspect of ...


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This chapter is primarily answering questions asked of Paul by the church in Corinth. Now concerning the matters about which you wrote:... 1 Cor 7:1 Some of those questions had to do with the state of marriage once the new birth enters in to the equation; Verses 1-6 treat the matter of conjugal responsibilities within an existing marriage (permanent ...


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What does not appear to be taken into your question is the age of consent. That is a strict belief in the Baptist Denomination. While a child is under the age of consent they are covered by the Grace of God (or in other words they are not judged by their not accepting Jesus as their Savior. They are accepted as were Adam and Eve prior to the fall). Later ...


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Moses told the people to expect in the future an authoritative, law giving prophet of at least equal stature to himself. No other prophet that followed Moses was regarded as important as Moses by the Jewish people. Thus this expected prophet would stand out. 15 “The Lord your God will raise up for you a prophet like me from among your own brothers. You ...


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If you start with the attributes of God, that He is omnipotent, omnipresent and omniscient, then it follows that he is sovereign over all things - the universe, the earth and individuals. It is often hard for humans to give up their autonomy and acknowledge that God is in charge. Until we do, we worship a god of our own creation. These verses definitely ...


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How are the words of Mary in Luke 1:34 incontrovertible proof of her perpetual virginity? Luke1:34 is not "incontrovertible" proof of Her perpetual virgininty. Rather, it is an incontrovertible proof that the Blessed Virgin Mary had already decided in Her immaculate heart to offer Her "body & blood" even Her precious virginity to fulfill the Isaiah ...


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