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And he went and lived in a city called Nazareth, so that what was spoken by the prophets might be fulfilled, that he would be called a Nazarene. (Matthew 2:23) [ESV] In his book, Barney Kasdan states Matthew is using a midrash, which is "an interpretive act, seeking the answers to religious questions (both practical and theological) by plumbing the meaning ...


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According to Catholicism, why did Jesus not name the rich man in the story of Lazarus and the rich man? There is no reason in particular, according to the Church, why Our Lord did not name the rich man in the parable about the rich man and Lazarus. Or is there? It is interesting to note that neither Jesus nor any of the popes (as the Vicars of Christ) ...


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Mark 5:1-14 KJV 1 And they came over unto the other side of the sea, into the country of the Gadarenes. 2 And when he was come out of the ship, immediately there met him out of the tombs a man with an unclean spirit, 3 Who had his dwelling among the tombs; and no man could bind him, no, not with chains: 4 Because that he had been often bound with fetters and ...


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Famed 4th century preacher John Chrysostom gives the best answer, in my view. He says the story illustrates the full malice of the demons and also the restraint that God placed on them to keep them from destroying the possessed man in the same way as they did the pigs. After reading the story of the demoniac and the swine, he says: Thus do Demons govern; ...


2

I've heard Hebrews 6:6 explained by Dr. David L. Allen. He has written extensively on Atonement. Summarizing points below: To the Calvinist Hebrews 6:6 refers to the false convert; to the Arminian it’s to the apostate. Dr. Allens argues it is neither. Context: The end of Hebrews 5 defines it being directed to believers in infancy, and Hebrews 6 starts with ...


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Hebrews 10:26 is not talking about Christians that can lose their salvation. This is a Rhetorical Passage. The fact is the author uses the word if; meaning if this should happen, Christian deliberately sinning after receiving the knowledge of the truth (that Jesus is the only and perfect sacrifice for sin), if Christian should reject this truth, there will ...


4

When you start by claiming, “Within Protestantism there is no universal definition of theology or how to understand the Bible…” that risks distortion of the facts. Good though the question is, it needs to be pointed out at the outset that the definition of theology is not a problem, let alone a question, among Protestants. All Protestants are agreed that ...


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As far as I know, what you are asking for does not exist. There is no epistemology that Protestants use to declare a doctrine authoritative or heretical to the degree that you ask. All possible methods I can think of have been excluded unless you simply haven’t chosen an answer yet that you do agree with.


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First of all the demons knew who Jesus was. The earliest account is from the Gospel of Mark (Mark 5:1-20), in which Jesus goes across the sea into the "region of the Gerasenes".[4] There, a man "possessed by a demon" comes from the caves to meet him. People had tried to tie him down but he was too strong to be bound, even with chains for he would always ...


3

Most lay Protestants today think Sola Scriptura to mean Bible only, no tradition at all. But the original reformers (including Luther & Calvin) have always included a measure of apostolic tradition in their Sola Scriptura principle. The original reformers carefully stayed away from the highly individualistic, divorced from any tradition approach that ...


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There is nothing in John 13:5 to exclude Judas from the foot washing. (This was part-way through the meal, v2.) Further, it is when the foot washing was complete (v21) that Jesus begins to tell the disciples some final truths, including that one of them was about to betray the Messiah. Therefore, I see no need to re-arrange the order of the events as ...


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Among the commandment of the Law is against adultery. Jesus says that you heard that it was said: you must not commit adultery, for he was quoting from the law. He continues, but I say to you that everyone who keeps on looking at a woman so as to have a passion for her has already committed adultery with her in his heart. (Matthew 5:27, 28). We read that ...


3

The difference between Protestants and Catholics here all starts with the Catholic view that Mary died a virgin. But some scriptures talk of Jesus's brothers, such as Matthew 12:47 and Mark 6:3. So some Catholics say that brothers here means cousins. Protestants reply that there is a specific Greek word for cousins which would have been more appropriate ...


1

Let's look at the narrow context: Adultery 27 “You have heard that it was said, ‘You shall not commit adultery.’ 28 But I tell you that anyone who looks at a woman lustfully has already committed adultery with her in his heart. 29 If your right eye causes you to stumble, gouge it out and throw it away. It is better for you to lose one part of ...


2

It was common at that time for several families to travel together, this was a necessity; since there were many highwaymen. And the smaller children were probably left in the care of a trusted member of the family; or a trusted friend. Since it was normal for all families in that era to watch over all children. This would have been quite normal. As a child ...


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If we accept the bible teaching that Mary/Joseph had children, then they would have been younger than Jesus. In the question, the age of Jesus was 12. The oldest sibling was probably no older than 10 at that time. Is not this the carpenter, the son of Mary, the brother of James, and Joses, and of Juda, and Simon? and are not his sisters here with us? ...


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Other than the names already mentioned, the Early Church called itself Catholic. The first written evidence of it is in a letter from St Ignatius of Antioch at around 100 AD. It is assumed the name was popular from the beginning though. It was used to differentiate itself from the "ethnic" religion of Israel (Judaism), because catholic means universal in ...


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Yes, they were evil as explained in Book of Enoch This results in the creation of the Nephilim (Genesis) or Anakim/Anak (Giants) as they are described in the book: And they became pregnant, and they bare great giants, whose height was three hundred ells:[70] Who consumed all the acquisitions of men. And when men could no longer sustain them, the ...


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Whilst I won't go into detail, the simple answer is yes. That's why God had to wipe all of humanity (excluding Noah and his family) with a flood and exterminate certain Canaanite tribes/clans, who the Nephilim dwelt amongst. Something really, really bad had to be going on. (Find it quite ironic that the initial poster's first name is Canaan).


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The Parallels are extensive. -the philosophical point of the play is the question do the laws of the polis come from man's government or from the god's? King Pentheus or Olympus. So too Jesus confronts Paul using the law to persecute Christians with the author of the law itself. -Is the ecstasy of the worshipers Divine? Are they filled with their God? or ...


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@Susan, Your tying Genesis with John is exactly on the money. When GOD first did this in Genesis : And the Lord God formed man of the dust of the ground, and breathed into his nostrils the >breath of life; and man became a living being. (Genesis 2:7, NKJV) He was breathing nepesh (this is the exact Hebrew work - our closest translation of this word ...


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