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The following points detailed in this Study Guide seem to answer your questions, and I just wish to highlight some of them, prefacing them with this simple point. Assurance of God’s grace and salvation comes after the event. God graciously saves an individual. Thereafter, the person becomes aware of that transforming grace. Some of the problems you raise ...


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Speaking as a Calvinist, according to Calvinism, if you doubt your election then you should pray for forgiveness again and go back to the beginning again of repenting and believing on Christ for salvation. Believing you are elect is a reflective consequence of faith in Christ. It is not our business to worry about whether we are elect, our business is to ...


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A few verses come to mind: Some are “objects of his wrath - prepared for destruction” (Rom 9:22) God “hardens whom he wants” (Rom 9:18) No one comes to Christ “unless the Father … draws them” (John 6:44) This contrasts with God “wants all people to be saved” (1 Tim 2:4) God gave his son, so that “whoever believes” will not perish (John ...


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Just because a person is a long time church member does not mean they belong to Christ Jesus or that they have put their faith and trust in Him. There are many people who say they are Christians but who have never experienced the new birth. Forgetting about Calvin for one moment, born-again Christians look to Christ Jesus and believe in this promise in ...


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First thing we need to establish is what the Divine Plan is. Predestination is certainly part of it but it also has to do with redemption and salvation. “In him [Christ Jesus] we have redemption through his blood, the forgiveness of sins” (Ephesians 1:7). Here is a brief Reformed Protestant view: Salvation is entirely the work of God and since the plan of ...


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Dr. Leighton Flowers (a former 5-Point Calvinist) speaks about this often. Check out his writings and podcasts if you're interested in more information or to hear from former Calvinists. He and his guests often speak about pre/post views on Romans 9, Ephesians 1, and John 6. I've included an example of his prior/post interpretations of Matthew 22:1-14. ...


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I'm not entirely sure what the precise question is here, but I can offer some guidance that might clear it up for you. It appears you are conflating "Total" depravity with "Utter" depravity. The depravity of man is not such that he always does the most morally reprehensible thing imaginable, his nature is not corrupted to the uttermost; rather every action ...


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In Matthew 5, Jesus tells the parable of the Talents: 14 “For it will be like a man going on a journey, who called his servants[c] and entrusted to them his property. 15 To one he gave five talents,[d] to another two, to another one, to each according to his ability. Then he went away. 16 He who had received the five talents went at once and ...


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You ask,"Why would a reprobate man experience joy upon hearing the gospel"? When the children of Israel saw God's deliverance at the crossing of the Red Sea their minds were mightily impressed. They thought God is with us we will sing to Him. Exodus 15v1. . Was this spiritual rejoicing at being born again or intellectual and emotional rejoicing at not being ...


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It is true that the Jews ultimately did not accept the apocryphal books you listed in their canon, in a gradual process over several centuries at least spanning 1st century BC and 1st century AD. There was no definitive answer, but a lot of pointers showing the development, shown in the BIBLE CANON article of the 1906 Jewish Encyclopedia. Especially after ...


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Theological determinism is as fatal to human reason and faith as Natural determinism, if all future events are totally determined by past states of affairs (see Plantinga: “...Where the Problem Really Lies”) There is a parallel distinction between cause-effect and ground-consequent (Re: C. S. Lewis). The former applies to determinism and the latter to ...


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