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Reformed Christians believe that fruit ("good works") are an inevitable consequence of faith. One consequence of faith is salvation. The other, fruit. There is no such thing as a "believer" that does not bear fruit. The statement is redundant, as stated by Jesus in verse 5 of the same passage: he who abides in Me and I in him, he bears much fruit The ...


3

The whole vine analogy loses a lot when separated by centuries of non-agricultural life. This is not primarily a scientific description of salvation but a spiritual description of the kingdom of heaven. A vine has branches that bud and bear not just leaves but fruit also and it has other branches that bear leaves only. These are colloquially called '...


1

There are understood to be two different ways of being "in the vine," and only one is a reference to true salvation. The illustration in question clearly describes (in addition to branches which are fully a living part of the tree) branches which are outwardly, visibly attached to the tree, but which do not inwardly share in the life of the tree. They're ...


1

When Scripture talks of gaining salvation "by works" as opposed to "by faith" what I think it is really driving at is the distinction between gaining salvation as a free gift and earning salvation. When you exercised faith in Christ you were saved, but you didn't earn salvation by believing. Suppose Bill Gates says to me "Come knock on my door tomorrow ...


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Just the idea of remaining should clarify that a person can be once there on the vine but be pruned off, because they themselves rejected what they formerly had and didn't produce fruit. Matthew 7:22-23 seems to say clearly that even people who call Jesus Lord Lord, and who cast out demons in his name and do miracles in his name are not recognized as ...


5

Within that sentence are two statements. The first is that the Father (who is the vine-dresser) will take away the branch that does not bear fruit. The second is that the Father will prune the branch that does bear fruit so that it may bear more fruit. If this parable was the only place in the New Testament to address the issue of eternal security, then ...


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