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50

The context of Matthew is adultery--relations with a woman who is not your wife. The context of Proverbs is marriage--relations with the woman who is your wife. The difference is quite substantial. “You have heard that it was said, ‘You shall not commit adultery.’ 28 But I say to you that everyone who looks at a woman with lustful intent has already ...


32

This is a major point of Romans 6. After arguing that the coming of the law increased the number of trespasses, and that subsequently "grace abounded all the more," Paul warns those who might twist his words: 6:1 What shall we say then? Are we to continue in sin that grace may abound? 2 By no means! How can we who died to sin still live in it? 6:15 ...


21

In the Mosaic Law, God strictly forbids this: A woman shall not wear man’s clothing, nor shall a man put on a woman’s clothing; for whoever does these things is an abomination to the Lord your God. Deuteronomy 22:5 NASB It must be stated, however, that this was specifically in the Mosaic Law, so it cannot necessarily be extended outside of the Jewish ...


18

It's not so much that sandals or slippers are considered to be unholy, it's that they're dirty, and removing them is a sign of respect similar to removing one's hat when entering a building, or perhaps removing a nose ring when entering a strict parent's house. From the United church of God's article on the subject: Taking off your sandals was like the ...


18

Part of the confusion as modern readers is that we miss what the Pharisees meant when they referenced "the Law." For the Pharisees, "the Law" had two parts. There was the "Written Law" (תורה שבכתב), and there was the "Oral Law" (תורה שבעל פה), which they claimed was also given to Moses at Mt. Sinai. You can read more about this in the Mishnah. The Old ...


18

Here is what Aquinas actually wrote: In each kind of thing the worst corruption is the corruption of the principle on which other things depend. Now the principles of reason are the things in accord in nature… and therefore, to act against what is determined by nature, is most serious and base. Therefore since in the sins against nature man transgress ...


17

God cannot sin, not because He lacks the free will to do so, but because it would be inconsistent with His character and His nature. From http://www.godandscience.org/apologetics/rock.html The word "omnipotent" is never used in the Bible, but has been inferred primarily by one of God's Hebrew titles, "Shadday," which is most often translated "...


17

Protestants basically fall into three main camps, claiming that the unpardonable sin is: attributing the works of the Holy Spirit to the devil; or, refusal to repent even to the end of one's life; or, hatefully and willfully slandering the Holy Spirit's testimony of Christ. Within (3), there are three views regarding who can commit the sin: 3a) only ...


17

"Jealousy" in colloquial English, means either (1) indignation in response to infidelity, or (2) covetousness of the belongings of others. We can immediately eliminate the second case, because God cannot be covetous; everything is his. (Psalm 50:12) “If I were hungry I would not tell you, for the world is Mine, and all it contains." This jealousy that is ...


15

When you look at Jesus' command in light of the whole law, and other instances where He said similar things (such as "be ye as perfect as your father in heaven"), you realize that while this is a command, it's really just a repetition of all the previous commands given by God over thousands of years. Jesus' command is just a reaffirmation of what God has ...


15

Some Protestant groups, like those represented by the conservative R.C. Sproul Jr and the Acton Institute, believe that even if the government does nothing but evil, one nonetheless is obligated to pay taxes to support it, because what the government does is not the responsibility of the people supporting it but the fault of the government itself. This is ...


15

The Church's current teaching points to the sacrament itself overcoming any weakness of an individual. If a priest intends to send babies to hell while he is baptizing them, are those infants deprived of regeneration, according to Catholicism? No. The presumption made that a priest intends to send babies to hell is based on absurdity (addressed ...


14

In the sermon of the mount, Jesus teaches about the sixth through tenth commandments, deepening their meaning. For example, "Don't kill" he expands to "Don't have unresolved anger or conflict". "Don't commit adultery" becomes "Don't lust". For "Don't bear false witness", Jesus says (not quoting one of the ten commandments directly, but a related passage ...


14

The Old Testament is clear that only unintentional sins can be atoned for: One and the same law applies to everyone who sins unintentionally, whether a native- born Israelite or a foreigner residing among you. “‘But anyone who sins defiantly, whether native- born or foreigner, blasphemes the Lord and must be cut off from the people of Israel. (Numbers ...


14

God cannot sin, because sin is defined in relation to who God is and what He does. Anything God does cannot be sin, simply because God did it. Sin is a failure to live up to God's standard.


14

I will begin by observing that the answer to this question is a logical and philosophical one, hence it does not depend on a particular religion or denomination. It is human nature itself that demands utmost respect for all human beings, and hence all people—regardless of religion—are obligated to work for the end to direct abortion in all cases. I will, ...


14

The short answer is “no.” First of all, the Church is not in the habit of listing all possible sinful behavior. The vast majority of possible behaviors are left to the prudent judgment of the faithful: only when certain things are particularly grave violations of the natural law does the Church speak out about them. (See the Catechism of the Catholic Church ...


14

Sin has consequences! "Sin has two consequences, or punishments (CCC 1472). The first is eternal punishment, in which the soul loses heaven and is confined to an eternity in hell. This punishment is remitted through the forgiveness of sins. The second is temporal punishment, in which a person must expiate, or make reparation for his sins. This temporal ...


13

First, beware of false premises. Food provides sustenance to the body. It contains calories and vital nutrients. Drugs do not, so it would be a mistake to equate them with food. In fact, drugs tend to have the opposite effect from food: instead of nourishing the body, they harm it. Second, simply because "everything created by God is good," that does not ...


13

Mason Wheeler's answer covers a lot of ground. There are some other approaches to this that are also worth considering though. One is to look at "the law of the land" - in many countries, many drugs are illegal and therefore the Bible passages that urge us to obey and respect the laws of our countries therefore apply to drug use/misuse as well. (Example ...


13

You must confess all mortal sins that you're aware of and any venial sins you feel compelled to confess. You are not absolved of any mortal sins you withhold, and intentionally withholding mortal sins not only invalidates the whole confession, but is a mortal sin itself. (catholic.com) And, if left in a state of mortal sin, you're expected not to receiving ...


12

Jesus is here asking the Pharisees a rhetorical question, that is - what would be easier for him to say if he was not God. The answer is simple - it is easier for a mere man to say "Your sins are forgiven", because there is no outward immediate manifestation. It is much more difficult to say "Stand up and walk", because it would be readily apparent that ...


12

First things first, there are no 'denominations' within Orthodoxy. The Orthodox believe in one, holy, catholic, and apostolic Church (as professed by the Nicene Creed), and they believe that the Orthodox Church is it. Therefore it would be inappropriate to speak of a doctrinal position of the Russian Orthodox that is not also true of other Orthodox. While ...


12

God destroyed Sodom and Gomorrah because of their grievous sins along with other towns in the plain of the Jordan, except Zoar. Genesis 18:20-21 (NIV) Then the Lord said, “The outcry against Sodom and Gomorrah is so great and their sin so grievous that I will go down and see if what they have done is as bad as the outcry that has reached me. If not, I ...


12

Yes, if the candidate was voted for because they were pro-abortion Pope Benedict XVI (formerly Cardinal Joseph Ratzinger) succinctly summed up the Catholic Church's teachings in the memorandum "Worthiness to Receive Holy Communion: General Principles": A Catholic would be guilty of formal cooperation in evil, and so unworthy to present himself for Holy ...


11

A successful marriage relationship will need a full measure of agape love. Here's how Paul defines it with particularly relevant words bolded: Love is patient and kind; love does not envy or boast; it is not arrogant or rude. It does not insist on its own way; it is not irritable or resentful; it does not rejoice at wrongdoing, but rejoices with the ...


11

The most authoritative answers can be found in Article 8: Sin of the Catechism of the Catholic Church. It is carefully worded and addresses the questions asked. The following is an attempt at a supplement. Other sources include the Catholic Encyclopedia and the Baltimore Catechism. This is about actual sin (as in "act-ual", from Latin actus) having to do ...


11

I believe that this Bible verse confirms that Jesus took on the sins of mankind. John 1:29 ESV The next day he saw Jesus coming toward him, and said, “Behold, the Lamb of God, who takes away the sin of the world!


11

The distinction between mortal and venial sins is only very roughly that "venial sins are kind of bad and mortal sins are really bad". More accurately one could say that all sins adversely affect one's relationship to God; but venial sins, because they don't involve a complete turning away from God, "merely" damage the relationship, while mortal sins destroy ...


11

Summary: Rahab is widely praised for protecting the Hebrew spies, despite her betrayal of her countrymen, but opinion among both church fathers and modern commentators is divided with respect to her false report. Hiding the spies Church fathers such as Gregory of Elvira and Cassiodorus praise Rahab's protection of the spies and see in her an image of the ...


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