New answers tagged

2

I will give a Lutheran response. There are various points of view among Lutheran theologians on being filled or “baptized in the Holy Spirit." The dominant view is that the function of being “baptized in the Holy Spirit” is an ongoing reality of the Christian life that first occurs at conversion. Still other Lutheran theologians have highlighted the ...


4

And ye shall seek me, and find me, when ye shall search for me with all your heart. [Jeremiah 29:13 KJV] John Calvin says the following on the above text : This then is the reason why the Prophet employs many words on this subject. By the word seek, he means prayers and supplications, as mentioned in the last verse. And Christ also, exhorting his disciples ...


2

A common theme emerges from these Protestant / Evangelical articles on "What Does it Mean to Seek God" from 4 well known sources: Christianity.com, Desiring God, gotquestions.org, Crosswalk. My answer is based on those articles, primarily using John Piper's (Reformed) 2009 article What Does It Mean to Seek the Lord? WHAT are we seeking? God's ...


1

My own faith group practices complete congregational autonomy, so there is nobody who is authorized to speak for all of us, but I can tell you what has been taught and practiced in every congregation where I have attended. For starters, we take communion every Sunday, so we spend a lot of time reading and hearing the passages involved. The interpretation ...


2

The Lutheran understanding of sacrificial language in the Lord's Supper, is that to make a distinction between two types of sacrifices, namely: Propitiatory sacrifices These type of sacrifices bring about (or merit before God) the remission of sins, and require the shedding of blood (cf. Hebrews 9:22) Eucharistic sacrifices This is a thanks giving ...


9

This whole subject is dealt with, admirably and historically, by the Wikipedia article Lord's Supper in Reformed Theology and I thoroughly recommend it. The word ποιέω in Greek (see Strong 4160 and, therein, Thayer's comments in particular) covers a variety of concepts expressed in English by 'make' 'do' 'fashion' and (notably in this case) 'cause' and '...


5

The phrase in Luke 22:19, “do this in remembrance of me” is subject to different interpretations. I will provide a Lutheran answer. Literally in Luke 22:19, it is “do this into (Greek eis) my remembrance.” The question becomes, Who is to remember whom? The Greek allows for at least two options: (1) our remembering Christ (the dominant Protestant view), and (...


1

God is a personification of reality. Actually, a hyper-reality. Jesus "existed" as a human ideal. The best & noble qualities of a purified & selfless Man. Knowledge gathered & accumulated thru time across cultures. Jesus is in effect, the best a man can be. You don't read the Old testament absolutely literally. Don't do the same to the ...


0

God is eternal and does not change. He just is. He can see the beginning to the end. He prepared before the foundation of the earth, before any human was created, to send his Son as a human to die for our sin. Because He knew we would fall. God's dealing with us throughout history has changed, but the plan all along was was for Him to redeem humanity. He is ...


3

God's personality didn't change. How He interacted with humanity changed. It's important to understand that when God makes agreements with humans, He will always adhere to them. He may not be happy about them, but he'll stick to the terms of the agreement he made, because God is perfectly truthful and perfectly faithful. These agreements are called Covenants,...


7

Answering from Catholic and traditional Protestant (5 solas) perspective (both adhere to the Holy Trinity and the Chalcedonian Creed): The Chalcedonian Creed emphasised that the union of the dual nature is analogous to the union of the soul and the human body, so that the two remained distinct but cooperates seamlesly so that there is one only hypostasis ...


Top 50 recent answers are included