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John 1:48 does not imply bilocation any more than any other prophet's visions indicate bilocation. For example: Daniel had dreams/visions about events at the Ulai canal (Dan 8) Ezekiel had visions about heaven and the exiles in Jerusalem John saw things about heaven as well Paul records a vision about the third heaven (2 Cor 12:1-6) Samuel records many ...


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It’s most peculiar to me that this question is asked of Bible believers. The Bible says that those who have passed on from this life are dead in Christ. “For the Lord himself shall descend from heaven with a shout, with the voice of the archangel, and with the trump of God: and the dead in Christ shall rise first:” ‭‭1 Thessalonians‬ ‭4:16‬ ‭ ...


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I'd like to start by pointing out a small error. 'Protestant' is a branch of Christianity, so it's not grammatically correct to talk about 'Protestant and Christian' as two different things. You might say 'Protestant and other Christian...' (The other main branches are Catholic and Orthodox.) Now to the main question. Protestants do not in general believe ...


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I speak as a Baptist. We believe in sola scriptura, namely all doctrines that are required to be believed are contained in the Bible, and any doctrine not found in the Bible is suspect. To be more precise: “The whole counsel of God, concerning all things necessary for his own glory, man’s salvation, faith, and life, is either expressly set down in ...


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I am unaware of any undisputed evidence of bilocation. It is not described in the Bible as far as I can tell. The closest we see are two examples as listed below. Philip in Acts 8:39, 40 where the Spirit "snatched him away) and he appeared suddenly in a different location. The prophet Elijah as mentioned in 1 Kings 18:12. However, I am not sure that ...


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That such stories emanate from the Catholic Church would lead any intelligent person to form an opinion about the Catholic Church, one way or another way. It is true that, as far as I can find, no valid, Protestant spokesperson has claimed to be able to be in two places (on earth) at the same time. Nor did any Old Testament prophet. Nor did any Apostle. ...


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According to Wikipedia, bilocation does not appear to be restricted to only pious people within the Catholic Church: The concept of bilocation has appeared in early Greek philosophy, shamanism, paganism, folklore, occultism, magic, the paranormal, Hinduism (as one of the siddhis), spiritualism, Theosophy, the New Age and mysticism in general, as well as ...


3

Charismatic Renewal not a Catholic movement See The Catechism of the Crisis in the Church ch. 9 "The Sacraments" §87: What is the rite known as “the baptism in the Spirit”? The rite of “baptism in the Spirit”301 was originally the distinctive mark of a Protestant sect called the Pentecostalists. It is a laying on of hands for the purpose of giving a ...


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According to the Bible: “What is conceived in her is from the Holy Spirit” (Matthew 1:20). The Virgin Mary “was found to be with child through the Holy Spirit” (Matthew 1:18). “God sent His Son, born of a woman” (Galatians 4:4). That’s what Protestants believe transpired. We don’t speculate; we just believe what the Bible says. If the Bible ...


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A major difference between the Eastern Orthodox churches and the Baptists (since you mention them in particular) is the view of the church. Dr B. H. Carroll, the first president of Southwest Baptist Theological Seminary, wrote a paper on "Distinctive Baptist Principles", which describes the (Christian) church as a particular congregation and not an ...


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There is an Old Testament principle that applies in the case of defending ones property: “If a thief is caught breaking in at night and is struck a fatal blow, the defender is not guilty of bloodshed; but if it happens after sunrise, the defender is guilty of bloodshed” (Exodus 22:2–3). In the case of a night-time attack, the Law granted the homeowner the ...


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Eze 18 doesn't contradict the Protestant doctrine simul justus et peccator because I believe Protestants interpret this passage as relevant ONLY during the time of Ezekiel, when the new covenant has not yet come. So the operative covenant here is still the Mosaic law. The new heart has just been promised, but because it will not arrive for a few hundreds ...


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I'm adding another answer because I cannot find 3 critical elements that could have explained further the Protestants' insistence of "sola scriptura". Firstly, it's never about JUST personal interpretation. I think the reformers assumed and many evangelicals today believe that the sola scriptura doctrine is to be practiced together with the doctrine of ...


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