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Eusebius of Caesarea (before 311) wrote in Demonstratio Evengelica, Book X, that "the Lamb of God...suffered a penalty He did not owe".


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On an official German protestant website exactly this question was answered with the following arguments (loosely summarized in English by me): Protestants do not have a hierarchy of the deceased. None of us is so good that they are immediately by the side of God after they have died; we all will need God's forgiveness at judgement day. On the upside, we ...


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For those denominations that take the Bible fairly literally, everyone that has ever died (with one notable exception) is still dead and buried and awaiting resurrection. For the living know that they will die; But the dead know nothing, … — Ecclesiastes 9:5 No one has ascended to heaven but He who came down from heaven, … — John 3:13 Men and brethren, ...


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The answer is YES, God is capable of human emotions. The common topic in theology for this question is the discussion on 2 contrasting attributes of God: passibility vs. impassibility. This answer borrows heavily from the two GotQuestions.org articles linked above. Let's consider the data: As you mention, Scriptures presents God in emotional terms, ...


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There are two kinds of 'free will' which philosophers speak about: liberty of spontaneity, and liberty of indifference. Liberty of spontaneity means we are free to act according to our desires, whereas liberty of indifference means we are free to choose our desires. So, for example, liberty of spontaneity means I like cheese and I can eat it whenever I want. ...


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The firstborn of one's mother is referred to in the Bible as one who "opens the womb" of his mother. God told Moses to consecrate every firstborn male to Him (Exodus 13:1-2). The first blessing mentioned in the Bible was from God to both Adam and Eve, whom He created (Genesis 1:28). The second blessing from God was upon Noah and his three sons (...


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Despite the best answer having been chosen, I feel constrained to add three points in the Bible itself, addressed to Christians. First of all, Protestantism is not a free-for-all, with each Protestant free to do his or her own thing, based on his or her own conclusions about the 'correct' interpretation of any Bible verses. Tragically, this is what it seems ...


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Decades ago, when I was a new Christian, I read Joyce Huggett’s book, ‘Listening to God’ and thought it really good. I have since thrown it out, along with other literature that is basically proposing a system of ‘climbing up to’ or ‘attaining special knowledge and experience of God’ that is not the way the Bible says. First, it might be useful for anyone ...


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I am unaware of any official objections published by a Protestant denomination, but as a result of looking into Ignatian Spirituality, a couple of things give me cause for concern. Although the objectives of the spiritual exercises are praiseworthy, an examination of the history behind this revival is useful. Ignatius of Loyola was a 16th-century Spanish ...


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