New answers tagged

2

You are describing a system in which authority is transferred from person to person. In the Bible, authority comes from God. All those that are faithful in submitting to God's will have authority to represent Him to some degree, although I do believe that God also puts people into positions. But just because, for example, Nebuchadnezzar was put into a ...


1

Firstly, lets acknowledge that a lot of Protestants do practice apostolic succession, including the Anglicans, which is how some of their priests are able to be accepted as Catholic Clergy, but also Presbyterians, Lutherans, Methodists, and more. But many Protestants, including people who belong to such denominations, would say that while it is helpful for ...


3

Protestants are not generally against the idea of certain individuals having been called and gifted by God to exercise authority over a local assembly of believers, nor a hierarchy within that assembly, nor even a limited regional hierarchy within a denomination. If this authority were what the idea of apostolic succession detailed there would be little ...


2

Here is the full text from Calvin's Commentary. I do not think any Presbyterian or Reformed would disagree. What things soever you shall bind. He now repeats the same words which he had formerly used, (Matthew 16:19,) but in a different sense; for there he intended to maintain their authority in doctrine, but here he appoints discipline, which is an ...


2

Calvin writes a commentary which address this passage in some detail. He summarises it as follows: The substance of it is this: Whoever, after committing a crime, humbly confesses his fault, and entreats the Church to forgive him, is absolved not only by men, but by God himself; and, on the other hand, whoever treats with ridicule the reproofs and ...


1

My own faith group, while not being Catholic, does not employ terms such as "Reformed Protestant" to describe itself, but I can speak to the question posed. With the following being understood, Once Matthew 16:19 and 18:18 are properly translated, we have clear teaching on how to act before God. It is not that we bind or loose and then God backs ...


1

Do pre-tribulational, pre-millennial theologies reconcile with Jehovah's Witnesses? As far as I can ascertain, the answer to your main question must be “no”. However, there is an element of common ground between Adventists and Jehovah’s Witnesses when it comes to the date of what is described as Christ’s “parousia” or invisible, heavenly presence. History: ...


2

Protestants understand that God, as Father, is a revelation of His very nature. God did not choose the persona of a Father – it is who God is. From eternity God has been in relationship with His Son, the Word, whom he begat (not created). They have co-existed throughout eternity, from before creation or the founding of the world: In the beginning was the ...


1

"Why is it significant that God is a Father?" Because God is the Father, the Son of God, and the Holy Ghost. That is what He is. God is "I AM" as He told Moses. "And why did God choose the nature of Father to commonly describe his character, as opposed to other relationships that God created, such as that of Mother or a non-...


1

God as Creator is called Father (Isaiah 64:8; also compare to Acts 17:28, 29). He is also the Father of spirit-begotten Christians, the Aramaic term "Abba" being used as an expression of respect and of close filial relationship (Roman 8:15). All who express faith with a hope of enteral life that is everlasting can address God as Father (Matthew 6:9).


Top 50 recent answers are included