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5

The Catechism of the Council of Trent (Roman Catechism) lists 5 effects of the sacrament of baptism: Remission of sin Remission of all punishment due to sin Grace of regeneration Infused virtues and incorporation with Christ Character of Christian "what keeps immediate re-infection of the soul from happening" after baptism? Concupiscence remains ...


3

Yes, St. Thomas discusses this question in De Malo q. 4 a. 1 "Whether Any Sin Is Contracted by Way of Origin (ex origine)?" (Latin) arg./ad 1: It is said in Ecclesiasticus (15, 18) “Before man is life and death, good and evil, that which he shall choose shall be given him,” from which it can be understood that sin, which is the spiritual death of ...


1

Human soul created and united to the body simultaneously Pope Pius IX, in his dogmatic definition of the Immaculate Conception, Ineffabilis Deus, stated that the Blessed Virgin Mother's soul was free from original sin in primo instanti creationis atque infusionis in corpusin the first instant of [its] creation and infusion into (union with) the body "...


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It is true that very often Harmartia is used to mean sin or offence in the new testament. It could be exactly what Paul means in 2 Corinthians 5:21 as well, even though this has caused no small difficulty in understanding down through the centuries for individuals as much as for entire theologies. There are so many references to Jesus taking away sin, ...


1

God's creation of a soul subject to original sin is part of a broader question – why is there evil in God's creation? One aspect of that broad question is that evil is a privation of good. The Catholic Encyclopedia summarizes the thought of St. Thomas Aquinas: Evil, according to St. Thomas, is a privation, or the absence of some good which belongs properly ...


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The question accepts that every soul is subject to original sin, it then goes on to ask why. One can peal back one layer and say that every soul is subject to original sin because Adam and Eve committed a personal sin, but that does not tell why they did. Can humans obey God's law without God's help/grace? Could God have given Adam the grace to obey? Why ...


7

By yielding to the tempter, Adam and Eve committed a personal sin, but this sin affected the human nature that they would then transmit in a fallen state. It is a sin which will be transmitted by propagation to all mankind, that is, by the transmission of a human nature deprived of original holiness and justice [sic]. And that is why original sin is called &...


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How do Christians who believe in evolution understand Original Sin? Before getting into the crux of this question, it should simply be noted that not all Christian denominations believe in Original Sin or evolution for that matter. If we as Christians are to believe in evolution and original sin, there has to be a logical and theological manner to join these ...


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The only compelling theological reason to postulate a literal Adam was in order to account for the universality of sin — because, in a static universe, there is no other way to account for it. The preceding is from a 90 page paper from the Washington Theological Consortium: Evolution and Original Sin: Accounting for Evil in the World by Dr. Daryl P. Domning ...


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The overwhelming majority of scientists accept evolution by natural selection according to the latest Darwin Day Pew research from 2019: According to Pew research, 1/3rd of scientist is religious. So if you do the math, only a very small percentage of Christian scientists - those most likely to understand all aspects of the subject - actually reject ...


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Per Nigel we all (I), individually, can realize that (I) we've sinned voluntarily personally. Whether 'exactly like' Adam or 'not after the likeness of Adam’s transgression,' Rm 5:14. Which makes the question of 'original sin' moot in a way. Paul--For just as through the disobedience of one man the many were constituted sinners, 5:19; and Augustine--human ...


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