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11

Clarifying righteousness First, let's review the Biblical meaning of righteousness. The first paragraph of the Righteousness article of Baker's Evangelical Dictionary of Biblical Theology edited by Walter A. Elwell (1996), shows how faith in Jesus leads to the Trinitarian God producing righteousness in us, which comes in stages (emphasis mine): God the ...


10

Absolutely, definitely not. Works are important, but we are not justified by works. The Catechism states this unequivocally: 161 Believing in Jesus Christ and in the One who sent him for our salvation is necessary for obtaining that salvation.42 “Since ‘without faith it is impossible to please [God]’ and to attain to the fellowship of his sons, therefore ...


10

You've fallen into a common trap of examining a single piece of a theological system by importing that piece into your own construct rather than seeing how it fits into its own context. A Reformed understanding of soteriology is dependent on several interwoven ideas about God and his role in creation. Note this assumption in your question is not ...


9

If you (say you) have faith but don't have works, do you really have faith? Works are the result of faith. They don't save you. If you have faith, it is only natural that you will have works. James's question is to people who have no works. Why don't you have any works? Where is your faith? Matthew 12:33 (NASB) "Make a tree good and its fruit will be ...


8

Human effort consistent with the will of God, does not oppose God's Grace. However, the words of Jesus to Peter (cf. Matthew 16:21-23), "Get behind me, Satan! You are a stumbling block to me; for you are setting your mind not on divine things, but on human things" (NRSV) are a proclamation from God himself that human effort can, indeed, oppose God's ...


8

James is writing his epistle to "my brethren" (1:2), who are already of the church, so he is not writing to unbelievers to tell them how to be saved from their sins an get right with God. His readers have already come to Jesus and had their sins washed away in the blood of the Lamb, been justified by faith, and entered into a saving relationship with God. ...


7

The Bible states that, "Without faith, it is impossible to please [God]; for he that cometh to God must believe that he is, and that he is a rewarder of them that diligently seek him" (Hebrews 11:6 KJV). That whole chapter lists many people of faith, right from Abel onward. The question you ask is, 'Why does God choose to reward [such] faith?' But ...


6

Clement of Rome, Clement of Alexandria, and Didymus the Blind said things that could be mistaken for the formula, but don't fit all the criteria. The first one to use it unmistakably is Origen, in passing, followed by Augustine, also in passing, though he frequently says other things that are near-hits. It's not until the Protestant Reformation that the ...


5

The note for John 5:29 in the John MacArthur NASB Study Bible (MacArthur is Calvinist) says: Jesus was not teaching for justification by works (see 6:29). In the context, the "good" is believing on the Son so as to receive a new nature that produces good works (3:21; Jas 2:14-20), while the "evil" done is to reject the Son (the unsaved) and hate the ...


5

The answer is provided in one of the passages you quoted: Or do you not know that wrongdoers will not inherit the kingdom of God? Do not be deceived: Neither the sexually immoral nor idolaters nor adulterers nor men who have sex with men nor thieves nor the greedy nor drunkards nor slanderers nor swindlers will inherit the kingdom of God. And that is what ...


4

You are actually asking numerous questions in this question, so I will just summarize the answer and then address each verse you listed. Summary: The protestant view does not link works with grace as the Roman Catholics do. Protestants that believe in once saved always saved (arguable the majority) hold to the doctrine of justification by faith apart from ...


4

I am a Reformed Pastor and I think the passage most Reformed Christians would turn to is: Ephesians 2: 8-9: For it is by grace you have been saved, through faith—and this is not from yourselves, it is the gift of God— not by works, so that no one can boast. Much like Catholic teaching referred to above faith is a gift of grace, once your eyes have been ...


4

I believe the premise of this question is a bit off. I think I know where you're going with the idea that all Christians believe that "God rewards faith" but a good chunk of the Protestant/Catholic divide was fought over this and it's not because we believe the same things but we just call them different things. To Catholics, there are two ...


3

I am asking specifically for the biblical basis of the belief that good works are the fruits of faith. Hebrews 11 addresses this directly. Verse 6 is instructive, for it tells us that without faith it is impossible to please God. The rest of the chapter goes on to tell us how the ancients expressed their faith. Their works were the fruits -- the outflow,...


3

The human effort does not oppose God's grace if this effort consist in obedience to God... Even more this kind of human effort will be the inevitable result of the God's grace. That is called the perseverance of the saints in reformed theology. "Do not err, my beloved brethren. Every good gift and every perfect gift is from above, and cometh down from ...


3

According to Emanuel Swedenborg, faith without works does not save a person (Note: This section can be skipped by those who are interested only in the Swedenborgian interpretation of Luke 23:39-43. The purpose of this section is to establish that Swedenborg, and Swedenborgians, reject justification by faith alone, and believe that good works are also ...


3

Hah, well, you've got a couple ambiguous statements to begin with: "Human effort does not oppose God's grace." "As long as you do your best , God will indeed do the rest." What do you mean by human effort? Effort in what? Doing your best in what? And what is God gracing you with? What is the "rest" that he is doing? If you're ...


3

For the sake of brevity, I have placed a single page regarding the parables of the kingdom here on google docs. A number of the parables of the kingdom, as described in the page, convey that what is 'likened' to the kingdom is not actually the kingdom. The parable itself reveals that the essence of the kingdom resides within something that is 'like' the ...


3

God is righteous and none else is. And this is the answer to your question. God demonstrated his righteousness upon his own Son, righteously laying sins upon him (which were not his own) and righteously imputing sin itself to him (again, which was not his own) that by suffering 'in the body, on the tree' he should bear away sins and through death he should ...


3

What has changed that cloistered catholic monks are not advancing technical sciences and engineering today? The schools of higher education are no longer restricted to monastic institutions. At one time, in Christendom, the monastery was almost the only form of education in Medieval Europe. Not today! Many monastic orders developed over the years. In ...


2

Preface: This site's guidelines says that anyone who self-identifies as a Christian is considered a christian for this site. That means that if you believe in salvation by works alone, yet call yourself a Christian you are, by definition, a group (of one) that believes this. So if there is even a single group out there consisting of two people that ...


2

God's Justice and Mercy To start off, it should be noted that doing a lot of good things does not exempt any of us from human law. I give a lot of money to charities, treat people well, pay taxes, etc. It could well be said that I am a good person. However, a few years ago, I received a speeding ticket. I did not go before the judge and plead "I'm a ...


2

Your answer has "Catholicism" tag, so I'll try to explain Catholic belief that Paul and James are in perfect harmony, that they say the same, just from two perspectives. Let's start with James. He wrote in the second chapter of his letter: 14 What good is it, my brothers and sisters, if someone claims to have faith but has no deeds? Can such faith save ...


2

How is the teachings in the Book of James consistent with Salvation by Grace alone? James 2:17 Even so faith, if it hath not works, is dead, being alone. Many take the verses of James chapter two and see in them a treatise on salvation. However, in context James is chastising church leaders for being respecters of important people and neglecters of ...


2

“Not everyone who says to Me, .. ....but he who does the will of My Father who is in heaven will enter." What is the Father's will? Does the Father's will exclude " .. prophesying, casting out demons, ..... performing miracles" in the name of Jesus? The works of those who do not qualify to enter do not seem evil at all in themselves. They aren't. ...


2

In the Protestant belief, works are a sign of faith, and the Holy Spirit working in the life of the believer. The ESV commentary elaborates on this interpretation thusly: Faith without Works Is Dead. James continues the theme that hearing/faith must lead to doing/works. It may seem that James contradicts Paul’s “by grace you have been saved through ...


2

Jesus said: Matthew 6:16 through 18 NKJV "Moreover, when you fast, do not be like the hypocrites, with a sad countenance. For they disfigure their faces that they may appear to men to be fasting. Assuredly, I say to you, they have their reward. 17 But you, when you fast, anoint your head and wash your face, 18 so that you do not appear to men to be ...


2

St. Thomas, in his Catena Aurea (Golden Chain) on St. Mark's Gospel, cap. 11 l. 4, cites St. Theophlyact, who writes: For whosoever sincerely believes evidently lifts up his heart to God, and is joined to Him, and his burning heart feels sure that he has received what he asked for, which he who has experienced will understand; and those persons appear to ...


2

The notion of "good works" comes up multiple times in the New Testament, so I'll limit my answer to the meaning of "works of the law" in Paul's epistles, particularly Galatians. The NPP soteriological system is really just an implication of the NPP's textual interpretation of "faith" and "works" in Paul's epistles. Surprisingly, Catholicism (especially ...


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