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St. Thomas Aquinas, in his commentary on Matthew 5:19, gives a few different interpretations of the Fathers: […] the least commandments, according to Chrysostom, are Christ’s commandments; hence, Whoever shall break one of these least commandments which I am about to say. And the argumentation can be connected as follows. Since the Law cannot be broken, ...


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There is surely a hierarchy of commandments. It begins with our duty toward God and goes on to speak of our duty to our fellow man; by definition, that is in an order of greater importance to less, inasmuch as God is more important, quite simply, than man. Moreover, keeping the latter are worthless unless the former are kept as a basis - not committing ...


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There is a well-researched 2016 article from National Catholic Register Blog addressing precisely your question, which also includes "extra credit" by describing a Catholic framework for evaluating the credibility of "lost sayings" of Jesus: Are There "Lost Sayings" Of Jesus? The technical term is Agrapha, and the wikipedia entry has candidates for ...


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My answer is based on one minor quibble: Sinlessness is not impossible. At each point where we have sinned, the choice to not sin was available and was possible. It may have involved a cost we were unwilling to pay, or missing an opportunity we wished to take, or (as is often the case) that an earlier choice was required to avoid the sin, but it was never ...


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Jesus claiming to be God would have been blasphemy. Jesus did not make such a claim. Jesus said he was the Son of God and it was the Jewish religious leaders who in their desperate search for a reason to kill him made the leap that claiming sonship was the same as the much more serious blasphemous claiming to be God. Jesus attempted to point out that he ...


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