20

Jesus did not make an explicit statement on the matter, but he did seem to take Genesis as true and historical in some sense. Consider Jesus's words in Mark 10:6ff on divorce: "But from the beginning of creation, ‘God made them male and female.’ ‘Therefore a man shall leave his father and mother and hold fast to his wife, and the two shall become one ...


17

It's important to understand who 'they' refer to. From verse 23 we know the Lord is talking directly to the Sadducees, which say that there is no resurrection. They were asking a question to bait/trap the Lord in contradicting Moses, the lawgiver (see Deut 25:5-10). Remember this question is about what happens in the resurrection when the Sadducees don't ...


15

Jesus claimed both to be God and to be the Son of God. Jesus claimed that he is God. John 10:28-33 (NIV) 28 I give them eternal life, and they shall never perish; no one will snatch them out of my hand. 29 My Father, who has given them to me, is greater than all; no one can snatch them out of my Father’s hand. 30 I and the Father are one.” ...


15

1 Corinthians 11: 23-26 For I received from the Lord what I also handed on to you, that the Lord Jesus, on the night he was handed over, took bread, and, after he had given thanks, broke it and said, “This is my body that is for you. Do this in remembrance of me.” In the same way also the cup, after supper, saying, “This cup is the new covenant in my blood....


14

With parables you have to remember that they are directed at a specific audience, and make a specific point. Trying to extrapolate to draw conclusions outside the purpose of the parable would lead to a wrong conclusion. Parables are also used to illustrate general principles, not to lay down hard and fast rules. In the Parable of the Talents, the point is ...


14

TLDR: The Disciples worshiped Jesus on at least two occasions (Matthew 14 & 28). Studying these two stories is the most logical place to look to see if Jesus commanded them to worship him. Their actions were God-worship, not mere respect. The worship was permitted, not forbidden as idolatry (and punished). The context of the scene (words and actions of ...


13

In order to interpret what Jesus is saying in Matthew 19:4, you must first understand the reference he is making. From Matthew 19:4: 4 He answered, "Have you not read that he who created them from the beginning made them male and female, 5 and said, 'Therefore a man shall leave his father and his mother and hold fast to his wife, and the two shall ...


12

Here are a few commentaries on this verse from Christian Bible scholars. To a large extent, they agree with your suspicion that the men were reacting to Messiah's use of the words "I AM," and the authority with which he spoke them. Parenthetical notes are the original authors'. From Elliot's commentary for English Readers: They went backward, and fell to ...


11

It's not so much something lost in translation, though there may be some cultural factors coming into play. Jews considered the Words of the ten commandments to be minimum requirements, and beginning with Matthew 5:21, Jesus expounds on some the commandments pertaining to the relationship to other other people. The essence of the teaching in Matthew 5:21 ff ...


10

The question as posed contains an implicit assumption that needs to be challenged -- or at least teased out into the open. It is this: that numerical represention of character types in Jesus' parables ought to reflect the proportion of attention Jesus gave to them outside the parables. This is important for the the particular case of "wealthy vs. poor" ...


10

No denomination simply ignores this verse. No major Christian teachers say to ignore Jesus' teachings. But given the different hermeneutical approaches of different people, there will be different ideas about how to apply his teachings. John Stott wrote a widely used commentary on the Sermon on the Mount which addresses Matthew 5:39. Stott is highly ...


9

Words of Jesus' Ministry In Acts 20:35, Luke quotes Paul as quoting Jesus, but the original quote is not attested in any of the four gospels. (Though that doesn't mean Jesus didn't say it.) By all these things, I have shown you that by working in this way we must help the weak, and remember the words of the Lord Jesus that he himself said, 'It is more ...


9

Jesus' answer emphasizes what is more important. It is more important that a person hear the word of God and obey it than to be chosen by God for some special task. Not everyone will be chosen for a special position, but anyone can choose to obey God. Jesus puts things regarding (his own) family into perspective: they are not as important as seeking the ...


8

I don't know if you intend to place restrictions on what constitutes "quoting Jesus" (compared to the Gospels or Acts), but these instances are at least Paul attributing commands or words to him. 1 Corinthians 7:10-11 (NASB) But to the married I give instructions, not I, but the Lord, that the wife should not leave her husband (but if she does leave, ...


8

Can Christians be judges? Yes. We are told to judge others within the church. (1 Cor 5:12) As @CecilBeckham said, we are told not to judge people's hearts/righteounness. (Mt 7:1-2, Lk 6:37) We are also told not to be hypocritical in our judgment (Ro 2:1) Paul endorses the idea of governmental authority in Romans 13, and says Romans 13:4 (NASB) But if ...


8

This is a powerful assertion of Deity by Jesus. You are correct that it is, in fact, Jesus Himself who is speaking here and not the Father. That is made clear in this passage, as Jesus was the One who "was dead" and is now "alive forevermore". 17 When I saw Him, I fell at His feet like a dead man. And He placed His right hand on me, saying, “Do not be ...


8

The beginnings of a response would consider the difference between a simile/parable ("The kingdom of heaven is like..."), a metaphor ("I am the vine"), and a prescription or statement of fact ("Blessed are the pure of heart"). Everyone would agree that Jesus employs a wealth of literary and rhetorical devices to communicate his ...


8

Other answers have dealt well with the theological reasons for taking the words of the Institution literally. I would like to mention that the grammar and syntax of the original Greek make it difficult to interpret the passage metaphorically. Let us look at Matthew 26:26-28. (The parallel passages in Mark 14:22-23 and Luke 22:19-20 are similar, with the ...


8

In context, Jesus just taught his disciples not to judge in Matthew 7:1-5. The kind of judgment Jesus meant is the judgment of a critical and censorious spirit. That kind of judgment seeks to impute motivations to behaviors one person observes in another person. Since quite frequently, people have a tendency to project their own failings onto other people, ...


8

Earlier in John is a verse that could potentially help provide an answer to your question: Jesus answered, “The work of God is this: to believe in the one he has sent.” - John 6:29 NIV Another verse in John a little later (after the resurrection) gives further insight: Then Jesus told him, “Because you have seen me, you have believed; blessed are those ...


8

To understand this answer, we will look at just two aspects. One, Christ speaks literally about many things many times, yet no one believes He turned into a literal door or into a nebulous ghost of a concept like truth. Two, Protestants disagree with transubstantiation not because they don't believe the bible, but because they believe that Christ's ...


7

I'll certainly unpack this for you. Although I would not trust that internet reading alone would give anybody a comprehensive understanding of the Jewish religion (or any other religion, for that matter), you can read about Jewish conceptions of the afterlife here, for example: Olam Ha-Ba: The Afterlife . There is no single doctrine to which Jews adhere ...


7

The words used in this question, for example, “Errorless”, or by using open statements solely without proper parameters like “infallibility” without setting up boundaries makes the question easy to answer. No, Jesus never stated or certified that the apostles where errorless (In all Things) or infallible (In all things), ever. I may be wrong but I feel ...


7

Acts 25:14, "it is hard for thee to kick against the pricks," is a direct quotation from a play by Euripides (d. 406 BCE), the Bacchae, with Jesus speaking instead of the Greek god Dionysus. Euripides had used the plural ('pricks') for reason of meter, and Acts uses the same plural, although it would normally be a singular. In his own epistles, Paul never ...


7

The teaching on this passage from such as Martin Luther (see link below) is that the rich young ruler approaches Jesus as 'good Master'. The young man sees only a master who can instruct him with legal commandments. All he thinks he needs is the knowledge of good and evil. He thinks he has resource within himself to do all that is necessary - he just needs ...


7

I'm going to explain these two terms as they are normally used in Christian circles. When someone talks about "giving their life to Christ" they mainly mean it in the sense of being a completely dedicated follower of Jesus. This is in the same sense that we might say of a dedicated doctor that "she gave her life to curing diseases" - meaning that she spent ...


7

The Christian logic is that God (Allah) incarnated into a baby that was miraculously conceived within Maryam's womb without sexual intercourse, a doctrine called the Virgin Birth. While being Jesus, God remains the Father simultaneously, so at no point in time God loses any of His divinity nor his greatness. Obviously it was God's will and His Divine power ...


6

Short Answer The Bible talks about people who reject/don't believe in Jesus as condemned, judged by the Spirit (in John 16) and by God at the end of this age (Revelation). In terms of "Hell", that's a word we made up later, but in Revelation there is a lake of fire, where Satan is cast. I think those who follow Satan are also cast there. Hell as a noun has ...


6

The Phrase As retained in the Latin Vulgate, and therefore the Douay-Rheims ('the Catholic KJV'), but usually obscured in most English translations, Jesus is actually saying the vast, vast majority of the time, "Amen, Amen I say to you." Which does mean 'Truly, I tell you a (solemn or sure or serious) truth (i.e. so pay special attention)'. In Greek, the ...


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