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14

Traditionally Roman Catholics have identified St. Mary Magdalen with the "woman in the town who was a sinner" of Luke 7:36ff -- that's the Gospel reading for her feast day in the older form of the Roman liturgy. It's true that at face value the Gospel does not identify the nature of her sin but it seems clear that her sin is well-known, at least locally: ...


14

Yes she can You're probably getting tripped up by this passage: 1 Timothy 2:13-15 ESV For Adam was formed first, then Eve; and Adam was not deceived, but the woman was deceived and became a transgressor. Yet she will be saved through childbearing—if they continue in faith and love and holiness, with self-control. Which, by itself and read without any ...


10

The word for "help meet" means more than just a helper. She was to be his counterpart. This is not limited to just man's ministry, but to everything in his life. She was not to be seen as lesser, or just a helper, but as his divinely appointed co-equal complement. This quote I believe explains it better. God Himself gave Adam a companion. He provided “an ...


10

Here are some verses that were often referred to in discussions of ordination of women among ELCA Lutherans. 1) Women first at tomb I know a female ELCA Lutheran pastor who said she felt her call to be pastor solidify after reading the Gospels and seeing that women who came to the tomb were the first evangelists of a resurrected Christ. 2) No male/female ...


8

The summary in Mike's answer seems accurate. I would like to add some further background and primary sources. Evidently, Calvin felt it necessary to write to Sir William Cecil, Queen Elizabeth I's chief adviser, when Calvin's messenger told him that the queen was unhappy with Calvin because of Knox's Monstrous Regiment, which was written in Geneva. In reply, ...


8

What is seen to actually occur if a female were to be the subject of laying on of the hands in ordinations, according to the Catholic Church? The short answer is nothing. The woman in question is not ordained, even after going through the motions of an ordination. Pope John Paul II in his Apostolic Letter Ordinatio Sacerdotalis is very clear on the ...


8

This quote is often attributed to one of the early church fathers, usually to Bernard of Clairvaux or Saint Augustine, although the earliest reference in print was in 1896. There is no historical evidence that links the quote to Clairvaux or Augustine. It is part of a textbook on human anatomy by Joseph Hyrtl


7

The women all died. That was about a thousand years ago, after all. When the edict went out, the ruling was that married men would no longer be ordained, not that the priests who were married would get rid of their wives. Eventually, this meant that all of the women married to priests would either become widows or the priests would become widowers. Below I ...


7

The reason that the Church does not ordain women as deacons is similar to that for not ordaining women as priests. (There is a separate question answering that.) In essence, the answer is that the Church only has the power to act with those powers and abilities that Jesus has entrusted to it; it has no capacity do otherwise. For example, Jesus gave priests ...


6

There is no "official" statement that I know of regarding this. The Church does not consider those who are menstruating to be unclean. There is no rule against being baptized during that time. Temples provide tampons for the women who are. As long as they are using one, there isn't a problem. I read what you were referring to from the link you posted. ...


6

Since the question does not specify a denomination, I am assuming that any denomination is OK. I thus am basing my answers with one of the clearest doctrinal statements I could find. However, it is pretty representative of most arguments that argue against obligatory head coverings, coming from a variety of theologies. Here is a statement by the Reformed ...


6

To preface my answer, not all Church policy is shaped by doctrine. Some policies are practical. That said, I don't know why this is the case, but the handbook does say: 12.2.2. Ward Sunday School Presidency Members of the ward Sunday School presidency are priesthood holders. Also, speaking of the ward Sunday School president: He also oversees the calling ...


6

I'll deal with Junia's gender first. Although the Greek manuscripts are ambiguous as to her gender, Wikipedia says "the consensus among some modern New Testament scholars is that Junia was a woman" and points out that the first known reference to Junia as a male comes from Origen no earlier than the late second century, although from a late medieval copy of ...


6

To my mind, there is a similar question to that of "re-baptism". If someone who is already baptised undergoes the baptism ceremony a second time, it doesn't have an effect. As a priest of mine once said about a friend of mine who had joined a Baptist church: "He didn't get rebaptised: he just got wet." The phrase in the Canons is: Every person not yet ...


5

Willow Creek has held an egalitarian stance about women in leadership since their inception. Yesterday Lynne Hybels reposted the chapter in the book mentioned above on her blog. The link is below. I attended Willow for two years in the 1990s and benefitted greatly from the women on the teaching team and the stellar leadership of the mixed-gender elder board. ...


5

Were there female priests in the temple in Jerusalem at any time? Definitely, Yes! Certainly the ‘priestly code’ of early Judaism assigned the duties associated with the korbanot (‘sacrifical offerings’) only to the kohanim (‘priests’) who were specifically sons of Aaron (Ex.40:13-15). The priestly function also included other temple responsibilities, ...


5

There's really nothing comparable between the two issues: no one thinks that being a woman is sinful, but many Christian denominations think that all sex outside of heterosexual marriage is sinful. When we look the passages which give the criteria for church leaders such as 1 Timothy 3 we see several distinct criteria: being above reproach a husband of one ...


5

Ritual purity is a familiar concept in Christianity due to its importance to the Israelite sacrificial system as described in the Old Testament. The vast majority of Christian churches however do not believe that this kind of physical ritual purity applies to Christianity. Ritual purity is understood to have been a physical metaphor for the spiritual purity ...


4

Let's start by remembering that we are living in very different times from those of the New Testament. 1 Timothy is a letter written by one pastor to another, and not all of it is intended as commandments to the entire church in all places down the millenia. Some of it is Paul giving Timothy good advice for the present circumstances (Sometimes we can deduce ...


4

Disclaimer: This answer was initially posted in response to this question which has been judged to be a duplicate of the OP. Women appear in ministry functions and even recognized roles in both the Old Testament and New Testament which of course, provides biblical evidentiary support for women's involvement in ministry in general and to a certain extent ...


4

The EFCA leaves a large part of this to the local congregation. Very much like some of the Baptist denominations that prefer terminology other than a "denomination," the E-Free congregations are autonomous and able to internally govern themselves mostly as they wish. I am now in a different denomination, but I grew up in a church that moved into the E-Free ...


4

Error: When I wrote this up I, I had misread the question and focused my answer on the office of Deacon. I will need to revise this to focus on the office of Elder. It won't be substantially different but there are a few extra considerations. There is not a very clear answer to this question, but the statement on the CBE seems to beyond the scope of ...


4

Why is the matter of women's authority determined by Eve's acts in her life? 1 Timothy 2:14 And Adam was not deceived, but the woman being deceived was in the transgression. Paul is not describing a penalty on women in general because of something the first woman did. Paul is using Eve as an example of one of the the differences between men and women....


4

The Catholic Church did not used to allow girls or women to be altar servers. In his Allatae Sunt on July 26, 1755 Pope Benedict XIV explicitly cited Pope Innocent IV: Women should not dare to serve at the altar; they should be altogether refused this ministry. He also referenced Pope Gelasius who stated that women serving at the altar was one of the "...


4

The Church of the Nazarene publishes a Manual which details their theology and doctrine. In Page 186, paragraph 501, the justification for ordaining women is presented: 501. Theology of Women in Ministry. The Church of the Nazarene supports the right of women to use their God-given spiritual gifts within the church and affirms the historic right of ...


4

The previous answer is somewhat incomplete. While the Catholic church and most Protestant churches do not have any rules about menstruation and ritual purity, this concept is quite common in Orthodox churches, notably both the Russian and Greek Orthodox churches. There, a menstruating woman is not allowed to participate in some aspects of liturgical life:...


4

I'm assuming this isn't quite what you're looking for, but it would feel wrong to not mention this important miracle: A virgin woman gave birth. Matthew 1:23-25. It could probably be argued that everything Jesus Christ did in his life is "a miracle from God through a woman". Without Mary miraculously giving Jesus Christ the gift of life, he wouldn't have ...


4

While in Geneva, John Knox’s work ‘The First Blast of the Trumpet against the Monstrous Regiment of Women’ was published (anonymously) in 1558. It appears that his book was written against the female sovereigns of his day, particularly Mary of Guise, Dowager and Queen Regent of Scotland, her daughter Mary (Stuart), who became Queen of Scotland, and Queen ...


4

John Piper and Wayne Grudham have published the following books which may deal with the subject of women as pastors: Recovering Biblical Manhood and Womanhood - A Response to Evangelical Feminism by John Piper and Wayne Grudham - A controversy of major proportions has spread through the church. Recent generations bear witness to the rise of "...


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