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What does it mean to pray "in Jesus' name"? Is it a magical formula that guarantees that your prayer will be heard? For example: Dear God, please give me a new bike and a chocolate cake and a magical telephone and an elephant. Also, please kill all the bad people. In Jesus' name, Amen. Does that prayer make more sense because it has "In Jesus' name" at ...


9

God does answer every prayer, but the answer may be “No, I don’t think so.” Mgr Robert Mercer said as much in a sermon (at the funeral of a priest who, gravely ill, died a few days after ordination): It goes without saying that we are disappointed that God gave no miracle of healing. Jenny and Philip went to Walsingham. They prayed. We all prayed. Doctors ...


9

While I'm not 100% certain I understand your question. If you're asking what I think; Jesus implied that the will of the Father, Son, and Spirit are separate, as He spoke a lot about the Father's will. John 6:40, NIV For my Father's will is that everyone who looks to the Son and believes in him shall have eternal life, and I will raise him up at the last ...


9

In the book of Ezra, God speaks to the King of the Persians, who were holding the Israelites in exile: 1In the first year of Cyrus king of Persia, in order to fulfill the word of the Lord spoken by Jeremiah, the Lord moved the heart of Cyrus king of Persia to make a proclamation throughout his realm and also to put it in writing:2“This is what Cyrus king ...


8

According to most Christian traditions, God cannot change His mind. There are those that teach that He can change His mind, a position inherent in Open Theism. However, this is seen as a heresy by most orthodox Christian traditions. It denies the omniscience of God. From http://www.reformationtheology.com/2011/07/does_god_ever_change_his_mind.php In ...


8

The short answer to the O.P.’s question that their will proceeds from the Divine Nature. There is only one Divine Will, and each Person wills with the very same Will. It is misleading to say that the Persons “share” the Divine Will, because that would seem to imply that its use is “distributed” among the Persons—like when people share a sandwich. In fact, ...


8

The typical Calvinist response to this question is captured well by Wayne Grudem in his Systematic Theology: [1 Timothy 2:4 and 2 Peter 3:9] speak of God's revealed will (telling us what we should do), not his hidden will (his eternal plans for what will happen). The verses simply tell us that God invites and commands every person to repent and come to ...


7

ericgorr's answer is really good, but let me write a slightly simpler one. Yes, absolutely God does love everyone. He totally wants the best for them and wants them to be the perfect person they were intended to be. Now the trouble is that for Hitler, being the best he was intended to be absolutely involves not killing millions of people and starting a ...


7

To be fair to Calvin, why not go straight to the horses mouth. Calvin did not believe this kind of verse (1 Tim 2:3) implied God's desire to save every man. Here is where we discover limited atonement as proposed by Calvin and is various different ways supported by the most eminent Calvinists that have ever lived, including in my mind one of the greatest ...


7

After learning a bit more, I felt compelled to answer the question myself. These answers are not universally held, but they are some that I have heard, and they seem to appeal to the text more than to presuppositions. Answer #1: In 1 Timothy 2:4, "all men" does not mean "every single person that was ever born," but rather "all sorts of men, even kings and ...


6

God did not reveal everything at once to the Prophets in the past. Revelation from God is a progressive revelation. Lets see some examples- The Law was a progressive addition: God gave few laws to Noah after the flood (Genesis 9). God then gave circumcision law to Abraham (Genesis 17). At last, the complete law was given in a written form to Moses. Messiah ...


6

This is the question dealt with by the Sixth Ecumenical Council (the Third Council of Constantinople). The council addressed the heresy known as monothelitism. The heresy held that Jesus Christ only had one will. The orthodox position was defined at that Council: Jesus Christ had two natures, human and divine; he also had two wills, human and divine. If ...


5

Charles Hodge provides a simple argument in his Systematic Theology (1.5.13.B). He begins on the same ground as stated in the question: that the glory of God is the ultimate purpose for everything. This, he says, implies that God manifesting himself is the "highest conceivable, or possible good," and that it is the ultimate purpose of creation, providence, ...


5

The Fall indeed glorifies God The reformer that spent the most effort in making his thoughts fully known about this subject is Jonathan Edwards. He wrote two famous books on the topic: Dissertation on the End for Which God Created the World, popularized in modern times by John Piper's edition, God's Passion for His Glory Dissertation Concerning the Nature ...


5

We can pray to God for anything anytime, but He is allowed to respond. The fact that we can communicate with a timeless being is itself hard to fathom. Check out this passage about Hezekiah who, upon hearing that the Assyrians would come to destroy him, prays to God. God then decides to act based on Hezekiah's prayer...or does He? Isaiah 37:14,15,20-23,...


4

You are overlooking several very important points in your question. Jesus was telling this to his disciples, who he knew were going to establish his Church, and it can be said that he was telling them that he would provide all they needed for that purpose. It also is true for us today, but you have to remember that that promise was primarily made in ...


4

Gregory of Nazianzus (329-390) in his Fourth Theological Oration gives an early defence for the doctrine of the one divine will. The context of this paragraph is John 6:38. Let them quote in the seventh place that The Son came down from Heaven, not to do His own Will, but the Will of Him That sent Him. Well, if this had not been said by Himself Who came ...


4

The decretive will of God is where God decrees what definitely will happen. For example, if God decrees that Jesus Christ will return in judgment, then that will definitely happen. The preceptive will of God is where God gives us a precept. This is how we see what God desires us to do. For example, all of the Ten Commandments show us the preceptive will of ...


4

Between God's speaking and our hearing, many steps intervene: The prophet hears from God, either face-to-face (Moses), or through dreams, or visions The prophet speaks The scribe records Other scribes copy A translator reads and renders the Word in a new language in which the words and idioms do not correspond exactly to their original intent That language ...


4

While Paul Chernoch's excellent answer addresses the general case, in the specific example you cite there is no significant difference in the message. You write " should not or shall not ... which would indicate that it could happen but not guaranteed." But the conditional is only one possible meaning of "should". Although should can be used to imply the ...


3

"3. Many people never heard the gospel." Among them are people who don't want to hear about spiritual matters; they are satisfied with this life. Paul the apostle preached the gospel to the hardened Pharisees and they would not listen. They were not thirsty; they wanted life to remain as is. They heard and did not want to change. So it is with many who are ...


3

"This assumes that the request is in God's will, which I think is a safe assumption for healing (?)." This is a safe assumption based on the life and works of Jesus. Jesus is the exact representation of the Father and as such revealed the Father's will to heal in never refusing to heal someone who came to Him and never suggesting that someone needs to wait ...


3

There is not just one answer to this, but rather a combination of many things that we do to allow us to be "swallowed up in the will of the Father." What will allow us to enter the "Pearly Gates" is our actions and the direction we are heading. If we strive to do our best, it will allow the Atonement of Jesus Christ to cleanse us so we can enter therein. ...


3

This is a Bible based answer. This is what Jehovah's Witnesses believe, so it is how they interpret these scriptures. Since you asked for a Biblical basis, not the beliefs of Jehovah's Witnesses, the reasoning behind this interpretation is also included in this answer. Got created Adam and Eve to be good, not bad. So there was no wickedness within them at ...


3

A refutation of Dr. Whitby's: Discourses on the 5 Points (1710). Calvinist/Arminian Debate: "Dr. Whitby asserts freedom, not only from coaction, but Necessity, to be essential to any thing deserving the name of sin, and to an action being culpable; in these words, (Discourse on Five Points, edit. 3. p. 348.) “If they be thus necessitated, then neither ...


3

St. Thomas Aquinas addresses this in his Summa Theologica I q. 19 a. 1 article, "Whether God has free-will?" He answers (c.): We have free-will with respect to what we will not of necessity or of natural instinct. For our will to be happy does not appertain to free-will, but to natural instinct. Hence other animals, that are moved to act by natural ...


3

The Bible speaks of the scriptures being twisted. This is Peter speaking about Paul's letters. Many of which are in the Bible. 16 as also in all his epistles, speaking in them of these things, in which are some things hard to understand, which untaught and unstable people twist to their own destruction, as they do also the rest of the Scriptures. 2 ...


2

I will post this answer as a second post that presents a real 100% Calvinist view as observed by classical Calvinists using their preferred way of expressing their view, rather than my modern preferred way as a 95% Calvinist. The truth is many versions of Calvinism today have a slight mixture of Arminianism in them. The basic difference is that within ...


2

Mawia is correct (+1): God did not reveal everything at once to the Prophets in the past. Revelation from God is a progressive revelation. God is eternal. He exists outside what we know as "time and space". That means that he can see everything within our time and space — he is omniscient. And he doesn't change. However, in order to interact with ...


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