20

The King James (KJV) was translated from a different Greek text than most modern translations. In the early 1500s, Desiderius Erasmus took the best copies of the Greek New Testament available to him, and compared and collated them to create the Textus Receptus (TR), the first Greek New Testament to be printed rather than hand-written. The TR was the Greek ...


15

Pretty much the classic study of the African-American Church in America is E. Franklin Frazier's 1964 The History of the Negro Church in America. Indeed, its popularity can be evidenced by another book, The History of the Black Church since Frazier. In a nutshell, the history of the black church in the United States is what you'd expect: Slaves were ...


10

Foundations: Taxation and private property are in tension The commandment (Exodus 20) "Thou shalt not steal" implies the right to private property, and this is everywhere assumed in Scripture (even in Acts 5). If princes had the unlimited right to tax, to any extent and for any purpose, there could be no private property. All would belong to the state, or ...


10

The passage is most likely referring to the nation of Babylon. Per ESV Study Bible Note: Jer. 6:22–23 great nation. Babylon. the farthest parts of the earth. Babylon’s army had outposts all over the ancient world. This army has no mercy; its horses are so numerous that their thundering hoofs sound like the roaring sea (4:13, 29).


9

Burton L. Mack, Professor of early Christianity at the School of Theology at Claremont, says one can ask any question of the Bible and get some kind of answer. If the first answer does not appear to be helpful, one can look for another answer to the same question, until the right answer appears. In Who Wrote the New Testament, page 299, he says this is a ...


8

The closest equivalent to the British Strict Baptists in the US is Primitive Baptists, also called 'Old School Baptists' or 'Hardshell Baptists'. Like the Strict Baptists they practice believer's baptism and closed communion, take the Bible as their only doctrine, and eschew seminary training (they also oppose non-local missions). This theological statement ...


7

The reason that many of them are considered "Catholic" is probably because there is now a "Catholic Edition" of the RSV and the NRSV. Both of these are gaining traction over the NAB if only because of the superiority of the translation. The major difference between Catholic and Standard RSV is that the Deuterocanon is placed in the standard Catholic order ...


7

Prophetically speaking, there are a few possibilities. The Great Eagle In Revelation 12, the Scriptures speak of a "woman" who gives birth to a "male child" who is to "rule all the nations". It is understood that the woman here is speaking of Israel, as Jesus was born of Israel and will one day rule the nations. It also speaks of a Satan who sought to ...


7

A quick Google search turns up an overwhelming amount of information, mostly blogs. Of the ones the I skimmed, I found this one to be somewhat informative. In addition to this, I think that it's probably also somewhat of a social phenomenon in that it was the first English translation to really gain mainstream adoption (only slightly younger than the ...


7

From a Question and answer page from the United States conference of Catholic Bishops: Q. Are there exemptions other than for age from the requirement to fast on Ash Wednesday and Good Friday? A. Those that are excused from fast and abstinence outside the age limits include the physically or mentally ill including individuals suffering from chronic ...


6

It would be wrong to think that a majority of Protestants are Zionists, but Christian Zionism is nevertheless a substantial movement, especially in the United States. There is a belief among some Christians that the return of the Jews to the Holy Land, and the establishment of the State of Israel in 1948, is in accordance with Biblical prophecy. The idea ...


6

The KJV has been the 'standard' English translation for a very long time - in fact literally for centuries. It had no real rival for popularity until the publication of the Revised standard Version in 1952. This means that in the early part of the 20th Century a huge number of Christians formulated their doctrine based almost entirely on the KJV. When the ...


6

Why wasn't the Bible enough to live by? The answer should be obvious if you consider how most of the colonists (or their ancestors) got to America in the first place: a significant percentage of the original colonists were religious refugees, fleeing persecution from people who believed that the Bible was enough to live by, but had their own opinions of what ...


6

First, just to be clear, this line is about Christ's birth, not about his being carried somewhere. As explained at Grammarist.com here: "Borne is the past tense and past participle of bear in all senses not related to birth," while "Born is also a past tense and past participle of bear, but it’s reserved mainly for use as the passive verb in contexts ...


6

Songwriting is Word Sculpture It is hard to nail down what goes on in a poet's or a song writer's head as they sculpt words and phrases to craft a verse. (As a dabbler in poetry I reach far and wide for rhythm and rhyme. It's not as easy as it looks). Any estimate is at best partly right without an explicit statement from the artist. But there are ...


5

Robert Bruce Mullin says in 'North America', published in A World History of Christianity (edited by Adrian Hastings), pages 437-8, that Southern religious figures claimed not only that was slavery a positive good, but that it was a Christian institution. This slavery argument gained a specific religious dimension, and the northern Protestants faced a ...


5

According to my obsessive Googling, these three representatives are Evangelical or Pentecostal. This makes some sense, given that neither category is listed separately in the map key. If they followed their state demographics, they'd be more likely to be Lutheran or Catholic, but just because they're Representatives doesn't mean they're representative in all ...


5

The short answer: no, Paine's opinion is not widely accepted. First of all, Thomas Paine's opinions on Christianity should be taken with a few grains of salt. He was not a particularly religious person: I do not believe in the creed professed by the Jewish church, by the Roman church, by the Greek church, by the Turkish church, by the Protestant church, ...


5

I have not been able to find evidence of a Baptist argument for slavery that differs from other pro-slavery denominations. Baptist minister Richard Furman (for whom Furman University was named) published a philosophical defense of slavery that alluded to biblical support but did not elaborate on it. The proof texts would have been well known to his readers. ...


5

Our traditional calendar references of AD and BC are neither ancient nor entirely sacred in the sense of a reference to the birth of Jesus. It was first proposed in 533 by the Roman abbot Dionysus Exiguus, but as a practical matter he began counting years from from what he believed to be the year of King Herod's death1, not from the year of Jesus' birth, ...


5

Not all Catholic seminaries require their seminarians to learn Latin unfortunately. Greek is often an elective in many seminaries. If a seminarian is studying from the Extraordinary Form of the Mass, then yes. The traditional Mass is said in Latin and a working knowledge of the Latin language is necessary. More and more, younger priests are requesting ...


4

What do Christians against state recognition of same-sex marriage think of the fourteenth amendment in US law? There is a principle of law called "original intent". https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Original_intent Judges are supposed to rule based on what the intent was of those who wrote a law or amendment. If you consider that no one in the 1800s ...


4

You're correct that nowhere in the Gospels does Jesus condone slavery--nor does he speak out against it. Outside the Gospels, numerous Bible passages have been used in defense of slavery through the years. The starting point for Christian justification of slavery is Genesis 9:24-27. When Noah awoke from his wine and knew what his youngest son had done ...


4

You are correct that John Chavis, although he is reported to have been the first college-educated Black/African in America, was never ordained. He was licenced to minister. It appears that John Gloucester, the founder of the first African American Presbyterian Church in the US, was the first African American Presbyterian ordained. His ordination was on ...


4

This is what the Lutheran Church—Missouri Synod, has to say about the Kingdom of God: Kingdom of God: Term prominent in proclamation of John the Baptist, Jesus, and apostles; evidently synonymous with “kingdom of heaven.” Formerly it was taken for granted that “kingdom of God” is equivalent to “Christian ch.”; contemporary scholars hold that “kingdom” ...


4

The US Conference of Catholic Bishops has published a partial list of approved translations, which contains Translation for Early Youth, A Translation of the New Testament for Children, Contemporary English Version, American Bible Society However, this version is only approved for private use and study. It would appear that the only version approved for ...


4

Why was Thanksgiving in the US traditionally the last Thursday before Advent? The Short answer is: There seems to be no connection between Thanksgiving Day and the First Sunday of Advent. However, the number of shopping days after Thanksgiving influenced the move from the Last Thursday of November (1863) to the Fourth Thursday of November (1939). In fact ...


4

Todd Johnson, who is the director of the Center for the Study of Global Christianity at Gordon Conwell Theological Seminary, reported on the global demographics of the Pentecostal and Charismatic renewal. He does this by first breaking down our demographic of interest into a single group called “renewalists” which are comprised of three “waves”: ...


3

The first thing to notice about the posts linked to in the question is that neither of the theologians in the discussion is claiming that all taxation is theft. Rick Phillips explicitly says "there is a legitimate basis for government taxation". The WeeFlea claims that Sproul believes that "all tax is theft" (both from links in the question). But there is no ...


3

Because the founders were not Christian. The American Revolution took place during a period of history known as the Enlightenment, when Christianity was falling out of favor amongst the European aristocracy and the educated elites in the European colonies. So the Declaration of Independence (and other early American legal documents) were written from the ...


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