We’re rewarding the question askers & reputations are being recalculated! Read more.
22

First of all, Calvinists do believe in free will. This point is often mis-understood by non-Calvinists; but the position that men don't actually have free will and control over their own choices is not Calvinism but hyper-Calvinism -- a deterministic view that goes far beyond that of it's namesake Calvin and the general constituency. With that out of the ...


11

When the five points of Calvinism are looked at as distinct entities, then there does seem to be a bit of redundancy in there. Part of the reason, though, for that is that the five points are emphasizing bullet-point highlights of a comprehensive theology, and they were done so as a retort to the five points of Arminianism, which follows: Five Articles of ...


7

Richard's answer doesn't address the primary issue of Unconditional Election, which is that God's election of people to salvation is based entirely on himself, not on any criteria about the person. e.g. Many people ask me if God didn't simply elect the people that he knew would accept salvation. The Doctrine of Total Depravity implies that there is no ...


7

[...] does the mere act of seeking God mean that the person must be elect? Yes. Reformed theology must be understood wholesale. If you pick and choose some ideas and don't put them in the context of all the other ideas it stops making much sense. This has to do with the presuppositions involved. From a Reformed perspective the answer to this question is ...


6

In Calvinism, it's a paradox. God absolutely chooses whether a person can be saved, but a person is also responsible for his choice to serve and obey God. Obviously, it's crazy to deny any free will at all - Christian or Non-Christian, we make choices every day, some good and some bad. Total Depravity tells us that we will always (and effectively this means ...


5

Monstrous surely is the madness of the human mind, that it is more disposed to charge God with unrighteousness than to blame itself for blindness. Before answering positively, allow me to object to the scripture you cited as an argument to the contrary. The passage 1 Corinthians 10:13, cannot be interpreted to mean that God only commands men that which they ...


4

Calvinists from Calvin to the present day have interpreted this verse as relating to man's assurance, not God's will. John Calvin specifically responds to those who say this verse implies that the "stability of our calling and election depends on good works," saying: [P]urity of life is not improperly called the evidence and proof of election, by which ...


4

Spurgeon's quote is legitimate, but it comes from a translation of the 1655 Confession of the Waldenses, chapter XI, as reproduced in Philip Schaff's Creeds of Christendom: XI. That God saves from this corruption and condemnation those whom he has chosen [from the foundation of the world, not for any foreseen disposition, faith, or holiness in them, but] ...


3

If we have no control over whether we receive or reject grace, someone can never truly know if they are saved or condemned. Reformed theology teaches the doctrine of assurance of salvation, in addition to the doctrine of unconditional election. This doctrine teaches that we CAN know if we are truly saved or condemned. The basics of this doctrine can be ...


3

Marc, You are not alone in your struggles with the doctrine of predestination. Many others (including myself) wrestle with these profound doctrines. In your particular case where God is speaking to Cain, some light may be shed by observing that God is speaking here of "acceptance" which might also be translated "honored." However, God is not telling Cain ...


3

God’s Sovereign Election applies to every human being ever born. That does not mean that every human being ever born will be saved, and universal salvation is not supported within the Five Points of Calvinism. God’s election means that from before the founding of the world God had predestined whom He would call and that God foreknew who the elect would be. ...


3

From John Calvin's Commentary on John chapter 3 John Calvin made much about the love of God in John 3:16 arguing that the cause is the love of God for us, not any good in ourselves, or any quality that belongs to us, but the cause is God's love! Our believing then is a result of God's saving love being applied to our lives, through faith, which is itself a ...


3

According to the definition of free will that you provide, Calvinists do not believe in free will. The basic text for this question is Calvin's Treatise against Pighius, but it is also addressed in his Institutes: 7. That man is necessarily, but without compulsion, a sinner establishes no doctrine of free will In this way, then, man is said to have ...


3

While I'm taking a risk by quoting just one verse--and only a portion of a verse at that--to support my contention, I'll venture forth, going where angels fear to tread: "There is none that seeketh after God" (Romans 3:11b). Whether my following statement does or does not reflect a Reformed, Calvinist perspective, I do not know, but here goes: Dead men ...


3

I believe it is a matter of perspective. I don't see the fundamental Calvinist doctrine being at odds with any scripture, (although many have implemented it in ways contrary to scripture, as with any doctrine). the KJV says: Wherefore the rather, brethren, give diligence to make your calling and election sure: for if ye do these things, ye shall never ...


2

The tough part of answering this question is understanding your meaning of "seek God." Of course the Reformed perspective on salvation (soteriology - study of salvation) is that no one with true faith can fall away. For a solid understand of this, read the Westminster Confession of Faith (WCF) chapters 14-18 (they are short); this is a fine place to read ...


2

The Calvinist understanding is that election occurs before anyone is even created. So, in your ball analogy, before the balls are created, God first determines how many there will be, which ones will be saved, and when they will be saved. He then creates them, and allows their sinful nature and Satan's working to plunge them into damnation. He then saves ...


2

No one ever deserves to be in Heaven. Everyone that goes to Heaven deserves to be in Hell... always. Only Jesus deserves to be in Heaven. The rest of us get there by God's free grace, through faith in Jesus, and through Him dying for our sins. God has not changed his mind on these things. Total Depravity relates to the individual. It means that a person'...


2

Since both the love of God for his own, and the election of God, in Christ, are an eternal matter, rather than a matter of time, I think that the question, in its present form, cannot be answered. What is made clear in scripture is the following : I am crucified with Christ; nevertheless I live, yet not I but Christ lives in me; and the life which I now ...


2

The main issue about unconditional election is the basis upon which God elects people. God elects people to salvation by His own sovereign choice and not because of some future action they will perform or condition they will meet. Those who come to Christ become His children by His will, not by theirs. “They were not God's children by nature or because of ...


1

I think that this extract from John Calvin's Commentary on the verse under consideration is so clear that I need not add my own comment : Commentary on John 3:16,17 “For God so loved the world.” …So we must see from where Christ came to us, and why he was offered to be our Savior. Both points are distinctly stated to us: namely, that faith in Christ ...


1

I wonder if the heart of your question is found in a related question: If God "shows no partiality," how do Calvinists defend predestination? If you are just focused instead on the mechanics of election, I think Romans 8:29 is helpful: For those God foreknew he also predestined to be conformed to the image of his Son, that he might be the ...


1

If you are elected, you will not want to sin or dwell in gross darkness. One is not saved because their works are good; their works are good because they are saved. Acts 13:48 And when the Gentiles heard this, they were glad, and glorified the word of the Lord: and as many as were ordained to eternal life believed. Irresistible grace is the logical ...


1

Although I honestly do not know too much about Roman Catholicism, it would seem they believe in "selective election" or predestined salvation. This is an excerpt from Wikipedia: Predestination Roman Catholicism Roman Catholicism teaches the doctrine of predestination, while rejecting the classical Calvinist view known as "double predestination." ...


1

We need to be guided in our interpretation of 2 Peter 1:10 not only by the context provided us by Peter, but also by the context provided us by all the other inspired authors of the Bible. Thomas Constable, in his notes which accompany the NET Bible at bible.org, quotes Richard Bauckham (Jude, 2 Peter. Word Biblical Commentary 50. Waco, Tex.: Word, 1983) ...


1

Im very impressed with Caleb's explanation of God's Sovereignty and Calvinism as opposed to hyper-Calvinism and those who hold to Man's Free Will choice. God has put it into my heart to delve into this apparent paradox for the last few years. Ive heard the TULIP view and the Man's Free Will views. Both have support in the Scriptures, and both can be ...


1

Unconditional election is elegantly and concisely defined in the Belgic Confession, article 16: We believe that—all Adam’s descendants having thus fallen into perdition and ruin by the sin of Adam—God showed himself to be as he is: merciful and just. God is merciful in withdrawing and saving from this perdition those who, in the eternal and ...


Only top voted, non community-wiki answers of a minimum length are eligible