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It is the having of a son that makes one a Father. Therefore the being "God" is made both God and Father by the begetting of the Son: Blessed be the God and Father of our Lord Jesus Christ, who has blessed us in Christ with every spiritual blessing in the heavenly places - Ephesians 1:3 There are many places in Scripture where reference is made ...


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The Church of Christ always responds using references, as we do not believe in giving our own personal interpretations about things, so I hope the moderators will indulge me this time. How do Unitarians understand Ignatius' views - did he assert that Jesus was Almighty God, a god, or neither? The Church of Christ recognizes Ignatius as the originator of ...


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I suppose I’m a Unitarian^ as I’m not a trintarian or a binitarian. The bible* is the standard by which all other texts should be measured. So who cares what Ignasious says if it conflicts with clear, unambiguous and consistent bible teaching? We are warned about false teachers, it should come as no surprise that they masquerade as teachers of truth. For ...


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I cannot offer a Trinitarian's perspective on this question, but I do believe in the Deity of Jesus Christ. I appreciate that the question was crafted to solicit multiple viewpoints; I'll offer a response representing one of those viewpoints. The easy answer would be to say that 1 Clement isn't canonical, so it doesn't matter what he thought. While I agree ...


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According to Trinitarians, is Jesus the begotten Son of God the Father, or the begotten Son of God? The short answer is that Jesus is the begotten Son of God the Father! Although Trinitarians will haggle to some degree over definitions in place here. I would like to give a response based on the Catholic viewpoint. Other denominations, I am sure will have a ...


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A little consultation with the commentaries of such verses would clarify that such prayers of Jesus were from his human nature, also see his dual nature and hypostatic union. Jesus worshiped as a human, he was truly a human, but did not cease to be divine in the incarnation. This was an intercessory high priestly prayer for the world that they know the only ...


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The words 'Father' and 'Son' provide the big clue here. Both are put together in scripture to show a connection that cannot be broken, as in John 1:14 - "And the Word was made flesh, and dwelt among us, (and we beheld his glory, the glory as of the only begotten of the Father,) full of grace and truth." Then the connection with God is made a few ...


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John 17:3Now this is eternal life, that they may know You, the only true God, and Jesus Christ, whom You have sent. 1 Clement 59:4Let all the Gentiles know that Thou art the God alone, and Jesus Christ is Thy Son. The late, great Father Thomas Hopko, former Dean of Saint Vladimir's Orthodox Theological Seminary, had the following to say, in a podcast on ...


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The first thing to remember is that the writings of the Apostolic Fathers are not primarily, and sometimes not at all, theological treatises. They are most often exhortations to godly living in the world and orderly living within the Church. As such, I wouldn't think 1 Clement 59:4 needs a Trinitarian paraphrase. There is indeed one God. Jesus Christ is ...


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