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14

The Queen of England is greater than me in that she is my Queen and I am her loyal subject.. but we are equal in that we are both human. My father is greater than me in that he is my father, but we are equal in nature, in that we are both human. The Son of God is, and always has been from eternity, subordinate to the Father in his role as the Son. This ...


12

No problem for Trinitarians at all. The context of 1 Corinthians 15:27 is actually a big problem for Unitarians. 1 Corinthians 15:27-28 [27]For he hath put all things under his feet. But when he saith all things are put under him, it is manifest that he is excepted, which did put all things under him. [28]And when all things shall be subdued unto ...


9

It must first be stated that Trinitarianism is in fact monotheism. In Trinitarian belief there is only one God. However the nature of that one God is that he exists in three persons. But it is one of the fundamental doctrines of the Trinity that Trinitarianism believes in a single God. Monotheism is not more primitive than polytheism. It is a matter of ...


9

The Doctrinal Position Trinitarian position usually includes the doctrine of Jesus's having two natures in one person (Hypostatic Union). Armed with both the doctrine of Trinity and the Hypostatic Union, the standard explanation of what happened when Jesus died on the cross is as follows: The Divine nature of Jesus did not die or cease to exist Neither God ...


8

I am quoting from Young's Concordance and therefore looking at the KJV :- Κτιστης Ktistes 'Creator' occurs once. ... served the creature more than the Creator [Romans 1:25] Κτιζο, ktizo - the verb to create - occurs fourteen times. But neither protoktizo nor protoktistos nor protoktistes ever occur in the (KJV) bible. My 1,700 page special American ...


8

"God the Son" as the 2nd person of the Trinity The construct "God the Son" is the name for the 2nd person of the Trinity, referring to Jesus. The concept of Trinity itself grew in the early church father era after the last book of the New Testament was written, and therefore the construct doesn't appear in the NT. But since the bishops of the early church ...


8

Discussing "Whether Christ was the cause of His own Resurrection?" (Summa Theologica III q. 53 a. 4), St. Thomas Aquinas writes (co.): in consequence of death Christ's Godhead was not separated from His soul, nor from His flesh. Consequently, both the soul and the flesh of the dead Christ can be considered in two respects: (1) in respect of His ...


7

Anne's answer covered the reason WHY the Holy Spirit is full Deity in accordance with the Trinitarian doctrine, thus showing that the Holy Spirit is worthy of worship, which the true Reformed tradition should hold. To address your related question about praying to the Holy Spirit, I'll focus on the common practice (from the Reformed perspective) of how ...


7

Reformed theology maintains the full deity and personality of the Holy Spirit, so that there is no inferiority attached to the Holy Spirit that would result in the kind of subordination that the ‘Reformed House Church’ you mention makes in its statement of faith. What they claim seems to be but one step removed from ancient movements such as the ...


7

Original Answer You quote Wallace as follows: For a genitive in simple apposition the two nouns are equivalent to a convertible proposition. Thus, “Paul the apostle” could be unpacked as “Paul is the apostle” or “the apostle is Paul.” What Wallace is doing is making an argument from the Greek grammar. Your own logic is flawed because it takes his ...


6

What is the Catholic view of the Trinity and does it contain a feminine element? The Trinity is the term employed to signify the central doctrine of the Catholic religion, the truth that in the unity of the Godhead there are Three Persons, the Father, the Son, and the Holy Spirit, these Three Persons being truly distinct one from another. Catholics are ...


5

TL;DR: According to Christianity and the experience of saved people TODAY, what fallen (non-saved) people consider "primitive" and "common sense" is no longer the same as the people in the original state of purity and innocence. So to answer your question, it depends on who you ask. To believers Trinity makes more common sense, but to the fallen / unsaved, ...


5

The short answer is: nowhere. But your question is misguided. You cannot disprove the nature of God as Trinity by looking at how the NT authors use the word "God" (Θεός or Κύριος) because within a few decades after the revelation that Jesus was the 2nd member of the Trinity (as God the Son), the NT authors were still transitioning their terminology from ...


5

My understanding is that the scriptures convey that three Divine Persons share one divine nature. I and the Father are one. [John 10:30, Young's Literal Translation] . . . . . . . expresses a shared nature but different personalities. One could re-word this and say that three Divine Persons share one divine existence. Fulness being an attribute of divine ...


5

Father, Son and Holy Spirit are one Deity. This is a matter of nature, just as we are one humanity. But in our humanity we cannot (you and I) be a single humanity. Even if we be conjoined twins, there is only a partial unity. But since God is Spirit and since 'fulness' is an attribute of divine nature, the persons of Deity are divinely one, in nature and ...


4

TL;DR: When the 3 quotes are considered in proper genre and context they fail to support OP's argument. First, it is helpful to distinguish the following 3 angles when reading the Church Fathers talking about the Christian dogma of Trinity. (The section references mentioned below are from the Catholic encyclopedia entry "The Blessed Trinity") Revelation: ...


4

There is a complex Christological history behind this question. The common ground is that Jesus Christ is of two natures, divine and human. Christ's divine nature is uncreated and pre-existent, while his human nature is given through the Blessed Virgin Mary. This was then taken in two ways: The theologians of Antioch in Syria emphasized the completeness of ...


4

Options to consider In the history of conceptions regarding God, Jesus, and the Holy Spirit there have been names commonly assigned to some of them. Over time, those named conceptions have developed a measure of stability and precision as shown in the Wikipedia entries dedicated to them. A very good survey of non-Trinitarian conceptions can be found in the ...


4

It's important to remember that the phrase "God the Son" is a man made theological construct coined with the intention of summarizing biblical truth much like the phrases "trinity", "vicarious atonement", or "plenary inspiration". The importance is not in the finding of these phrases within the canon of scripture but in determining how well they represent ...


4

Regarding the mission (missio = a sending) of the the Divine Persons, The Father cannot be sent:Summa Theologica I q. 43 a. 4 co.:The very idea of mission means procession from another, and in God it means procession according to origin, as above expounded (a. 1). Hence, as the Father is not from another, in no way is it fitting for Him to be sent; but this ...


4

How do Trinitarian Christians explain this to people who neither understand nor believe the Trinity? As an orthodoxly trinitarian Christian, I can only answer by saying how I would answer a non-trinitarian-believing person who asked the question, ‘Who resurrected Jesus – the Father, the Son or the Holy Spirit?’. This would not be with a view to getting them ...


3

I don't see a problem. Father and Son are uncreated and eternal. God is Spirit, as Jesus said.(1) Father and Son abide in a perfection of divine union, in one Holy Spirit.(2) This is an eternal begetting, Father and Son, in one Holy Spirit. (2) All that is created is put under the feet of him who is manifested. (3) He who is manifested is manifested in ...


3

The visions in Revelation that you cited in support of your contention (“that the Holy Spirit is, for all intents and purposes, absent from the major points, events, and these visions held in Revelation…”) seemed to ignore a critically relevant point in Revelation 5:6 about “the seven spirits of God” which are “the seven eyes of the Lamb", who is “the Lion ...


3

Jesus is not the same person as The Father. It is a key part of Trinitarian doctrine that the Father and the Son (and the Spirit) are distinct persons. Therefore is is completely correct and proper that Jesus talks about The Father as someone other than himself. Likewise it is completely correct to call The Father "God" (just like it is completely correct ...


3

If God is un-created and infinitely and eternally perfect then it is reasonable that He possesses uncreated, infinite, eternal integrity. If this is so then there can be no ontological difference between who He is, what He says, and what He does. He has revealed Himself to us in this fashion in Scripture. God the Father is who He is Therefore, as to ...


3

A problem when trying to grapple with questions like this is the way our word ‘persons’ is not really what the original language meaning was. But I don’t want to delve into that as you are specifically asking for any distinct roles the Holy Spirit has that the Father has not. Well, could this be a case of, not ‘cannot have’ but ‘will not have’? Further, is ...


3

I found the following quotes on the doctrine of the Trinity: IRENAEUS – “He is Himself in His own right God and Lord and Eternal King and Only begotten and Incarnate Word, proclaimed as such by all the prophets and by the Apostles and by the Spirit Himself… The Scriptures would not have borne witness to these things concerning Him, if, like everyone else, ...


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