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33

If I might put this in simple language, the Trinitarian position is that there is one God, and he exists in three persons. It is entirely correct, grammatically and philosophically, to refer to God in the singular pronoun. He is One. This is true even if he consists of Father, Son and Holy Spirit. It is worth pointing out that the English language (and any ...


17

That the Son (in regard to his Deity) should have a relationship with his Father, which is a matter of filial and voluntary subjection, does not mean that he is not equal in Deity to the Father. Equal in Divine nature, or 'form', as we see in Philippians : who, being in the form of God, thought it not robbery to be equal to God, [Philippians 2:6 YLT] Yet ...


13

The Christian who experiences the presence of the Holy Spirit within himself, that is to say within his own spirit, experiences the fact of unity of spirit - that unity of person which joins himself with the Divine Person of the Holy Spirit. ... he that is joined unto the Lord is one spirit. [1 Corinthians 6:17 KJV.] Thus, without (by record) and within (...


10

According to the Catholic Church, is belief in trinitarianism required for salvation? Most certainly yes, as from even before the Nicene creed was formulated, candidates for baptism were required to answer several questions to profess belief in the Trinitarian God. From today's Rite of Catholic Baptism (Parents and Godparents answer on behalf of the infant; ...


10

According to Philippians 2 we are to have within ourselves the same mind that was in Christ Jesus. So then Jesus had, in himself, the mind that: Though he was in the form of God He did not cling onto that but instead He emptied himself by taking the form of a servant. (v. 6-7) Having been found in human form (servant) he humbled himself by obedience all the ...


10

Hosea 11:9 says "I am God and not a man." But it says neither "I am God and cannot become a man" nor "I am God and cannot be a man", which the OP has put in the title of the question.


9

The Doctrinal Position Trinitarian position usually includes the doctrine of Jesus's having two natures in one person (Hypostatic Union). Armed with both the doctrine of Trinity and the Hypostatic Union, the standard explanation of what happened when Jesus died on the cross is as follows: The Divine nature of Jesus did not die or cease to exist Neither God ...


9

For most Christians "The Lord" or "Lord" will usually mean either God the Father or Jesus. Sometimes they may mean the Holy Spirit or just "God", meaning (for Trinitarians) any or all three of the above. There are many occasions in the Bible where Jesus is referred to as "Lord", and also God the Father is frequently ...


9

Since God created only the man and the woman, not animals, in His image, you are correct in saying that for God to become an animal would be against His nature. That is not to say that God never used animals to accomplish his will. The classic illustration is found in Numbers, Chapter 22. God was angry with the prophet Balaam, and the angel of the LORD (a ...


8

Discussing "Whether Christ was the cause of His own Resurrection?" (Summa Theologica III q. 53 a. 4), St. Thomas Aquinas writes (co.): in consequence of death Christ's Godhead was not separated from His soul, nor from His flesh. Consequently, both the soul and the flesh of the dead Christ can be considered in two respects: (1) in respect of His ...


8

Short Answer: Johannes Lippius (1585-1612), a German Protestant theologian, philosopher, composer, and music theorist, who also coined the term "harmonic triad" as a set of three notes stacked vertically in thirds. Earliest use of the musical triad as a harmonic entity in Western music The triad became common from 1300 onwards, but the triad ...


7

Original Answer You quote Wallace as follows: For a genitive in simple apposition the two nouns are equivalent to a convertible proposition. Thus, “Paul the apostle” could be unpacked as “Paul is the apostle” or “the apostle is Paul.” What Wallace is doing is making an argument from the Greek grammar. Your own logic is flawed because it takes his ...


7

This is a very good question. And let me say from the onset that I will not "dazzle" you with examples of the Trinity that deals with water, ice, eggs, four leaf clovers sun rays or anything else in like manner. The definition of the doctrine of the Trinity is not an "assumption." It is the normative systematic theology of God in ...


7

There are two or three passages in the Old Testament which declare something similar (Numbers 23:19 and 1 Samuel 15:29). In each case God is distinguishing himself against sinful humanity. The point is that it is his actions which are different from a man's. At the same time, Jesus himself said "God is Spirit" (John 4:24). The Bible consistently ...


6

Seventh Day Adventist Christians - hold the Trinitarian view (I speak from that perspective because it is what I am most familiar with) that where the term Lord is used on its own, which one specifically is being referred to is usually determined by looking at the overall context of the passage of scripture within which the term resides. In some cases, it ...


5

My understanding is that the scriptures convey that three Divine Persons share one divine nature. I and the Father are one. [John 10:30, Young's Literal Translation] . . . . . . . expresses a shared nature but different personalities. One could re-word this and say that three Divine Persons share one divine existence. Fulness being an attribute of divine ...


5

Father, Son and Holy Spirit are one Deity. This is a matter of nature, just as we are one humanity. But in our humanity we cannot (you and I) be a single humanity. Even if we be conjoined twins, there is only a partial unity. But since God is Spirit and since 'fulness' is an attribute of divine nature, the persons of Deity are divinely one, in nature and ...


5

How do Trinitarian Christians explain this to people who neither understand nor believe the Trinity? As an orthodoxly trinitarian Christian, I can only answer by saying how I would answer a non-trinitarian-believing person who asked the question, ‘Who resurrected Jesus – the Father, the Son or the Holy Spirit?’. This would not be with a view to getting them ...


5

It seems to me that Newton is 'sitting on the fence' and acting as a spectator to the arguments regarding the Person and the Deity of Christ. He writes that he can observe in the early Church (due to the presence of what he calls 'Nazarenes') that two camps existed and accepted one another's presence in the early Church, so he maintains : The Nazarenes, as ...


5

Yes, there appears to be a link between Socinianism and Sir Isaac Newton’s views on the Trinity. I say “appears” because Newton was careful to conceal his theology. Extracts taken from this link https://isaacnewtonstheology.files.wordpress.com/2013/06/theology-of-general-scholium.pdf present evidence from recent studies to show that Newton supported ...


5

Use of "Ontological" Are the Father, the Son and the Holy Spirit ontologically independent entities, each one being particulars of universal divine attributes? The word "ontological" is somewhat up for interpretation, so it's difficult to give a clear answer one way or the other without some clarification. With that said, you will find ...


5

St. Thomas Aquinas addresses exactly this question in Summa Theologica II-II q. 2 a. 8 ("Whether it is necessary for salvation to believe explicitly in the Trinity?"), answering (co.): It is impossible to believe explicitly in the mystery of Christ, without faith in the Trinity, since the mystery of Christ includes that the Son of God took flesh; ...


5

The section of the Westminster Confession you have quoted, Chapter I, section VII, explains how there is no limiting factor within the scripture, regarding those things necessary for salvation, which gives advantage to the learned over the unlearned. Just prior to that Chapter 1 Section VI reads (in part): The whole counsel of God concerning all things ...


5

Yes, they be anathema who holdeth that idea: If anyone shall not confess that the nature or essence of the Father, of the Son, and of the Holy Ghost is one, as also the force and the power; [if anyone does not confess] a consubstantial Trinity, one Godhead to be worshipped in three subsistences or Persons: let him be anathema. For there is but one God even ...


5

Origen's View on God Origen of Alexandria (185-232) was a great Bible scholar and an influential early Christian theologian whose contributions has been underappreciated, mostly because he was posthumously declared heretic by Emperor Justinian in AD 543 and because works derived from some of his teachings were anathematized by the Second Council of ...


5

There is a lack of appreciation for the fine and complex texture depicted of the existential and operational relationships among the three of the Divine Trinity in the activities of the incarnated Son. Especially in John, there is an almost maddening interplay between the operations of the Son of God and those of the Father and the Spirit. We are not ...


5

These are easy to answer, specifically because they depend on logical or linguistic fallacies. Argument 1 "The Father is the only true God" "The only true" simply modifies "God," and as such, "God" and "the only true" are interchangable; "You are the only true God" and "Only you are the true ...


5

(I assume that by "the Church" the OP includes the Roman Church and probably its Protestant daughter denominations too.) This question implies that "the Church" is God's church. The problem with this is that non-Trinitarians in general don't believe that what the question refers to as "the Church" is actually God's Church. Jesus ...


4

Regarding the mission (missio = a sending) of the the Divine Persons, The Father cannot be sent:Summa Theologica I q. 43 a. 4 co.:The very idea of mission means procession from another, and in God it means procession according to origin, as above expounded (a. 1). Hence, as the Father is not from another, in no way is it fitting for Him to be sent; but this ...


4

Orthodox Trinitarians believe that the Son and the Spirit are eternally dependant on the Father, just as the heat and light of the fire are distinct from one another, contemporaneous with, yet dependant on, the fire. Just as the light can say "I live because of the fire" the Son can say "I live because of the Father." Yet there is no fire ...


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