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The Doctrinal Position Trinitarian position usually includes the doctrine of Jesus's having two natures in one person (Hypostatic Union). Armed with both the doctrine of Trinity and the Hypostatic Union, the standard explanation of what happened when Jesus died on the cross is as follows: The Divine nature of Jesus did not die or cease to exist Neither God ...


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My understanding is that the scriptures convey that three Divine Persons share one divine nature. I and the Father are one. [John 10:30, Young's Literal Translation] . . . . . . . expresses a shared nature but different personalities. One could re-word this and say that three Divine Persons share one divine existence. Fulness being an attribute of divine ...


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Trinitarian orthodoxy can be formulated on the basis of 3 sets of NT statements, each consisting of one primary and several supporting statements: 1. 'yet for us there is one God, the Father,' (1 Cor 8:6a) "This is eternal life, that they may know You, the only true God," (Jn 17:3a) Jesus answered, "The foremost [commandment] is, 'Hear this O ...


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The difficulty with this article written by Jacob Allee for CARM (20 June 2011) is that not one single verse from the Bible is given. Instead, the author uses a philosophical approach to show how the being of God is different to the being of a human. Here are the relevant quotes from his article: The Bible teaches that within the one being that is God, ...


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Irenaeus of Lyons, in ‘Against Heresies III, 6’ says this about the incarnation: We have already shown from Scripture that not one of these sons of Adam is called "god" in the proper sense of the term, or named "lord". But that He (Jesus) is Himself, in His own right, beyond all men who ever lived, God, and Lord, and King Eternal, and ...


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I found the following quotes on the doctrine of the Trinity: IRENAEUS – “He is Himself in His own right God and Lord and Eternal King and Only begotten and Incarnate Word, proclaimed as such by all the prophets and by the Apostles and by the Spirit Himself… The Scriptures would not have borne witness to these things concerning Him, if, like everyone else, ...


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Professor William Barclay has been somewhat misrepresented by some who object to the fact that he held to some ‘liberal’ ideas (theologically speaking). This Greek scholar and Classics expert certainly was at odds with many Christians on quite a few points, but not with regard to Jesus being God incarnate, the Second Person of the Trinity. Whatever critics ...


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Now this is an interesting question? "Is William Barclay an esteemed scholar recognized by main stream Christianity, or are his views considered heretical in many ways? Personally, I would not consider him an esteemed scholar. I base this on the fact that after reading about him I find him to be a "double-minded" man as noted by the Apostle ...


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This magazine discusses William Barclay From the perspective of many who frequent this site anyone who denies the trinity is not a Christian since a Christian must accept the Creeds. The following from the link above would knock him out of the “respected”and “Christian” categories based in the perspective of many here. Barclay looked at the healing ...


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I don't have quotes for the Holy Spirit, but here are some about Jesus: Ignatius (110 A.D.): "Ignatius, also called Theophorus, to the church at Ephesus in Asia . . . predestined from eternity for a glory that is lasting and unchanging, united and chosen through true suffering by the will of the Father in Jesus Christ our God”." "[T]o the ...


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The modalist view of the Trinity in summary Believing that the Father, Son, and Holy Spirit are God as one person, not three, is modalism only if Father, Son, and Holy Spirit are seen as different "modes," or roles, or ways of appearing, of God. In general, modalism involves the idea that there is no real or permanent distinction between the Father,...


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