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33

If I might put this in simple language, the Trinitarian position is that there is one God, and he exists in three persons. It is entirely correct, grammatically and philosophically, to refer to God in the singular pronoun. He is One. This is true even if he consists of Father, Son and Holy Spirit. It is worth pointing out that the English language (and any ...


13

The Christian who experiences the presence of the Holy Spirit within himself, that is to say within his own spirit, experiences the fact of unity of spirit - that unity of person which joins himself with the Divine Person of the Holy Spirit. ... he that is joined unto the Lord is one spirit. [1 Corinthians 6:17 KJV.] Thus, without (by record) and within (...


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Hosea 11:9 says "I am God and not a man." But it says neither "I am God and cannot become a man" nor "I am God and cannot be a man", which the OP has put in the title of the question.


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According to Philippians 2 we are to have within ourselves the same mind that was in Christ Jesus. So then Jesus had, in himself, the mind that: Though he was in the form of God He did not cling onto that but instead He emptied himself by taking the form of a servant. (v. 6-7) Having been found in human form (servant) he humbled himself by obedience all the ...


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Since God created only the man and the woman, not animals, in His image, you are correct in saying that for God to become an animal would be against His nature. That is not to say that God never used animals to accomplish his will. The classic illustration is found in Numbers, Chapter 22. God was angry with the prophet Balaam, and the angel of the LORD (a ...


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Short Answer: Johannes Lippius (1585-1612), a German Protestant theologian, philosopher, composer, and music theorist, who also coined the term "harmonic triad" as a set of three notes stacked vertically in thirds. Earliest use of the musical triad as a harmonic entity in Western music The triad became common from 1300 onwards, but the triad ...


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There are two or three passages in the Old Testament which declare something similar (Numbers 23:19 and 1 Samuel 15:29). In each case God is distinguishing himself against sinful humanity. The point is that it is his actions which are different from a man's. At the same time, Jesus himself said "God is Spirit" (John 4:24). The Bible consistently ...


5

This question assumes that "the Church" is God's church. The problem with that assumption is that non-Trinitarians in general don't believe that what the question refers to as "the Church" is actually God's Church. Jesus referred to the faithful as a "little flock" (Luke 12:32). God's church is small: “For many are called, but ...


5

There is a lack of appreciation for the fine and complex texture depicted of the existential and operational relationships among the three of the Divine Trinity in the activities of the incarnated Son. Especially in John, there is an almost maddening interplay between the operations of the Son of God and those of the Father and the Spirit. We are not ...


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Origen's View on God Origen of Alexandria (185-232) was a great Bible scholar and an influential early Christian theologian whose contributions has been underappreciated, mostly because he was posthumously declared heretic by Emperor Justinian in AD 543 and because works derived from some of his teachings were anathematized by the Second Council of ...


4

From a physical perspective, Jesus grew in all these things, even though He was still fully God the entire time. For example, we could say His physical body grew in "stature", even though the heaven of heavens cannot not contain Him (cf. John 3:13, KJV). His physical muscles grew as ours, which is how He could feel our pain and tiredness (John 4:...


4

Let's take these one by one. Argument #1 This is indeed a tricky scripture for Trinitarians (the only one of the 16 that is), but scripture is not absolutely clear that it means the Father is the only true God. Among other interpretations are that 3 things are listed - the Father, the one true God (the Trinity), and Jesus. Argument #2 Scriptures referring to ...


4

According to those who hated Jesus, THEY accused Jesus of glorifying himself, but Jesus’ response shows that he did not. That is why he answered, “IF I glorify myself…” Had he said “I glorify myself because…” then he would have been doing what many sinful men do – boasting, and trying to point to what he did or said. Jesus did not fall into that trap because ...


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The conversation begins way back at verse 13 where the Pharisees accuse Jesus of testifying about himself, which thing is inadmissible under the law: So the Pharisees said to him, “You are bearing witness about yourself; your testimony is not true.” Jesus answered, “Even if I do bear witness about myself, my testimony is true, for I know where I came from ...


4

These are easy to answer, specifically because they depend on logical or linguistic fallacies. Argument 1 "The Father is the only true God" "The only true" simply modifies "God," and as such, "God" and "the only true" are interchangable; "You are the only true God" and "Only you are the true ...


3

I will give my own "syllogistic" argument that proves the divinity of Jesus Christ and the divinity of the Person of the Holy Spirit. Obviously we already know the Person of God the Father is God. First I would like to define a "syllogism." A syllogism in logic is a form of reasoning in which a conclusion is drawn from two given premises, ...


3

God was manifested in flesh [TR - KJV : 1 Timothy 3:16] Jesus Christ is come in the flesh [1 John 4:2 KJV] That God is manifested in flesh and that Jesus Christ is come in the flesh is not at all the same as to say that 'God is a man'. The scripture, in the original Greek, is exceeding careful in this aspect and although I support the KJV yet still I have ...


3

How do trinitarians explain the heavily weighted use of singular pronouns to refer to God in the Bible, if God is 3 persons? In School (Roman Catholic religious education) we were told in the first grade that you have to compare this to a principle that is also observable for nearly all persons and objects: A house consists of multiple rooms - although it ...


2

Isaiah 44:6. “This is what the Lord says, He who is the King of Israel and his Redeemer, the Lord of armies: ‘I am the first and I am the last, And there is no God besides Me. The Hebrew word for One is echad and also means compound unity. Isaiah 44:6 starts out compound and ends in unity. Redeemer = Messiah He is ONE He didn't need to say He was God. It ...


2

The answer of the Nicene Creed - and I think also of the Holy Scriptures (1 Corinthians 8:6, 1 Timothy 2:5, John 17:3) - is that there is "one God, the Father", and that his only-begotten Son is "true God of true God, begotten not made, of one essence with the Father". The Son can properly be spoken of as God (John 1:1, John 20:28, 2 ...


2

How do Trinitarians explain the almost exclusive use of singular pronouns to refer to God in the Bible? For Trinitarians there is one God (singular) in three Divine Persons (plural). The use of a singular or plural pronoun will depend on the circumstances in which such pronouns are employed. There is but one God. The singular pronoun is correct. There is but ...


2

Cornelius à Lapide, The Great Commentary (vol. 4): S. Luke's Gospel, on Lk. 2: Ver. 52.—And Jesus increased in wisdom and stature, and in favour with God and man. For stature the Greek has ἡλικίᾳ, “age,” or “proficiency.” See also chap. 12:25. Both renderings are true and apposite. To the question whether Jesus really progressed in wisdom and grace, as He ...


1

It's not so much why does God allow... But more about why wouldn't He? But here is some fundamental evidence for this paradox being quite normal - for now anyway! There are many examples of God 'allowing' bad things to happen. The Garden of Eden contained two trees - one a source of evil, and the serpent who capitalised on this feature to tempt the first ...


1

See also the Athanasian Creed (consider consulting one or more denominations' resources for better translations), which addresses some of these, and attempts, generally, to address the Trinity. I say "attempts" because at least some denominations believe it is impossible to perfectly understand the Trinity. The Trinity is weird. Jesus is God (John ...


1

God, including Jesus, was in no way human at the time the Old Testament was written. It was only after the incarnation that Jesus took on flesh. However, in Old Testament times there were theophanies/Christophanies, where God/Christ appeared as a burning bush, an angel, or a man. But though those things were visible, Christ did not take on human nature at ...


1

The pronoun “ us “ depends upon how a person understand and self interpret the bible. St. Ignatius in his epistle to the Philippians expanded the unity of the three divine persons. Ante Nicene Fathers by Philip Schaff, p. 318. Chapter II.—Unity of the three divine persons. There is then one God and Father, and not two or three; One who is; and there is no ...


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What is the Anglican and Episcopalian basis for viewing the Trinity as a family that should contain a feminine element? There are many overlapping views of the Anglican and Episcopalian Church with that of the Catholic Church. They say a picture is worth a thousand words! The Trinity of the Earth by Jerónimo Ezquerra While the work of the Holy Spirit is ...


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