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33

If I might put this in simple language, the Trinitarian position is that there is one God, and he exists in three persons. It is entirely correct, grammatically and philosophically, to refer to God in the singular pronoun. He is One. This is true even if he consists of Father, Son and Holy Spirit. It is worth pointing out that the English language (and any ...


24

However, most Christians believe that God exists as three persons in one God-head. This may or may not be true. I think it is more true to say that nominal acquiescence of a statement of trinitarianism is widely understood as a 'red line' for acceptance by many denominations. The Nicene creed for example is clearly trinatarian, and so are many 'statements ...


21

John Byl, in his article "Newton and the Trinity", paints a clear picture that Newton was non-trinitarian. Newton's published works do not contain clear statements of this nature. In his private notebooks however, some of which were not examined completely until the mid 20th century, Newton committed a significant amount of effort to criticizing the Church's ...


21

General references to there being separate personages in the Godhead. Luke 3:21-22 (Matthew 3:13-17 similar story/wording) 21 Now when all the people were baptized, it came to pass, that Jesus also being baptized, and praying, the heaven was opened, 22 And the Holy Ghost descended in a bodily shape like a dove upon him, and a voice came from heaven, which ...


19

Without question, Theophilus of Antioch (d. 183) is your man. He wrote in Greek: [God's creations on the first three days--light, sky, and vegetation--] are types of the Trinity [Τριάδος], of God, and His Word, and His wisdom. And the fourth [day, the creation of the moon and stars,] is the type of man, who needs light, that so there may be God, the Word, ...


18

Here are four common defenses of this doctrine: The masculine pronoun in Greek is applied to the Holy Spirit even when not required by Greek grammar The Holy Spirit is shown to be in a coordinating relationship with other persons, such as the Father and Son, as well as humans, suggesting that he also is a Person The Holy Spirit has personal attributes and ...


18

This question is complicated, of course, by the fact that we must work with translations of the original texts in order to find this wording. However, at least three second-century authors use this phrasing when translated into English: Justin Martyr, Athenagoras of Athens, and Clement of Alexandria. Justin Martyr (100–165) writes, in Dialogue with Trypho: ...


17

God cannot sin, not because He lacks the free will to do so, but because it would be inconsistent with His character and His nature. From http://www.godandscience.org/apologetics/rock.html The word "omnipotent" is never used in the Bible, but has been inferred primarily by one of God's Hebrew titles, "Shadday," which is most often translated "...


17

According to mainstream Christianity, the Holy Spirit is a person of the Trinity - loosely speaking a part of God. Therefore he was not created. He is eternal, without beginning and without end. This is best (though not necessarily most understandably) summed up in the Athenasian Creed: Such as the Father is; such is the Son; and such is the Holy Ghost. ...


17

That the Son (in regard to his Deity) should have a relationship with his Father, which is a matter of filial and voluntary subjection, does not mean that he is not equal in Deity to the Father. Equal in Divine nature, or 'form', as we see in Philippians : who, being in the form of God, thought it not robbery to be equal to God, [Philippians 2:6 YLT] Yet ...


15

This is one of the popular misconception of trinity and incarnation. Jesus as Logos (The Word) is divine. He existed in that form for eternity in the Trinity. But the humanity of Christ did NOT exist before incarnation. Humanity of Christ consists of his human soul and body. Humans are made up of soul and body, so when Christ became human, ie., when he took ...


15

This is not a very good Trinitarian objection for a number of reasons. First, the incarnation occurred at a definite point in history. As the Nicene/Constantinopolitan creed states, "[He] was made man." At the point Numbers became canonical, the Son of God was not yet incarnate. But perhaps more fundamentally, we should not read the Bible in a rigidly ...


15

The Queen of England is greater than me in that she is my Queen and I am her loyal subject.. but we are equal in that we are both human. My father is greater than me in that he is my father, but we are equal in nature, in that we are both human. The Son of God is, and always has been from eternity, subordinate to the Father in his role as the Son. This ...


14

God cannot sin, because sin is defined in relation to who God is and what He does. Anything God does cannot be sin, simply because God did it. Sin is a failure to live up to God's standard.


14

Update: The short answer: No; it seems that partialism is not a "real," historically defined heresy. Explanation: Before writing this post, I checked the applicable titles from among my usual textual sources -- a variety of historic theological works that are now in the public domain and available online. When that yielded no references to "partialism," I ...


14

It depends on who you ask. That's because it depends upon how you interpret the meaning of certain Biblical passages. Both Trinitarians and Non-trinitarians feel very strongly that their doctrine is taught clearly in the Bible. Trinitarians will answer, "Yes, Jesus did teach the doctrine of the trinity." Non-trinitarians will answer, "No, Jesus never ...


14

Therefore go and make disciples of all nations, baptizing them in the name of the Father and of the Son and of the Holy Spirit, (Matthew 28:19, NIV) I charge you, in the sight of God and Christ Jesus and the elect angels, to keep these instructions without partiality, and to do nothing out of favoritism. (1 Timothy 5:21, NIV) The core difference is those ...


13

There are countless works already done on Trinity. Inspired by all these existing works, here is how we may address the question to whom Jesus prays to. Jesus never said "I am God" nor "I am the Father" but said "I and my Father are one". The New Testament always address Jesus as the Lord, the Christ, the Word of God and the Son of God. One with Father? ...


13

Understanding the second part of your question is the key to answering the first part. Part One: (How the Spirit was with them before and after Jesus "going away") In John 3:34, it is said of Christ that He had the Spirit of God "without measure". So as He was living on Earth as a perfect sinless man, Jesus had unlimited access to the Holy Spirit, who ...


13

This is where the doctrine of the hypostatic union is essential. Jesus the Son of God is one person, but he has two natures: the divine nature, and a human nature. The two natures cannot be divided, but neither are they mixed in the union to become hybrid natures. The divine nature cannot die, but the human nature can. Jesus died completely in his human ...


13

The Christian who experiences the presence of the Holy Spirit within himself, that is to say within his own spirit, experiences the fact of unity of spirit - that unity of person which joins himself with the Divine Person of the Holy Spirit. ... he that is joined unto the Lord is one spirit. [1 Corinthians 6:17 KJV.] Thus, without (by record) and within (...


12

The following is an attempt to alleviate much of the confusion in the Christian, 21st century mind, regarding the Doctrine of the Trinity and the confused idea that "God is one Person and the Father, Son and Holy Spirit are each Persons, yet we do not have four persons but three and not three Gods, but one. The old 3 in 1 and 1 in 3 problem." Much of what ...


12

From a Trinitarian standpoint there is nothing to reconcile. As with most things, the answer is found in the context. The whole of John 1:18 reads: "No one has seen God at any time; the only begotten God who is in the bosom of the Father, He has explained Him." (NASB) The person John refers to here is the same one Jesus exclaims in John 6:46: "Not that ...


12

Two early church writings can be seen to address this issue: the Didache and Justin Martyr's First Apology. Didache Early evidence for a trinitarian formula in baptism might be found in the Didache, which is commonly dated to the late first century: And concerning baptism, baptize this way: Having first said all these things, baptize into the name of the ...


12

For the Catholic Church and other Nicene churches (the Eastern Orthodox, the Oriental Orthodox, the Armenian Orthodox, the Assyrians; as well as the majority of Protestants), the divine name YHWH (which is closely linked to the expression “I am” or “I Am Who I Am” (see Ex. 3:14), applies to God in His divine nature—hence to all three Persons of the Trinity. ...


12

No problem for Trinitarians at all. The context of 1 Corinthians 15:27 is actually a big problem for Unitarians. 1 Corinthians 15:27-28 [27]For he hath put all things under his feet. But when he saith all things are put under him, it is manifest that he is excepted, which did put all things under him. [28]And when all things shall be subdued unto ...


11

For more than 3,000 years, Jews have repeated Deuteronomy 6:4. “Hear, O Israel: The Lord our God is one Lord.” This sacred passage has been held in high esteem and memorized by Jews for centuries. Jesus also taught about “the only true God” John 17:3 And this is life eternal, that they might know thee the only true God, and Jesus Christ, whom thou hast sent....


11

As far as we know, he did not use this analogy. It does not appear in the extant writings attributed to him, nor in early hagiographies. There are several places in these documents where a shamrock metaphor wouldn't go completely amiss, and yet it doesn't seem to appear anywhere. In the Confession attributed to Patrick, he talks a lot about how he is a ...


11

Yes, it's long! Yes, I know this is a long answer. Sorry about that! However, given the huge amount of ink (and pixels) that has been expended on the doctrine of the Trinity for almost two thousand years now, I do not see how justice can be done to the subject in the brief answers that are preferred here on StackExchange. I therefore ask for your patience ...


11

Leo the Great wrote for the Council of Chalcedon in 451, It does not belong to the same nature to say, "I and the Father are one," and to say, "The Father is greater than I." For although there is in the Lord Jesus Christ a single person who is of God and of man, the insults shared by both have their source in one thing, and the glory that is shared in ...


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