31

Yes, Catholics do believe that the bread and wine are transformed into the body and blood. Sort of. The "sort of" is because the technicalities of it go back to Aristotelian philosophy, which greatly influenced Thomas Aquinas, who is still in many ways the preeminent theologian of the Catholic Church. Before we get to Aquinas, though, let's look at the ...


26

Your girlfriend sounds correct. It may sound silly at first, but the doctrine of Transubstantiation is a well developed, detailed explanation of what happens during the consecration of the bread and wine. It is not a minor thing. The Catholic doctrine of Transubstantiation teaches that the substance of the bread, what the bread really is, becomes the Body ...


18

You are correct that most Protestants do not see the bread and wine as anything more than symbols. There is no blessing that is ever attempted to transform the elements into the literal body and blood of Christ. Consequently, the bread and wine (or juice) that could be stored for long periods of time prior to the observance of the Eucharist (the Lord's ...


17

On the Meaning of Transubstantial To me, the prefix "trans" is the key. Transformation is change of form Transmutation is change of shape Transfiguration is change of appearance Transubstantiation is the change of substance. While often one will be related to another, it does not follow that there is a co-dependence. So, while it is possible that ...


14

Why are we "eating" the flesh and blood of Christ? 1. Because Jesus commanded us to In the institution of the Eucharist, Jesus explicitly commands us to eat the bread and drink the wine, saying "This do in remembrance of me." Indeed, as often as we do this, we do "proclaim the Lord's death until He come." Indeed, John goes even further, recording Jesus in ...


13

Side note: The issue isn't really about the doctrine of sola scriptura, but rather about literalism. "Sola scriptura" is a term used by Protestants to mean that we believe scripture is the only ultimate authority, as opposed to Catholic doctrines that the teachings of the Church fathers have equivalent or comparable authority to scripture. But nothing in ...


11

There's no difference between the two in respect of Eucharistic transubstantiation; hence answering "the spiritual", "the natural", or "both" are equally meaningless. My answer to a question on the Catholic understanding of the nature of transubstantiation is supposed to make it clear that what is changed in transubstantiation is the substance of the bread; ...


11

To complement Belinda’s answer, although the Church does not descend in so much detail, St. Thomas Aquinas in his Summa theologiae makes the following commentary in III Pars, q. 77, a. 4, responsum. But if the change be so great that the substance of the bread or wine would have been corrupted, then Christ's body and blood do not remain under this ...


10

There are several churches which use the idea of transubstantiation; but the Eastern churches (Eastern Orthodox, Oriental Orthodox, and Assyrian Church of the East) share a similar view on how it works. I'll therefore split my discussion into two parts, the "Eastern" and "Western" views. Eastern View The Eastern churches have occasionally used the term "...


9

Most adherents of sola scriptura are memorialist in their understanding of the Eucharist. This means they believe Jesus was using a metaphor (albeit one God had intentionally set up beforehand). In the same way that the Scapegoat prefigured Christ*, or the Rock that Moses beat instead of struck prefigured Christ, so too the bread in the Passover prefigured ...


9

Yes, this is the teaching of the Catholic Church. The Catechism of the Catholic Church states: 1366 The Eucharist is thus a sacrifice because it re-presents (makes present) the sacrifice of the cross, because it is its memorial and because it applies its fruit: [Christ], our Lord and God, was once and for all to offer himself to God the Father by ...


9

Simple answer: Not all The opinions of the early Reformers were divided on this issue, with Luther on one end of the spectrum: When asked whether Lutherans should do away with the Elevation of the Host in the liturgy, Luther consistently replied in 1544: By no means, for such abrogation would tend to diminish respect for the Sacrament and cause it to ...


9

Consubstantiation (also called impanation) says that, after consecration, bread remains and Christ becomes present within, among, or "along-side" the bread. Transubstantiation says no bread remains after consecration; the substance of bread no longer exists, having been replaced by the Body, Blood, Soul, and Divinity of Christ. "Consubstantiation" from Fr. ...


8

How is this explained in the transubstantiation belief system? According to Catholic doctrine, the mechanism of transubstantiation is a mystery and a miracle. The physical process is not explained. From Pope Paul VI, The Mystery of Faith, that is, the ineffable gift of the Eucharist that the Catholic Church received from Christ, her Spouse, as a pledge ...


8

The beginnings of a response would consider the difference between a simile/parable ("The kingdom of heaven is like..."), a metaphor ("I am the vine"), and a prescription or statement of fact ("Blessed are the pure of heart"). Everyone would agree that Jesus employs a wealth of literary and rhetorical devices to communicate his beautiful message, and any ...


8

Other answers have dealt well with the theological reasons for taking the words of the Institution literally. I would like to mention that the grammar and syntax of the original Greek make it difficult to interpret the passage metaphorically. Let us look at Matthew 26:26-28. (The parallel passages in Mark 14:22-23 and Luke 22:19-20 are similar, with the ...


8

The short answer is “yes.” The appearances of bread and wine left after the Consecration have all of the physical characteristics (“accidents”) of bread and wine, including the ability to be incorporated into the body. (Obviously, the quantities are insufficient for someone to live off them, but they are metabolized by the body in the normal way. If we are ...


8

To understand this answer, we will look at just two aspects. One, Christ speaks literally about many things many times, yet no one believes He turned into a literal door or into a nebulous ghost of a concept like truth. Two, Protestants disagree with transubstantiation not because they don't believe the bible, but because they believe that Christ's ...


8

Transubstantiation Transubstantiation is a Latin word consisting of trans (a transition or change) and substantia (substance, or what [makes a thing what] a thing is). Properly, then, it means 'change of what it is.' This was naturally adopted by a Christians (the East use the Greek equivalent, however, metaousia), who believed that the words of ...


7

Episcopalians: The ushers count the congregation and count the wafers to match. If they miscounted the Priest in charge reserves the wafers in a "tabernacle" on the altar. They drink all of the wine/water. If a wafer is dropped it is retrieved quickly and consumed by the Priest. Whether or not individuals believe the wafer is the actual body of Christ is ...


7

Transubstantiation occurs during the consecratory thanksgiving during the single act of worship called the liturgy of the Eucharist. 1377 The Eucharistic presence of Christ begins at the moment of the consecration and endures as long as the Eucharistic species subsist. http://www.vatican.va/archive/ENG0015/__P41.HTM During Mass the liturgy of the ...


7

The answer to the O.P.'s question is rather straightforward: the body that is adored in the Eucharist is Jesus’ resurrected body. As the Church solemnly defined in the Council of Trent (which simply formalized what the Church has believed from the beginning), Because Christ our Redeemer said that it was truly his body that he was offering under the ...


7

CCC #1377 The Eucharistic presence of Christ begins at the moment of the consecration and endures as long as the Eucharistic species subsist. Christ is present whole and entire in each of the species and whole and entire in each of their parts, in such a way that the breaking of the bread does not divide Christ The Eucharist remains Christ's body until ...


7

Pew research does some awesome polls on questions like this. About half of those polled (52%) say, incorrectly, that Catholicism teaches that the bread and wine used for Communion are symbols of the body and blood of Jesus. Just four-in-ten people correctly answer that, according to the Catholic Church, the bread and wine actually become the ...


6

Exactly when during the Mass does transubstantiation occur? It occurs when a priest, in persona Christi (in the person of Christ), says the Words of Institution. Even though the complete words of institution are necessary, the common view of theologians is that the eight words, "this is my body" and "this is my blood", are on their own the necessary and ...


6

The bread and wine we offer at Mass do become, in Catholic understanding, "truly, really, and substantially, the body and blood together with the soul and divinity of our Lord Jesus Christ"1, and this is what we consume in the Eucharist. However, this does not mean—as I mentioned in this answer—that the sacrificial offerings are no longer like ...


6

So, what are the Biblical arguments against Transubstantiation? Matthew 26:26-28 And as they were eating, Jesus took bread, and blessed it, and brake it, and gave it to the disciples, and said, Take, eat; this is my body. And he took the cup, and gave thanks, and gave it to them, saying, Drink ye all of it; For this is my blood of the new ...


6

J. N. D. Kelly (Early Christian Doctrines) contends that the early conception of the real presence was the result of a connection made between the OT sacrificial system and the eucharist. Citing the Didache, Justin Martyr, and Irenaeus, he writes: Malachi's prediction (1, 10 f.) that the Lord would reject the Jewish sacrifices and instead would have 'a ...


5

We interpret them figuratively, not literally. It's the same reason we don't believe God is literally a rock, a tower, or a shield, even though scripture describes Him in all those ways. Same reason we don't believe Jesus is literally a lamb, a lion, a hen, a piece of bread, a stone, a gate or door, or a vine. Same reason we don't believe that the new ...


5

On the contrary, St John of Damascus himself says: since it is man's custom to eat and to drink water and wine, He connected His divinity with these and made them His body and blood in order that we may rise to what is supernatural through what is familiar and natural. The body which is born of the holy Virgin is in truth body united with divinity, not ...


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