17

This potential discrepancy is addressed in Apologetics Press' question: Did Both Thieves Revile Christ? Possible resolutions to the discrepancies between the accounts: Possibility #1: Initially, both thieves reviled Christ, but then one of them repented. After hearing Jesus’ words on the cross, and seeing His forgiving attitude, the one thief may ...


14

Survey of Roman law A now deleted (near) duplicate of this question asked if a claim that the Roman law forbid the crucifixion of thieves, so I'll start with that question, which is highly relevant to our exegesis of the Gospel accounts. There are a lot of claims on the Internet and in popular-level books about Roman crucifixion. Some common claims ...


13

The story is found in the Apocryphal Arabic Gospel of the Infancy of the Saviour: (23) And turning away from this place, they came to a desert; and hearing that it was infested by robbers, Joseph and the Lady Mary resolved to cross this region by night. But as they go along, behold, they see two robbers lying in the way, and along with them a great number ...


8

These two different accounts in Luke 23:39 on one side and Mark 15:32 and Mathew 27:44 on other side can be reconciled. by supposing that, at first, both of them reviled the Saviour, and that it is of this fact that Matthew and Mark speaks. Afterwards one of them relented, and became penitent-- perhaps from witnessing the patient sufferings of Christ. It is ...


7

Much of the Question has already been answered, so I will address the concern of the OP. “It would seem that he did no or minimal good works, and it's most likely that he wasn't baptised.” As to his Baptism: The CCC defines Martyr as fallows MARTYR: A witness to the truth of the faith, in which the martyr endures even death to be faithful to Christ. ...


5

The story has two major points--the boy who performed the search, and the revelation much later of the boy's identity as the penitent thief. Considering that the Bible says nothing about such a boy even existing, and that it does not give the penitent thief any identity beyond "some criminal who happened to be getting crucified at the same time as Jesus," ...


5

There is no biblical evidence to support any suggestion that the repentant criminal on the cross had ever been baptised, or not. The Bible doesn’t say. However, the fact that he knew about Jesus coming into his Kingdom may suggest he was thinking of the resurrection at the end of the time, when Jesus would be raised up and vindicated by God. The Pharisees ...


4

The Catholic Church certainly teaches that the good thief—often traditionally called St. Dismas—did in fact merit and receive salvation: The parable of the poor man Lazarus and the words of Christ on the cross to the good thief, as well as other New Testament texts speak of a final destiny of the soul—a destiny which can be different for ...


2

The Greek work kleptes refers to a common thief; but in Matthew and Mark's account of the thieves crucified, the Greek word lestes is used, which has the root meaning "to plunder." Though we don't have information on the nature of their crimes, the use of this term indicates they were probably a part of a rebel group.


2

There is no mention of the crimes committed by thieves that were crucified along with Jesus Christ. But through the testimony of the repented thief, we know that both of those thieves deserved crucifixion. So they have committed crimes that deserved crucifixion. Luke 23:39-43 (NIV): "One of the criminals who hung there hurled insults at him: “Aren’t ...


2

The most probable reason that he said that is because Crucifixion was so horrendous that it was reserved for the most egregious crimes against Rome. Usually rebellion or sedition. Common criminals were not crucified. It was so horrible that Roman citizens were usually exempt from it. The punishment of Roman crucifixion was chiefly inflicted on slaves and ...


2

The OP has not ask for a particular denomination to give answers to his question so I will bring in my reformed/calvinist belief. Although this will be just my thoughts from scripture, there are some things that God's word does not share with us perhaps leaving us with different meanings to encourage us at different points or growth with our walk with Him. ...


1

Since the OP mentions that the thief's baptismal state is used by some to draw conclusions about salvation, I will do more than answer the title question. As others have said, we are not told one way or the other whether the thief had undergone baptism of any sort. We do know that he died prior to the commandment being given under the Christian dispensation;...


1

Remember that the original Greek didn't use punctuation, and whatever you see in English versions has been added by the translators, often based on their previous understanding of tradition. In this case, the appropriate place for a comma in that verse could have been inserted after, rather than before the word "today". That would give it a completely ...


1

I can't find a definite answer in Church teaching, which doesn't usually engage in speculation of this sort. On the one hand, as you point out, the patriarchs and prophets are considered to have been waiting in the "limbo of the fathers", sometimes also called "the bosom of Abraham"; that is, they are considered to have been waiting "outside" heaven for the ...


1

Paula Fredriksen, a convert to Judaism, writes: “His death, is the single most solid fact about Jesus life. He was executed by the Roman prefect Pilate, on or around Passover, in the manner Rome reserved particularly for political insurrection namely crucifixion. Her scholarly opinion is that Jesus and those with him were crucified for political ...


1

lēstēs The word tranlated as robbers, actually translates "To seize" or "one who seizes prey" The word is also used to discribe Barrabbis in John 18:40. Very few would argue that Barrabbis was not a rebel, those who would most certainly be crucified by the Romans.


1

Keep it simple!!!! The fact of the matter is in any multiple witness testimony is always going to differ slightly, because of our own individual take on things. In a court case it would be highly suspect if multiple witnesses gave identical testimonies, as opposed to similar testimonies. Both criminals, rebels, outlaws... Cursed him, but later one had a ...


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