11

Although the Bible does contain a certain amount of direct, doctrinal teaching, much of its teaching comes in the form of stories. In the Old Testament, there are the various narratives of people and nations and their actions, both good and bad. In the New Testament, there is the story of the life of Jesus and of the people who surround him, who do things ...


7

Comparing the representative democracy of America with the kingdom of God is an unparalleled category error. The entire reason American jurisprudence holds a person innocent until proven guilty is because we assume that we are not privy, at the outset, to all of the pertinent facts. You may accept this or not but the Scripture declares that God knows the ...


7

Yes, your arguments are correct. Here is some expansion and support… The first and best answer to suffering is the freewill defense. For God to make free creatures is worthwhile; truly free creatures are able to act for good or evil. People who cannot do certain things are not truly free. A person needs no other response, but other responses are available ...


6

I don’t currently personally affirm libertarian free will, though I used to. It’s been a subject of great interest to me so I’ve researched it at length. If a strong case can be made from the Bible, I think it would have to start with the following passages. Descriptive passages that sound like libertarian free will It’s hard to deny these passages sound ...


6

The problem with the Problem of Evil is that aside from the stated points, it also includes an unspoken premise that this life is all that matters. If that premise is true, then the Problem of Evil exposes a very serious flaw in Christian theology: the very concept of the Christian God is self-contradictory, and therefore invalid. Christianity, however, is ...


6

Before continuing, it should be noted that this topic is discussed among theologians, but there is no official teaching which all Catholics are bound to. That's true for most questions which begin with "Why doesn't God just?" This is especially true in a specific case. Your question is one of theodicy. It can be made briefer with "Why do good things happen ...


5

The problem is known as "theodicy". Actually, this is just one portion of the problem of theodicy, but it's part of the "How can a good God permit evil?" question. "How God could create beings that will go to Hell" is subset of the problem of theodicy. This is one of the most commonly covered questions in the field of Apologetics. A Bing/Google/(Choose ...


5

Yes, it is an open question. Yes, it is a "solved" question. No, it is not an OR question. The question you are asking "Is Theodicy an "open" question or a solved one?" is based on a faulty premise. Namely, "open" does not mean "unanswered" or "unsolved" - it means one that is continually being investigated. Thus, the opposite of an "open" problem isn't ...


5

Part of the "Problem of Evil" from the Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saint's perspective is that following the logic of the Problem of Evil was Satan's plan before this life (cf. Moses 4:1–4—that Satan "sought to destroy the agency of man" so "that one soul shall not be lost.") This life was a test to "…prove them ...


5

"the modern Bibles are bounded (sic) to have contradictions because of copyist errors and translation errors." The premise of the question is insubstantial. I am assuming the question speaks of the Greek scripture only and that the OP accepts the veracity of the Hebrew scripture due to the meticulous way in which the Hebrew scribes kept the ...


4

I write from a reformed, Calvinist point of view which includes three things: I believe in the complete sovereignty of God in all things, he does whatever he pleases in heaven and on earth (Isaiah 46:9-10; Daniel 4:35, 5:21); and I believe in the responsibility of man, that man is solely to be blamed for all his sins including for his rejection of Christ; ...


4

There are a lot of answers to this question, but none that directly reference my preferred verses in Romans or the story of the Exodus. I like using these verses, because they appear in the same context as the ones used to "prove" lack of free-will. The story of the plagues in the book of Exodus After the first plague, Exodus 7:22-23 Then the magicians ...


4

In my experience free will is generally justified based on reasoning about: Accounts of Jehovah giving people a chance to repent before being destroyed. If he already knows that they will not repent, there's no reason to delay their judgement. Revelation 2:21 Luke 15:7 Acts 17:30 Job 8:5 Accounts of those with God's blessing later losing that blessing ...


3

The Doors of the Sea by David Bentley Hart, from an Orthodox perspective. The Justification Of God by John Piper, from a Reformed perspective. This book is more focused on the question of how can God be called good if he has sovereignly ordained that some people be damned, but the existence of God is clearly an implication of that question. As it's written ...


3

It is unarguable that no autographs of either the Hebrew, or the Greek scriptures have been discovered. Those, however, contain only written words, but this question invokes Matthew 24:35, which covers all the spoken words of Jesus, not just the few words written down by some of those who spent years with him. As the apostle John pointed out in his gospel ...


2

First I'm going to assume agency is the ability and privilege God gives us to choose and to act for ourselves. The earliest reference I can find is in Genesis 2:16 where Adam can freely choose what tree to eat from (except from the tree of knowledge of good and evil). And the Lord God commanded the man, saying, Of every tree of the garden thou mayest ...


2

In her novel The Minister's Wooing, written in 1859, Harriet Beecher Stowe offers the death of Christ as a response to the problem of evil. She does it in the voice of one of the characters, but it is safe to assume from the context that she agreed with his sentiment. Interestingly, in her view, the great suffering of God is primarily that of the Father who ...


2

Here is an early writing which may have been part of what influenced Bonhoeffer in the direction of cruciform theodicy. It comes as part of a letter from Ambrose of Milan to the Christian congregation at Vercellae in 396 AD. In staunch opposition to Epicurean Philosophy (from whence comes the Problem of Evil in it's original formulation) Ambrose points out ...


2

I would like to add to the list of very clear indications of the Bible's position on free will. The observation comes from this verse: He that loveth not knoweth not God; for God is love. (1 John 4:8, King James Version) "He that loveth not" speaks of a choice that we make. The act of love is a choice. Love requires free will to exist. Without free ...


2

There are a number of practical reasons why the original texts - the very first copies that were written down by the original bible writers - would not have survived, as well as some scriptural reasons why they perhaps didn't need to. Hebrews 4:12 says that "the word of God is alive and active", so God's word is not confined to the page. Your cited ...


1

Were Esau and Pharaoh judged by God without consideration of their deeds? Esau God's words, "Esau have I hated," appear in Malachi 1:3, and were written literally centuries after Esau lived. The Greek word Paul used for "hated" in Romans 9:13 [G3404, Strong's] means what we typically consider when we think of "hate." God's ...


1

why do we come to say that he is God simply like that if he could also be a lunatic or something worse?  Lewis, at this point in the book, is arguing against a specific view of Jesus - namely that he was a wise man, a good man, a great teacher - but not God! It's a widely held view among people who haven't looked closely at the Gospels, and it's a ...


1

The last thing we need is more theories. We don't have to ask 'why didn't Jesus arrive with Adam?'. Rather why was the model of the garden based on two trees with opposing results, and why was the 'serpent' in the midst of this garden with the opportunity to maximise the potential of one tree in particular? Clearly God had in mind for man a process of ...


1

If God is all-knowing, and is all powerful, what are some theories as to why He didn't send Jesus on Day One? The short answer is that God willed it so! Sure God could have chosen a million and one other solutions to this question, but he did not. For example: Would Jesus Have Come If Adam Had Not Sinned? Why Did He Wait So Long Before Coming? The following ...


1

The OP ideas of injustice and whimsical mercy are unfounded and show a perspective often spoken of when one misunderstands God's plan for man. God is love 1 John 4:16 and He has no evil within Him. But in His wisdom, He allows evil to intersect creation for a time to perfect us. Through the interaction of evil and the resistance thereof, Jesus was also ...


1

Were there previous Christian writers, prior to [Dietrich Bonhoeffer (4 February 1906 – 9 April 1945) who claimed that Christ's suffering on the Cross contains the answer to the problem of evil? A little clarity is in order first. The Wikipedia article on the Problem of evil does not cite Dietrich Bonhoeffer as the originator of "cruciform theodicy". ...


1

The best possible answer to this, in my opinion, is none but the one given in the Catechism of the Catholic Church, under the heading "Providence and the scandal of Evil". I quote in extenso: 309 If God the Father almighty, the Creator of the ordered and good world, cares for all his creatures, why does evil exist? To this question, as pressing as it is ...


1

As you defined free will or the ability to choose, begins in the garden of Eden. God gave it to mankind when he told Adam; (All Scripture is quoted from the King James Version) Genesis 2:16 and 17  And the LORD God commanded the man, saying, Of every tree of the garden thou mayest freely eat: But of the tree of the knowledge of good and evil, thou shalt ...


1

Good evening, I have broken your question down and cited the relevant scriptural response. What is the biblical basis that such a logical problem exists? The bible acknowledges that the world is currently under the power of the evil one thus raising the question of why is evil granted any power?: 19 We know that we are God’s children, and that the ...


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