50

The context of Matthew is adultery--relations with a woman who is not your wife. The context of Proverbs is marriage--relations with the woman who is your wife. The difference is quite substantial. “You have heard that it was said, ‘You shall not commit adultery.’ 28 But I say to you that everyone who looks at a woman with lustful intent has already ...


34

Answers in Genesis, an Apologetics site dedicated to defending the Bible as inerrant, gives five "reasonable" possibilities: Bear in mind that the real answer is, "we don't know for sure", and we can't answer what did happen. The best we can do is offer plausible explanations of what might have happened. Typically this is done using common rules behind ...


25

The term "Jew" is an Anglicization of "Judean" which comes from the Greek Ἰουδαῖος (Ioudaios). Technically, it can simply be a regional distinction, that is someone who is from Judea. But it can of course represent one's ethnicity. Greek who happened to grow up in Judea would not have identified himself as a Judean. In the book of Esther, the Hebrew "...


17

First, understanding that this is not a site to learn about Truth, but rather to learn about Christianity - what the various teachings are from an academic perspective, the question "Which is true" is off-topic. However, we could take a couple of approaches that would be within the bounds of the site: Answering what various denominations believe about ...


17

"Jealousy" in colloquial English, means either (1) indignation in response to infidelity, or (2) covetousness of the belongings of others. We can immediately eliminate the second case, because God cannot be covetous; everything is his. (Psalm 50:12) “If I were hungry I would not tell you, for the world is Mine, and all it contains." This ...


14

The Bible in no place says that you can possibly pray too much. In fact, it says just the opposite. Not only in the passage in Luke, but also in 1 Thessalonialns 5:17, which says we should be praying continually. Like most "contradictions' this one is simple to resolve by showing that the problem arises from taking verses out of context. (See Rules ...


12

From a Trinitarian standpoint there is nothing to reconcile. As with most things, the answer is found in the context. The whole of John 1:18 reads: "No one has seen God at any time; the only begotten God who is in the bosom of the Father, He has explained Him." (NASB) The person John refers to here is the same one Jesus exclaims in John 6:46: "Not that ...


11

In verse 49, as you have quoted it, this fellow is casting out demons in Jesus' name. As such, Jesus is still the one and only Way. Jesus' point here is not that there is another name under heaven by which men can be saved, but rather that just because someone is 'not part of the group' doesn't mean they can't be a follower of Christ. In other words, it ...


11

My response comes from this article about OT prophecy about Jesus from Nazareth. It basically states that there is no direct Old-Testament reference to Nazareth. The article postulates two explanations: 1) It was a reference that Jesus would be despised. He says 'prophets,' plural. It could be that Matthew was referring to several Old Testament ...


11

The phrase is part of a couplet, so it needs to be read in that context. Lead us not into temptation, but deliver us from evil. The phrase does not assume that God might lead us into temptation. Instead, it assumes that God does deliver us from evil. The couplet gives the impression that temptations will come, but prays that God delivers us from them. ...


11

By the time of the New Testament "Jew" and "Israelite" had effectively become synonyms. This is because the large majority of people who returned from the Exile were from the former Kingdom of Judah. So Acts 21:29 is talking about his nationality, not his tribe.


10

The answer to your question is really quite simple. God said that what He created was very good indeed (or really good, or better than good) prior to the fall of man and woman. With the fall of our first parents, both they and the world they inhabited were spoiled permanently. Paul wrote that ". . . the creation was subjected to futility, not willingly,...


10

This scripture in Malachi 4:5-6 refers to John the Baptist, not Jesus. Luke 1:17 "And he [John the Baptist] will go on before the Lord, in the spirit and power of Elijah, to turn the hearts of the fathers to their children and the disobedient to the wisdom of the righteous–to make ready a people prepared for the Lord." Matthew 11:14 "And if you are ...


10

Christians who believe in the inerrancy or infallibility of the Bible argue that these two accounts are not contradictory: that Jesus met his followers in both Jerusalem and Galilee after his resurrection. Such an argument first requires establishing that there was a lengthy period of time between the resurrection and the ascension, and that Luke 24 is a ...


10

There are two common ways to explain this: The "third year" refers to the third year of Elijah's stay in Zarephath, following a stay of some months at the brook Cherith (Adam Clarke, Barnes, Haydock, Keil and Delitzsch) The "third year" refers to the time of Elijah's exile, which did not begin until the dry period had already been ...


10

The typical Calvinist response to this question is captured well by Wayne Grudem in his Systematic Theology: [1 Timothy 2:4 and 2 Peter 3:9] speak of God's revealed will (telling us what we should do), not his hidden will (his eternal plans for what will happen). The verses simply tell us that God invites and commands every person to repent and come to ...


9

The revelation of scripture which describes God as existing as one being, with three distinct persons, does not hinge on any particular verse, but is gradually revealed from Genesis to Revelation.  If 1 John was removed from the Bible it would have no impact on the concept of the Father, Son and Holy Spirit, as three distinct persons of the only God. The ...


9

The basic rules and assumptions are as follows: That we are defending the notion that the Bible is, indeed, inspired, and therefore inerrant and infallible. It cannot contain errors, and if a true contradiction is found, it is, by definition, an error. Either one is correct and the other is wrong, or they are both wrong. Either way, the Bible is no ...


9

Jesus' answer emphasizes what is more important. It is more important that a person hear the word of God and obey it than to be chosen by God for some special task. Not everyone will be chosen for a special position, but anyone can choose to obey God. Jesus puts things regarding (his own) family into perspective: they are not as important as seeking the ...


9

Hard Sayings of the Bible explains this simply: God's jealousy does not involve being suspicious or wrongfully envious of the success of others, or even mistrusting. When used of God, the word jealous refers to that quality of his character that demands exclusive devotion to all that is just, right and fair. Jealousy is the anger that God directs ...


8

It means that while the gospel state supersedes and makes the Mosaic Covenant obsolete, it does not do it by opposing it but by becoming the perfection and fulfillment of it. The ceremonial law was made obsolete by Christ as he was what all the sacrifices pointed to. The civil law was made obsolete as the kingdom was no longer a physical Israel but an ...


8

The focus of this invective isn't so much on the genealogies themselves as it is the way in which people use them to puff them themselves up. Even barring earthly lineages, the poor of the church of Corinth managed to put themselves into faction. In 1 Corinthians 3, Paul writes: Brothers and sisters, I could not address you as people who live by the Spirit ...


8

I have of late taught that "wisdom" in the book of Proverbs is best understood as the understanding of God's ways or will and the application of such. In other words, acting and behaving in the manner which God intends for us. "Knowledge" can be understood in a similar fashion. This interpretation of wisdom, in my opinion, can be applied to all instances ...


8

tl;dr> Why was it recorded like that? because the story is making a theological point, not a legal one Is this the norm or the exception? the exact particulars of Boaz are exception, but it is based on a normal practice Is there any other recorded incident in the Scriptures where this was done and the lineage was accorded to the deceased person? Yes, ...


8

Unlike envy, which is the desire for things you do not rightfully possess, jealousy is the fierce protection of that which is rightfully yours. As such, the premise that jealousy is inherently sinful in your comparison is not accurate. Consider the case of Phinehas: 1 While Israel lived in Shittim, the people began to whore with the daughters of Moab. ...


7

The supposed inconsistency here is clearly that some passages say it's OK to eat anything, but that in Acts 2:15, James judges that non-Jewish Christians should be "not troubled" with the Law except as follows: 19 “Therefore it is my judgment that we do not trouble those who are turning to God from among the Gentiles, 20 but that we write to them that ...


7

The common understanding of this apparent conflict is that the two verses describe two situations. One involves answering foolish questions... The ones that are so foolish they don't deserve an answer. The ones that people ask to get a rise out of you, or make a point, when there's no real possibility of an intelligent conversation. The kind we quickly ...


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