13

Why did Joseph Smith change those verses? For clarity. The December 1983 edition of the LDS-published Ensign magazine included the article Understanding Textual Changes in the Book of Mormon. The article addresses several types of changes including the specific ones asked about by the OP. In a few places, however, Joseph Smith did intentionally add to ...


11

The authenticity of the Johannine comma, found in 1 John 5:7, has been a subject of debate from the early sixteenth century. Wikipedia says the general consensus today is that the passage is a Latin corruption that entered the Greek manuscript tradition in subsequent copies. By the way, the Johannine Comma is not to be confused with the modern punctuation ...


8

I've seen three major categories of criticism for the NIV, but often people will combine two or three of them. 1. Text criticism: the NIV is based on critical texts The NIV is a translation of the Nestle-Aland critical text of the Greek New Testament. It also critically evaluates the BHS for the OT, and often takes the Greek Septuagint as being a more ...


7

I mean no offense, but as the comments following the question above attest, the OP’s real purpose is to find a refutation to a scholarly argument he hasn’t yet read and doesn’t fully understand or appreciate. Attempts to make the question suitable to this site forced the OP to focus on a single thin example of Dr. Ehrman’s work, undocumented and barely ...


7

The Greek spells out each word: ἑξακόσιοι (six hundred) ἑξήκοντα (sixty) ἕξ (six). At the time the NT was written, place holders were unknown. It was simply not possible to write ἕξ ἕξ ἕξ (or to use the single letters for six which would be three stigmas) and it be understood as six hundred sixty-six. To write out 666 using the letter equivalents would ...


7

Chapter 1 Section VIII of the Westminster Confession states that it is both the Hebrew (O.T.) and the Greek (N.T.) texts in their original languages that the Westminster Divines said were “immediately inspired of God”, being authentic and “kept pure in all ages by God’s singular care and providence.” Christians were to translate them “into the vulgar ...


6

From the King James: Here is wisdom. Let him that hath understanding count the number of the beast: for it is the number of a man; and his number is Six hundred threescore and six. Six hundred is obvious.. Threescore - A "Score" is twenty, so that's sixty And sis So, the correct answer, according to that version, is your first: 600+60+6 (six ...


6

Since you didn't specify which perspective you're looking for (other than the view of skeptics, which is off-topic considering this site is meant to cover what Christian groups teach), I'm going to provide an answer from a Fundamentalist view - one that holds Scripture to be inspired, inerrant, and infallible. Before doing so, I need to point out, however, ...


6

Scriptures below are quoted from the King James Bible, which is based on the Textus Receptus. The main arguments I am aware of can be grouped into the following categories. Many witnesses It is a principle first found in the law that you need at least two witnesses to establish the truth. (Deuteronomy 17:6; 19:15) 2 Corinthians 13:1 This is the third time I ...


6

Perhaps, some may agree with this (theophany). However, another way of looking at this passage in Hebrews is that the author is discussing an order or priestly appointment (precedent) without lineal descent. Just as Melchizedek had no known lineage (some Jewish commentators have written about traditions that Shem, Noah's son is Melchizedek, though this is ...


6

As noted in the OP, this is a very extensive subject. I'll offer a very high-level overview of key points, and then drill down specifically on one example. Scriptural teachings The most well-known passages that form the basis of Latter-day Saint teachings on imperfections in the Bible are: ...because of the many plain and precious things which have been ...


5

Both "majority opinion" and "evangelical" (even with the guidelines you supplied) are slippery terms. They'll probably always be in a state of flux, so it's difficult to supply exactly what you've asked for. But don't panic. I think a relatively clear picture can still emerge. I've decided to give a sampling of three scholars who I think are firmly within ...


5

Wilbur Pickering effectively revived the scholarly debate on which text to use when he published The Identity of the New Testament Text in 1977. The third edition of his book on the subject can be viewed online here. His argument is almost entirely technical in nature. However in his conclusion, he states: God’s concern for the preservation of the ...


5

The above resources are indeed excellent surveys of the issues surrounding textual criticism of the bible. A couple of extra points are worth noting: (1) The question asks about the textual history of the Bible. The Greek manuscript families relate specifically to the New Testament. If the question includes the Old Testament that would need to be looked at ...


5

How many early New Testament manuscripts do we have? You ask about the first four centuries, until about 400 AD. I am inclined to initially answer through 300 AD, because I believe that period is more important for historical* reasons. This page on Wikipedia lists the 130 papyri of the New Testament that we know of, together with what content each has. For ...


5

First, I’d like to give a bit of background on the different OT manuscripts. The OT in English Bibles is almost always based off the Masoretic text and the Dead Sea Scrolls, but some use the Septuagint. The KJV uses the Masoretic. There are some discrepancies between the Septuagint and the Masoretic; nineteen times out of twenty, the Dead Sea Scrolls agree ...


5

Perhaps another way to answer the OP is to say that it is based on a false contrast. As an analogy, consider the following sentences: Jazz is the best kind of music and country is the best kind of music. Jazz is the best kind of music and the trumpet is the best instrument. In the first sentence there is a contradiction because the contradictory ...


5

The alteration, omission and addition of words in the Greek text is being highlighted by that site. They are comparing the Textus Receptus, the 'Received Text' (on which the KJV is based) to the Westcott & Hort/Nestle Aland Greek text (on which the ESV is based). Scrivener's text of 1881 shows clearly the differences between the two Greek texts. The ...


4

This article directly addresses Ehrmann's claims: https://www.str.org/w/textual-variants-it-s-the-nature-not-the-number-that-matters The author categorizes the approximately 400,000 textual variations as meaningful or meaningless viable or not viable Meaningless changes (like misspelled words) are irrelevant and easily spotted by a Greek scholar. They do ...


4

Inerrantists do not view the Masoretic text as inerrant in itself, but they consider it highly reliable. John Wenham, in Christ and the Bible (170ff.), outlines a variety of evidence for its faithful transmission of the original, all the while implying its imperfection: It was well known that the copying of the Scriptures had been carried out with almost ...


4

To be honest, I'm not sure what leads you to ask the question. Almost all Christians and almost all Christian denominations/movements have a positive view of textual criticism. The facts are that humans are fallible document copiers, and we therefore have thousands of manuscripts with minor differences. And as much as classicists and historians value the ...


4

Background We need to read the Westminster Confession of Faith document & Catechism in the proper historical context (1647), which is partly a reaction to the Roman Catholic Council of Trent Decrees (1564) & Catechism (1566), where each side (Protestants and Catholics) claimed authority to teach the faith for their respective adherents, including ...


3

Scripture is inerrant. Man is not. The Bible needs to be interpreted. Even a translation is an interpretation, because the translator needs to decide what a passage means in order to put it into another language to be read at a different point in history. It is also necessary to determine whether transcription errors have crept in over time. The Catholic ...


3

The simple answer is that there are some older manuscripts that lack the reading. If credence is placed in the older manuscript, then the reading is left out. The assumption is that the older manuscripts are closer to the source documents. By the way, many view the New World Translation with suspicion. It is a product of the Watch Tower Bible and Tract ...


3

The King James Version is a variety of the Textus Receptus. The translators who produced the King James Version relied mainly on the later editions of Beza's Greek New Testament, especially his 4th edition (1588-9). But they also frequently consulted the editions of Erasmus and Stephanus and the Complutensian Polyglot. According to Scrivener (1884), out ...


3

The NIV translation was carried out and overseen by a self-governing Committee of fifteen members called 'The Committee on Bible Translation'. The document called 'The NIV Commitee on Bible Translation' contains the names of the Committee for the initial stages of the translation (1965 - 1983). It also lists six de facto additional members (1976-1978) ...


3

According to this data, 96.7% of the Gospel of John is quoted pre Nicea 325. It is the most complete quoted New Testament book and only less than 29 Verses are not quoted. The document also has a section covering the Manuscripts. Manuscripts pre-dating Nicea covers 98.6% of John. I've not verified the whole document myself (that would rightly mentioned take ...


2

I can think of one example. Matthew 21:16 (KJV) And said unto him, Hearest thou what these say? And Jesus saith unto them, Yea; have ye never read, Out of the mouth of babes and sucklings thou hast perfected praise? Psalm 8:2 (KJV/following Masoretic) Out of the mouth of babes and sucklings hast thou ordained strength because of thine ...


2

This question on the English Language Stack Exchange site talks about the Multiple Quotation Rule. When a speech goes over more than one paragraph then the opening quotation marks are repeated at the beginning of each paragraph, with closing marks placed only at the end of the speech. This is not a rule universally followed but is followed here in the ...


Only top voted, non community-wiki answers of a minimum length are eligible