21

The reason is that "Jehovah" (or any transliteration) does belong there, and in these specific cases, the replacement would sound strikingly incorrect. Exo 6:3: And I appeared unto Abraham, unto Isaac, and unto Jacob, but the Name of God Almighty, but by my name LORD was I not knowen to them If both occurences were to be understood as "title&...


12

For the Catholic Church and other Nicene churches (the Eastern Orthodox, the Oriental Orthodox, the Armenian Orthodox, the Assyrians; as well as the majority of Protestants), the divine name YHWH (which is closely linked to the expression “I am” or “I Am Who I Am” (see Ex. 3:14), applies to God in His divine nature—hence to all three Persons of the Trinity. ...


7

Here is a basic answer: In Exodus 3:14, אֶֽהְיֶה (eh-yeh, a form of the Hebrew verb "to be") is used as part of what today would be considered a folk etymology of the most sacred Hebrew name of God, called the "Tetragrammaton": יהוה as it appears in the original unpointed (no vowels) Hebrew manuscripts. Eh-yeh is not itself the commonly used name for God in ...


6

The divine name (tetragrammaton: JHVH) applies also to the incarnate God, Jesus Christ. The prophets clearly state that the Messias is God. Isaias says: "God Himself will come and will save you" (35:4); "Make ready the way of Jahweh" (40:3); "Lo Adonai Jahweh will come with strength" (40:10). That Jahweh here is Jesus Christ is ...


6

The Tetragrammaton ('Hashem', The Name) was written many times in the Hebrew Scriptures without vowels, therefore YHWH could not be pronounced by anyone without knowledge of the vowel points. Nor was it encouraged, out of concern not to break the second of the Ten Commandments. When it came to the Christian Scriptures, they were originally written in koine ...


6

Tradition holds that Moses lived sometime around the 15th century B.C. This would put the oldest use of the tetragrammaton (the Hebrew word "YHWH", anglicized to "Yahweh") to the same time frame, as Moses wrote the oldest portions of the Bible. Outside the Bible, the oldest known inscription of the tetragrammaton appears on the Mesha stele, which has been ...


6

When God commissioned Moses from the burning bush in the wilderness, when Moses asked God his name he was given the name of Yahweh, Exodus 3:13-14: And Moses said unto God, Behold, when I come unto the children of Israel, and shall say to them, The God of your fathers has sent me to you; and they shall say to me, What is his name? what shall I say to them? ...


5

He discusses the tetragrammaton at several places in the grammar.1 In §102m he includes the vowel pointing patach-šĕwă-sĕgōl that leads to our English “Yahweh”. That is: יַהְוֶה‎. Elsewhere throughout the grammar he either uses the unpointed יהוה or the Masoretic יְהוָֹה (šĕwă'-ḥōlem-qāmeṣ; that is, the vowels of אֲדֹנָי ʾădōnāy 2). The relationship between ...


5

To be clear, Christians do use other names of God in some contexts. Michael Card's song El Shaddai was wildly popular in the 80's, and is often credited with launching the career of Amy Grant. I remember singing Jehovah Jireh, and dozens of other songs like that. Kay Arthur has a popular study based on the names of God, directed especially at women. That ...


5

In John 8:58, Jesus says to the Pharisees, "Before Abraham was, I am". He was pointedly using the same language that God himself used when speaking to Moses in Exodus 3:14, and the Pharisees understood clearly that Jesus was claiming to be God. That's why they tried to stone him for blasphemy.


5

Isaiah 44:6 “Thus says the Lord, the King of Israel, And his Redeemer, the Lord of hosts: ‘I am the First and I am the Last; Besides Me there is no God. Revelation 22:13 I am the Alpha and the Omega, the Beginning and the End, the First and the Last.” Jesus = THE first and last (true) Yahweh = THE first and last (true) Jesus = Yahweh (true) (two ...


5

This is correct, and easily supported by the Bible, particularly the writings of John. John chapter 1 states that "all things were made by him; and without him was not any thing made that was made." So we see that Jehovah, the creator of the world, is Jesus. In John 14:6, Jesus says that "no man cometh unto the Father but by me," and 1 John 2: 1 calls Jesus ...


5

Here is an answer from a Jewish perspective. The Bible calls G-d Y-h-v-h, which is called “the Tetragrammaton,” which means a four-letter word. While the Tetragrammaton appears on Torah scrolls, even today, Jews say it as Adonai whenever they read the Torah (more on that later). Many think that this is the name of G-d in the Hebrew Bible, but this is not ...


4

In Aramaic, Jesus Christ addresses God as MarYA. In Aramaic Peshitta (Aramaic NT), you will see Jesus Christ saying MarYA several times. "YA" (Yodh Alap) is Aramaic form of Hebrew "YH" in "YHWH." MarYA means "Master YA" in English. Aramaic was the spoken language of first century Israel. So they used MarYA to address God. So the names will also get changed ...


4

A very long time ago, the Church decided that it was important for people to hear the gospel in their own language. That's at the core of why the New Testament was written in Greek and not in Hebrew. The earliest churches used the common languages of the day. The Roman Catholic church picked up Latin along the way and it's still their official language. For ...


4

The answers to the O.P.'s questions are simple: No, the pronunciation of a word would not enter in any meaningful way into the contents of the faith. Faith has to do with God and those truths revealed by Him. (See Catechism of the Catholic Church no. 156.) The revelation of God as “I Am Who Am” (see Ex. 3:14), which is deeply linked to the Tetragrammaton, ...


4

Although specifically not forbidden from saying it, Catholics are not supposed to use the the name of God in their Liturgy: Avoiding pronouncing the tetragrammaton of the name of God on the part of the Church has therefore its own grounds. Apart from a motive of a purely philological order, there is also that of remaining faithful to the Church's tradition, ...


4

In a tomb at Ketef Hinnom in Israel, the oldest text of the Hebrew Bible was discovered. The text, inscribed on a silver scroll in the old Hebrew script dating to the 7th Century B.C., is the Aaronic blessing (Numbers 6:24-26), which begins, "yeverekh'kha YHWH Vayishmarekha" (May Yahweh bless you and keep you). Source: http://ancient-hebrew.org/...


4

Using the word ‘bowdlerize’ gives a misleading impression, that only a very few Bibles retain an English rendition of the Divine Name; that the vast majority have expunged this word, that is, erased and omitted it from the Bible. If that was the case, then the Authorised Version and very many more recent translations would have failed to include the ...


4

The answer is 'No'. In the beginning God (Elohim) made the heavens and the earth. [Genesis 1:1] And : ... the LORD God (Jehovah Elohim) made the earth and the heavens. [Genesis 2:4] [KJV] God made the moon, ergo he is before it was made and before it was even seen by humanity and before mankind could, insanely, idolise the thing. He revealed himself to ...


4

Jehovah's Witnesses use whatever form of God's name that is common to Bibles in each language. In modern Hebrew, Jehovah's Witnesses use the "Yahweh" pronunciation. In English, the most common pronunciation is Jehovah. This pronunciation has been used for centuries in English and can be traced back to the Tyndale Bible, the first Bible in English ...


3

Short answer: - because we cannot be sure about correct pronunciation. Longer answer: Biblical hebrew language is quite peculiar, i.e. most vovels are not written which makes pronounciation ambiguous: "The letters YHWH are consonantal semi-vowels. In unpointed Biblical Hebrew, most vowels are not written and the rest are written only ambiguously, as ...


3

Some Christians regularly do use the "name" of God. Notably, the Jehovah's Witnesses call God "Jehovah", which is the name God gave himself on the Mountain when talking to Moses. I've also met plenty of non-denominational Christians that regularly call God "Yahweh", and it is in some of their music too; they certainly don't shy away from it. Also, most ...


3

Modern Hebrew uses a 'V' sound and the letter is called vav. In early, biblical Hebrew, it appears that the same letter was pronounced 'W'. To avoid confusion, many (but not all) linguists refer to the letter as waw when used in biblical Hebrew. So, YHVH and YHWH are both correct, but YHWH is generally preferred for biblical references. It did have a ...


3

Not necessarily. Like most fine theological distinctions, the Church has never taken an official position on this. The Lord's revelations are focused on His work of salvation and not on clarifying things for our systematic categorization, and we avoid officially affixing our own human interpretations by creed or catechism. Latter-day Saints do believe the ...


2

Per John 1, "In the beginning was the Word and the Word was with God and the Word was God....and the Word was made flesh. Per John 14:6, "No one comes to the Father except through me (Jesus)." Abraham was saved by Faith as per Genesis 15:4 & 6, "And behold, the word of the LORD came to him".."And he (Abraham) believed the LORD and he counted it to him ...


2

To answer this question we must recall two statements by Jesus in his High Priestly Prayer: "I revealed your Name to the men whom You have given Me out of the world." (Jn 17:6) "And I made known to them your Name, and will make it known, so that the Love with which You loved Me may be in them, and I in them." (Jn 17:26) Now, in what sense did ...


2

I couldn't find anywhere that any KJV translators spoke about their decision to translate the Tetragrammaton as "Lord." Not the preface, not the marginal notes, and I couldn't find any quotes from any of them on it (I wasn't too thorough in my search on the last one, so they could be out there somewhere). The KJV draws significantly from Tyndale's earlier ...


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