11

The phrase is part of a couplet, so it needs to be read in that context. Lead us not into temptation, but deliver us from evil. The phrase does not assume that God might lead us into temptation. Instead, it assumes that God does deliver us from evil. The couplet gives the impression that temptations will come, but prays that God delivers us from them. ...


11

This is sort of a combination and customization of several commentaries I perused on the subject, being curious myself. As I am not directly copying any one of them I am not adding individual quotes. The two that most influenced my opinion here is Edersheim and someone called Arthur Sloman. If you read the verses carefully you will notice Luke does not ...


8

For people who believe in Jesus and not the devil, what happend in the desert? There are Christians who believe in Jesus, but not in a personal Devil. For example: the Christadelphians. Devil Christadelphians believe that the Satan or Devil is not an independent spiritual being or fallen angel. Devil is viewed as the general principle of evil and ...


6

No, God does not. In hebrew the word there is נָסָה the KJV translates it as "tempt", but strong's translates it as "to test". In fact if you check out other translations you'll find thats how they translate it as well. So what was God doing in Genesis 22? Was he tempting Abraham or testing him? Reading on in the chapter God makes it ...


6

Frankly, according to the Bible Christians are NOT stronger than Satan, and that is not because he is a spiritual being and they are physical/spiritual beings. If anything, having bodies makes Christians more vulnerable to his attacks, not less. As the apostle Paul observed, our bodies have "members," and since our members war against each other (...


6

This is admittedly a difficult problem that Reformed theologians have addressed in several different, though related, ways. Louis Berkhof mentions several approches to reconcile the "reality of the temptations of Jesus" with the idea that he could not sin: that in the human nature of Christ, as in that of the first Adam, there was the nuda ...


5

Many people do not realize that believers and non-believers alike receive a default protection from God. They have a "hedge" around them similar to the hedge described as around Job. If it were not so, Satan and his evil spirits would do be able to do as they please. "Have you not put a hedge around him and his household and everything he has?" (Job 1:10) ...


4

I love Acts 5 (verse 3): Then Peter said, “Ananias, how is it that Satan has so filled your heart that you have lied to the Holy Spirit and have kept for yourself some of the money you received for the land? ... Peter clearly implies agency of Satan here, and apparently, Ananias and Sapphira, while not necessarily believers, were held in that esteem ...


4

Here's the passage where Satan tempts Jesus in this way: Matthew 4:8-10 Again, the devil took him to a very high mountain and showed him all the kingdoms of the world and their glory. And he said to him, “All these I will give you, if you will fall down and worship me.” Then Jesus said to him, “Be gone, Satan! For it is written, “‘You shall worship the ...


4

TL:DR; Sleep does not cause temptation, prayer prevents it. How does sleep put the apostles into temptation? It doesn't. The most likely source of your question is that the cause and effect you attribute is a misunderstanding of the Scripture. On that scene in Matthew we can choose four insights of many, with sources and expanded discussion below. ...


4

There is a basic concept that you appear to be overlooking. Satan is eternal. God never totally destroys any of his creations, which have life given by him. He only destroys Heaven and Earth in Revelation Chapter 21 verse one. That Heaven that is destroyed is the heaven we know as our atmosphere. The Heaven we aspire to is eternal, and all things that were ...


4

The Bible tells us that after Jesus was baptised in the Jordan (Matthew 3:13) he was led by the Holy Spirit into the wilderness and fasted for forty days and nights. The purpose of this period of total fasting was to prepare him for the ministry that would change the world. Satan offered Jesus alternatives to God’s plan, compromises that would satisfy His ...


3

Good question. As it turns out, there isn't an official Catholic position. That is, the Catechism does not address the question of why temptation occurs. What follows is an argument combining the thinking of several different Catholic scholars. First, the definition of temptation is An attraction, either from outside oneself or from within, to act ...


3

The passage you're looking for can be found in in 1 Corinthians, chapter 10, verse 13: There hath no temptation taken you but such as is common to man: but God is faithful, who will not suffer you to be tempted above that ye are able; but will with the temptation also make a way to escape, that ye may be able to bear it. Its message is reinforced is 1 ...


3

This may be a simplistic answer, but it came as something of an "aha!" moment to me when I first heard it many years ago: In general, it is probably not the best idea to ask God to do something God doesn't want to do, or to ask God not to do something God does want to do. Presumably God's will and God's knowledge of the situation is better than ours. So if ...


3

To answer the question from a Jehovah's Witnesses perspective, this question was asked by a reader of the Watchtower, and it was answered in the following way in the March 2016 study edition of the Watchtower "Questions From Readers" section: Did Satan physically take Jesus to the temple when tempting him? Put simply, we cannot be certain whether ...


3

The word lead is nearly as unambiguous in Greek as it is in English - εἰσφέρω (eispherō) - and the word for temptation - πειρασμός (peirasmos) - can mean temptation towards evil, just as in English. It should be noted, though, that whereas in the preceding verse - forgive us our debts (Matthew 6:12), or forgive us our sins (Luke 11:4) - the Evangelists ...


3

According to Catholicism, did the Temptation(s) of Jesus take place on the same day? The Church has not made any pronouncements in one way or another. Many believe that the Temptations of Christ in the Desert were during the course of his fasting in the wilderness. However, St. Thomas Aquinas makes allusion that the Temptations of Christ were probably on ...


2

The argument comes both from the fact that Jesus was fully human, and from the Hebrews 4:15, which says (in the King James) For we have not an high priest which cannot be touched with the feeling of our infirmities; but was in all points tempted like as we are, yet without sin. This outlines the fact that even though Jesus is fully God, He was also ...


2

Simply put, he is the ruler of this earth and has great influence. Revelations mentions that he was casted out of heaven with his demons (fallen angels) and was bound to the earth. 1 John 5:19 states that the whole world is lying in the power of the wicked one, otherwise known as the Devil, Satan.


2

Some good points made so far. I'll just add this scripture. Submit yourselves therefore to God. Resist the devil, and he will flee from you. James 4:7 (KJV) Again, this doesn't mean that humans are naturally stronger, but that God has complete power over the devil. By putting our lives under God's power, we have the ability to drive the devil away.


2

The saints are in heaven, and presumably immune from temptation. They "are in glory, contemplating 'in full light, God himself, triune and one, exactly as he is.'" (CCC954) The angels "are personal and immortal creatures, surpassing in perfection all visible creatures, as the splendour of their glory bears witness." (CCC 330) Thus neither ...


2

Catholics believe in the four senses of Scripture and that all Scripture should be interpreted, firstly by the literal sense (not literalistic, as in every must be taken as having literally happened). Allegory is only one of the spiritual senses of Scripture. See the reference to the Catechism beginning in paragraph 101. You may want to continue reading ...


2

If God cannot tempt anyone, what is the meaning of the following scriptures? James 1:13 Let no man say when he is tempted, I am tempted of God: for God cannot be tempted with evil, neither tempteth he any man: 1 Kings 22:20-22 And the LORD said, Who shall persuade Ahab, that he may go up and fall at Ramothgilead? And one said on this manner, ...


2

I John 4:4 says " you belong to God..the Spirit who lives in you is greater than the spirit who lives in the world". Hope this helps!!


2

I upvoted rhetorician's answer because I think that is the answer. However, from you question it seems that you're probably looking for an LDS perspective specifically, so I have an answer from the Book of Mormon to add to what has been said already. As is stated in other answers, without yielding to the Holy Spirit, we are powerless to Satan even with a ...


2

There is a set number of hours in a day and one cannot pray all the prayers. I'd imagine it would be pretty hard for a Catholic layperson with a 40 hour work week to go to Mass, pray all the hours of the Divine Office, pray the rosary and do whatever seasonal novena or devotion comes up. So, one has to choose which prayers to pray in order to get through ...


1

The final "tempted" in James 1:13 means "test." (http://www.blueletterbible.org/lang/lexicon/lexicon.cfm?Strongs=G3985&t=ESV) It does not mean to lure someone to sin, which is the popular meaning of the word. None of the examples given are God luring people to sin against him.


Only top voted, non community-wiki answers of a minimum length are eligible