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16

It seems that there is an assumption in this question that suggests reason is preferable to judgment. Reason is appropriate when the problem is merely a misunderstanding, but judgment is appropriate when the problem is willful disobedience. It is likely that the place in the temple where the market had been set up was in the Court of the Gentiles. Thus, ...


14

The Wailing Wall was not part of the Temple - it was part of the Temple Mount - and a giant retaining wall for the courtyard on which the Temple sat. Here is a model of what we think it would have all looked like: Basically, when Herod restored the Second Temple, he couldn't expand the building itself, since it's dimensions were fixed by Scripture. He ...


12

When David provoked the anger of God by counting the fighting men in Israel, the punishment was so severe. Then God commanded David to build an altar on the threshing floor of Araunah the Jebusite (1 Chronicles 21) to pray to the LORD to have mercy on Israel. David called on the Lord, and the Lord answered him with fire from heaven on the altar of burnt ...


12

The Mystery of the Temple's 'Molten Metals' Two recent apologists told the story, apparently independently, of molten gold seeping between the temple`s foundation stones during the Siege of Jerusalem in 70 CE. Both implied the source was Josephus, but neither provided references. Unfortunately, both had theological motivations for adding these details to ...


12

From lds.org: What can I say to others about my experience in the temple? You can talk about what the interior of the temple looks like, and you can freely share the feelings you have in the temple. However, temple covenants and ordinances, including the words used, are too sacred to be discussed in detail outside the temple. By avoiding discussion of these ...


11

For one, there's the obvious reference/fulfillment (quoted in John 2:17): Psalm 69:9 (NASB) For zeal for Your house has consumed me, And the reproaches of those who reproach You have fallen on me. My first thought is that Jesus, knowing their hearts (Mt 9:4, Mt 12:25/Lk 11:17), might have known that reasoning with them wouldn't have worked. (e.g. Lk 16:...


11

The dating of the New Testament is a matter of some controversy, so there is no consensus answer to the question of which ones were written after the destruction of the temple. (The Old Testament books were of course written well before). No New testament documents make clear reference to the destruction of the temple. Some appear to prophecy the ...


11

It means it took that long to build. This is apparent from the fact that they were challenging Christ's claim that He would build it in three days, when it's taken 46 years of work thus far. From Barnes' Notes on the Bible Forty and six years ... - The temple in which they then were was that which was commonly called "the second temple," built after ...


10

As others have noted, dates of the writing of New Testament books are disputed. Let me use F. F. Bruce's "The New Testament Documents" as my major source here. This page -- http://www.freebeginning.com/new_testament_dates/ -- also gives dates, though some of these are rather earlier than the dates I've usually heard. Without getting into all the arguments ...


10

The Holy of Holies, or the Most Holy Place, was separated from the outter room (the Holy Place) by the veil. Only the High Priest could go beyond the veil into the Most Holy Place, but other priests could enter the Holy Place. Thus any priest at the Temple would have been able to see it. The non-priest Levites may have also been able to enter the Holy Place ...


9

The first part of The Gospel of James, an apocryphal Gospel "contains the story of the unique birth of Mary to Anna and her childhood and dedication to the temple". Similarly The Gospel of Pseudo-Matthew confirms "Mary entering service as a temple virgin". David Hughes gives a fascinating historical background on this subject where he ...


8

The obvious answer to the question is yes, the first Temple was built on Mount Moriah. II Chronicles 3:1 says as much: Then Solomon began to build the house of the LORD in Jerusalem on Mount Moriah, where the LORD had appeared to David his father, at the place that David had appointed, on the threshing floor of Ornan the Jebusite. (ESV) and there is no ...


7

We often bring our own compromised perspectives to Bible texts and as a result struggle to understand the simplistic significance of a moment. Isaiah 56:7 these I will bring to my holy mountain and give them joy in my house of prayer. Their burnt offerings and sacrifices will be accepted on my altar; for my house will be called a house of prayer for all ...


7

The relationship is perhaps best explained by theNew York Times article to which you refer: Scholars say that the Universal Church’s promotion of Jewish symbolism in its replica of Solomon’s Temple stems from a quest for historical legitimacy in a church that is just 37 years old. In other words, the symbolism of the Solomon’s Temple replica is a stunt ...


7

Mary and Joseph must be sealed by proper authority (a Melchizedek priesthood holder with the authorization to perform the sealing) in order to receive the blessings of the sealing ordinance, including inheriting the highest degree of Celestial glory. This is true for all of God's children. I doubt an exception would be made for them. What we do not know ...


6

If I read this passage in the Book of Exodus correctly, the presence of God was not connected to the Temple, but rather to the Mercy seat, which appears to be the top of the Ark of the Covenant. All Scripture is quoted from the King James translation. Exodus 25:10 through 22And they shall make an ark of shittim wood: two cubits and a half shall be the ...


6

The temple in Jerusalem was destroyed in AD 70. Acts 2 records how Holy Spirit was poured down on the Day of Pentecost (v 1-4). And then Peter addressed the crowd who were amazed and confused what was going on. Most of them were Jews who came to Jerusalem for the Pentecost festival (v 5). Following Peter's sermon, 3000 were baptized that day (v 41). From ...


6

There are a few things to consider. First of all, the Jewish Ceremonial and Civil Laws have no bearing on US today. For example, i live in the U.S. and am a gentile christian. Therefore the laws of Israel, and the regulations of Judaism have no bindings on me. These people were still living in Israel, and were commanded by Jesus to follow the laws of the ...


5

Moriah is specifically named in the Isaac narrative and the temple narrative. Mount Moriah itself is said to be the location of the temple: Then Solomon began to build the house of the LORD in Jerusalem on Mount Moriah, where the LORD had appeared to David his father, at the place that David had appointed, on the threshing floor of Ornan the Jebusite. 2 ...


5

Did the Herodian Temple have virgins? The answer is almost certainly no. The only real support for Jewish temple virgins is found in Roman Catholic writings in support of the Catholic doctrine of the perpetual virginity of Mary. This doctrine has no basis in the canonical scriptures, but only in non-canonical early writings, most of which were influenced ...


5

Were there female priests in the temple in Jerusalem at any time? Definitely, Yes! Certainly the ‘priestly code’ of early Judaism assigned the duties associated with the korbanot (‘sacrifical offerings’) only to the kohanim (‘priests’) who were specifically sons of Aaron (Ex.40:13-15). The priestly function also included other temple responsibilities, ...


5

No, incense is not burned in LDS temples. In the temple at Jerusalem, and in some traditional Christian liturgy (such as the Catholic mass), burning incense is used as a symbol for prayer, which ascends to heaven and is pleasing to God. It is also a symbol of the Savior Jesus Christ. As part of the LDS temple ceremony, participants gather around a table ...


5

It was the custom of Jesus to go to a house of worship each Sabbath Day and in some instances teach. One of these times was recorded in Luke 4: 16 So He came to Nazareth, where He had been brought up. And as His custom was, He went into the synagogue on the Sabbath day, and stood up to read. 17 And He was handed the book of the prophet Isaiah. And ...


5

The tradition of giving half-a shekel to the Temple of God dates back to the times of the book of Exodus, as we see at Exodus 30:11-13 (RSVCE): The Lord said to Moses, “When you take the census of the people of Israel, then each shall give a ransom for himself to the Lord when you number them, that there be no plague among them when you number them. Each ...


4

Raymond E. Brown says in An Introduction to the New Testament, page 164, there is wide scholarly agreement that Mark's Gospel was written in the late 60s or just after 70, and therefore the destruction of the temple was imminent or had already occurred. Burton L. Mack goes as far as to say, in Who Wrote the New Testament, page 152, it would not have made ...


4

2 Chronicles 5:13-14. The Glory of God Fills the Temple: In unison when the trumpeters and the singers were to make themselves heard with one voice to praise and to glorify the LORD, and when they lifted up their voice accompanied by trumpets and cymbals and instruments of music, and when they praised the LORD saying,"He indeed is good for His ...


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