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A number of different answers to this question have been given by Christians through history. Broadly speaking, the reasons for the extensive detail given by Moses might be categorized as follows: (1) to foreshadow future events and entities, (2) to demonstrate the importance of religious worship, and (3) to display God's glory. Foreshadowing Christians ...


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According to the NT, the tabernacle serves as a symbol of the heavenly one. Heb 8:5, Heb 9:9, Heb 9:23-24, Heb 10:1; Col 2:17 Spiritually speaking, Christ spoke of His body as the temple (John 2:21). Paul spoke of the church as the body of Christ (1 Co 12:27). Jesus is the "way" and the "image" of God (John 14:6, Col 1:15). God created them male and female ...


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Constable quotes Youngblood in this regard, here [Youngblood, Ronald F. Exodus. Everyman’s Bible Commentary series. Chicago: Moody Press, 1983, p.128]The "popular Jewish interpretation" regarding the rope may or may not have any validity--the thought being that if the priest were to stop moving about for a long time, the bells would be silent and the silence ...


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I think if you read Acts 15:15 you'll see James' perspective on the fulfillment of this prophecy. Acts 15:15 And this conversion of Gentiles is exactly what the prophets predicted. As it is written: So read together I think we can make some logical conclusions. Acts 15:15-18 15 And this conversion of Gentiles is exactly what the ...


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The altar was quite large. Here are some illustrations of Solomon's temple that take biblical and historic record into account: Image sources: https://dwellingintheword.files.wordpress.com/2011/06/templebronzealtar.jpg http://www.katehetski-nadbiskupija-split.net/wp-content/uploads/2015/07/salomonov-hram.jpg http://www.crystalinks.com/solomon_temple.jpg ...


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This answer will draw on two published Christian commentaries on the construction of the Tabernacle: The anonymous book of Hebrews (traditionally attributed to Paul) in the New Testament, a first century Christian work, which provides a broad-strokes exposition of the Tabernacle as referring to heaven and Christ's work there. Arcana Coelestia ("Secrets of ...


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If Exodus 25-27 is a literal, eyewitness report of what Moses was told by God to do, then this must remain a mystery. However, the Documentary Hypothesis holds that the Book of Exodus was written over a period of centuries during the early to middle parts of the first millennium BCE. While the old Documentary Hypothesis is no longer seen as immutable, this ...


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A clue is to be found in 1 Samuel 1:9 where Eli the priest was sitting on a chair by the doorpost of the Lord's temple. Here is the comment from the NIV Study Bible: Here and in 1 Samuel 3:3 the central sanctuary, the tabernacle,is referred to as "the Lord's temple". It is also called "the house of the Lord" (v. 7; 3:15), "the Tent of Meeting" (2:22) and ...


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According to the details in Exodus 26:15-30, it seems like the overall structure of the Tabernacle of Moses was covered with a flat roof. Whether there was an inner curtain that formed a pointed ceiling underneath the flat roof (because a ceiling is found below a roof), I could not say. Both the NIV and ESV Study Bible diagrams show the Tabernacle Tent (...


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The pronoun "them" at the beginning of vs. 35 refers to Bezaleel and Aholiab. We have to stay with the scriptures immediately preceding: Ex. 35:30-35, "And Moses said unto the children of Israel, See, the Lord hath called by name Bezaleel the son of Uri, the son of Hur, of the tribe of Judah; 31 And he hath filled him with the spirit of God, in ...


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At first I thought definitely yes because I recalled hearing the same thing there were bells on the garment so that a priest In the holy compartment could hear that the high priest was moving about doing his duties on atonement day in the most holy part. If there was an extended time with no bells tinkling they would pull the rope around the high priest to ...


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