8

The tulip acronym stands for the following: Total depravity, the idea that man can do only evil without God. Unconditional election, the idea that the saved are chosen by God without any consideration for their actions. Limited atonement, the idea that Christ's death atones only for the sins of the elected saved. Irresistible grace, the idea that no one ...


6

The two terms are basically synonyms, but there are some differences. First, it's not merely a matter of "age." Karl Barth wrote Church Dogmatics in 1932, while Charles Hodge wrote Systematic Theology in 1872. On the other hand, there seems to be a geographical bias. Barth, Berkouwer, Heppe, Pieper, and Ott all wrote originally in German or Dutch, and ...


5

Depperm's answer is, I think, complete, which I know isn't very satisfying relative to the level of detail you put into your question. But really the sole foundation of Latter-day Saint doctrine is the word of God revealed in the scriptures and through the prophets (ancient and modern). This, coupled with the concept of an open canon, makes it difficult to ...


5

Biblical Theology studies the Bible focusing on how God progressively revealed truth in it. It looks at it in chronological order showing how each new text adds to the ones before, sometimes in obvious agreement, sometimes in seeming contradiction. For example, Biblical Theology is crucial to understand how Christians should relate to the Old Testament Law - ...


4

I'm pretty sure that there is no source that looks at only Jesus words. However there are certainly theological approaches that place a much greater emphasis on Jesus words. For a start you might want to look at Red Letter Christians, a group that attempts to redress what they see as an imbalance in North American Evangelicalism, which they believe has ...


4

In order to be Sovereign, God would have to be All-Powerful, or Omnipotent. That means God can do anything that pleases Him, but His actions will always be in accord with the rest of His character (Revelation 19:6; Jeremiah 32:17, 27). The word omnipotent comes from omni- meaning “all” and potent meaning “power.” To say God is All-Powerful is to say God ...


4

The Concise Oxford English Dictionary (11th ed.) defines "nature" as "the basic or inherent features, qualities, or character of a person or thing." For God to act against His nature would mean, employing the COED definition of "nature", that He would be exhibiting features, quality, or character that were not basic or inherent to Him. In essence, He would ...


4

This answer is drawn from material I received from Chris Engelsma. One question I didn't take into account at first was which of the four editions of the Loci Bavinck is thinking of; however, if we are to go with the 1521, the answer seems to be relatively clear. If we compare the TOC of the Loci with the TOC of Book I and Book II of the Sentences, there is ...


3

Read St. Thomas Aquinas, especially his Summa Theologica or his own briefer introductory summary of it, the Compendium Theologiæ. From Fr. Réginald Garrigou-Lagrange, O.P.'s Essence & Topicality of Thomism pt. 1, §2 "The Excellence of Thomism": St. Robert Bellarmine similarly speaks of St. Thomas in the introduction of his treatise on the Holy ...


3

Here's a definition of "biblical theology" from Wayne Grudem's popular Systematic Theology (pages 22-23): "Biblical theology" has a technical meaning in theological studies. [...] [It] gives special attention to the teachings of individual authors and sections of Scripture, and to the place of each teaching in the historical development of Scripture. So ...


3

Yes, this is the same as "systematic theology". Systematics looks at the Bible in a logical fashion, whereas biblical theology looks at the Bible in its revealed order and tries to make sense of the overarching flow and history of redemption. Many commentators believe that systematics has nothing to do with exegesis or biblical theology, but nothing could be ...


2

The following article was written by Donald Macleod, who is Professor of Systematic Theology at the Free Church of Scotland College in Edinburgh, Scotland. The article appeared in a communication I received from "Reformation 21" on October 5 of this year. I've been on their email list for awhile now, and their mini-monographs and book reviews are ...


2

I think the concept of systematic theology and biblical theology is deceptive.  I have studied both and I think I can strip away the confusion by providing a non academic answer that sort of throws the curtain in front of the wizard of Ozz to one side. Let me explain and hopefully this makes sense as I am going out on a branch a bit here with potential ...


2

The doctrine of penal substitutionary atonement does indeed rely heavily on the idea that Christ's death was vicarious, and thus sometimes vicarious atonement is closely associated with penal substitution. However, the adjective vicarious is applied to other theories as well, by both advocates and detractors of penal substitution. Thus, without context, ...


2

I believe that your question, although well intentioned, is irrelevant and unanswerable. II Peter 3:8 eludes to the truth of the matter: But do not overlook this one fact, beloved, that with the Lord one day is as a thousand years, and a thousand years as one day. God is outside of time. From our perspective he was, is, and will be, all at the same time, ...


2

While not really a systematic theology book, John Piper's What Jesus Demands from the World is predominantly based on the gospels. There is a free PDF on that page. The book's blurb is: The four Gospels are filled with demands from Jesus. These demands are Jesus’ way of showing us who he is and what he expects of us. They are not harsh demands originating ...


2

There are EPUBs (and some other formats) from here: God: His Knowability, Essence, and Attributes: A Dogmatic Treatise The Divine Trinity: A Dogmatic Treatise God the Author of Nature and the Supernatural: A Dogmatic Treatise Christology: A Dogmatic Treatise on the Incarnation Soteriology: A Dogmatic Treatise on the Redemption Mariology: A Dogmatic Treatise ...


2

In Catholicism, what can we do on earth to earn reward beyond eternal life? In order to increase our own personal merits before God, we must first of all be in the state of grace. If we are not in the state of grace, we are by default in the state of mortal sin. Simply by going to sacramental confession will restore us to God’s friendship and make us ...


2

Greater reward is acquired by more love. What actually earns us a reward? Love is that which earns us a reward. Heaven consists essentially of the beatific vision of God, ie. seeing God face to face. We can not do this in natural order by our own power, but grace is needed; so God gives divine light to us by which we are able to see God. Aquinas writes: ...


2

For a survey of Catholic theology, you'd be better off reading the current Catechism, which summarizes the body of beliefs from basics to the more detailed. There are foot notes a plenty that can point you to both scripture, and also philosophers/theologians for various tenets. (Plato) > Aristotle > Irenaeus > Augustine > Aquinas > Ratzinger That ...


2

The only appropriate source is a prophet called of God. The standard works and other authoritative writings on the theology of the church all have the same origin: they are the written words of prophets; documented prophecies. There is one thing we are taught about prophecies in the scriptures: 2 Peter 1:20–21 20 Knowing this first, that no prophecy of the ...


1

Scriptures Bible (as far as it is translated correctly) Book of Mormon Pearl of Great Price Doctrine and Covenants Prophets (past/present/future) General Conference Ensign/Liahona/New Era/Friend See also Approaching Mormon Doctrine


1

There is no surefire, mechanical, grammatical method, because Scripture was constructed so as to require patience, wisdom, personal holiness, the assistance of the Holy Spirit, and personal experience in order for one to understand it fully. Jesus spoke all these things to the crowd in parables; he did not say anything to them without using a parable. (...


1

God can do whatever he wills or wants to do . Anything and everything one could think of ! However, because everything possible is not included in his nature ( God telling a lie, to not be all loving , or limit himself to what he can see or do ...etc) , which means he would change in nature and subsequently we would change as well. Everything on earth and ...


1

Short answer: D.A. Carson offered a concise comparison within a larger article on the connection between Biblical and other kinds of theologies. Quote: BT is historical and organic; ST is relatively ahistorical and universal. Unlike BT, which is deeply committed to working inductively from the biblical text so that the text itself sets the agenda, ST may (...


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